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OF

MODERN GEOGRAPHY,

OR A

VIEW OF THE PRESENT STATE

OF

THE WORLD.

WITH AN APPENDIX, CONTAINING STATISTICAL TABLES OF

THE POPULATION, COMMERCE, REVENUE, EXPENDITURE,
DEBT, AND VARIOUS INSTITUTIONS OF THE UNITED
STATES; AND GENERAL VIEWS OF EUROPE AND THE
WORLD.

Elurrats
BY SIDNEY E. MORSE, A. M.

Accompanied with an Atlas.

PUBLISHED
BI GEORGE CLARK, BOSTON ; AND HOWE & SPALDING, NEW HAVEN,

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18073, March 1

Gratis.

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DISTRICT OF MASSACHUSETTS, TO WIT:

· District Clerk's Office. BE IT REMEMBERED, That on the twenty-seventh day of August, in the forty-seventh year of the lodependence of the United States of America, Sidney E. Morse, A. M. of the said District, has deposited in this Office the Title of a Book, the right whereof he claims as Author, in the words following, to wit:

A New System of Modern Geography, or a View of the Present State of the World. With an Appendix, containing Statistical Tables of the Popuation, Commerce, Revenue, Expenditure, Debt, and various Institutions of the United States; and General Views of Europe and the World. By Sid. Tiey E. Morse, A. M. Accompanied with an Atlas.

in conformity to the Act of the Congress of the United States, entitled, * An Act for the Encouragement of Learning, by securing the Copies or Maps, Charts and Books, to the Autbors and Proprietors of such Copies, uring the times therein mentioned :" and also to an Act entitled, “An Act upplementary to an Act, entitled, An Act for the Encouragement of Learnog, by securing the Copies of Maps, Charts and Books, to the Authors and Proprietors of such Copies during the times therein mentioned ; and extend.

'the Benefits thereof to the Arts of Designing, Engraving and Etching istorical and other Prints."

JNO. W. DAVIS, Clerk of the District

We of Massachusetts.

PREFACE.

Is the best treatises on Universal Geography in the nglish language we look in vain for that beautiful orr and lucid arrangement which so much delight us other sciences. In geometry we are presented with series of propositions connected together in regular der, each growing easily and naturally out of those hich preceded it; but in geography, though the subct admits to a considerable extent of the same arngement, towns, rivers, mountains, colleges, and caIs are thrown together without any reference to eir natural connection. Such confusion may not seriisly incommode the man who is already thoroughly quainted with the subject, or who consults his geraphy merely as a book of reference; but the stuint, who reads the work in course, and whose aim is

get clear and connected views of a whole country, ust peruse the description again and again, before • can accomplish his object, even if the materials hich are furnished in this loose manner will allow m to do it at all.

The natural order of description seems to require at we should in the first place give the boundaries : a country, the divisions, capes and bays, because lese can be perfectly understood without reference

any thing which is to come afterwards, while at the me time the mind, by becoming familiarized with rms which will frequently occur, is prepared in the ippiest manner for the subsequent parts of the deription. After this preparation, the next step should ually be to describe the face of the country, and escially to draw distinctly the great mountain lines. ivers should come after mountains, because the vurse in which they run is commonly determined by

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