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ration to the Stock Exchange, and after repeating this process five or six times without catching a glimpse of him, had at last the unspeakable mortification of being informed that he was a lame duck, and that he had not only waddled but bolted; or in other words, that this " remarkably prudent young gentleman" had run away, after having lost every thing, and had left nothing whatever to his numerous creditors, but his bright pea-green tilbury, upon which, however, an attachment was lodged by the groom in the sky-blue livery with silver shoulder-knots, for arrears of wages!

Sneaked homewards, calling in my way to countermand a pipe of port, which 1 had been ass enough to order upon anticipation. Entered my shop as if I were going to be hung; took up a dirty apron of Jem's which I tied round me, and began cutting up a sugar-loaf with great humility and compunction of spirit. My wife breaking into the shop as she beheld this apparition from the back parlour, I began to break to her our misfortune while I was breaking the sugar, when she flew into such a rage that I verily thought she would have finished by breaking my head. She would not have minded it so much, she said, but that she had lost the opportunity of mortifying Mrs. Tibbs, and that our best customer, Mr. Alderman Dewlap, had sent for his bill, declaring his intention of giving his custom to another shop. This she attributed to my impertinence, and insisted upon my writing him a submissive apology, which I sturdily refused doing, declaring I would be the master of my own house, and that though I was ruined, I would not be humbled or hen-pecked. Very angry words ensued, but I carried my point with a high hand, for instead of writing to the Alderman as she ordered, I called upon him, and made him a very humble apology in person.

STANZAS.

'• Whbk shall we two meet again 1"

Oh ask the breeze that bears me on
Over yon blue and pathless main.

And it will tell how soon!
Go ask the waves that roar

Round my bark as she holds hei way,
And as they wildly pour

On the beach where thy footsteps stray-
While the rude wind whistles loud,

And their crests are white with foam,
They may tell that, without a shroud,

I have sought my last cold home.
And will those bright eyes shed

A tear on the sullen wave,
When it tells that I have sped

To a cheerless lonely grave ?—
"When shall we two meet again i"

And must I answer thee?
Can the pilot tell thee when

Tempests shall vex the sea?
Though his bark sail smoothly on,

And the port seem just in view,
Yet their rage may burst anon

And o'erwhelm his gallant crew.

I have watch'd yon clear blue sky,

1 have mark'd the glassy main, And have told when storms were nigh,—

But I cannot tell thee when! "When shall we two meet again ?"—

And must 1 answer thee?— Oh ne'er! oh ne'er! till when

Our spirits are set free! Then the evils being over

That around us now are cast, Together they may hover

And smile upon the past. "And when shall we two meet?"

There is something in the tone
That asks, though passiug sweet,

Telling me I am lone.
Go ask the destined wretch,

If from the upas-tree
He still has hopes to fetch

Its fruitage, and be free :—
And if a smile shall beam

Upon his pallid face,
Through which his soul may seem

To thee to answer " Yes ;"—
Oh let thine eyes impart

That ray of hope to me, And then this aching heart

Shall bless, and clmg to thee—
As one, whom waves have torn

From his reeling vessel's side,
To the plank on which he is borne

Afloat o'er the waters wide.
"When shall we two meet again ?"—

Oh in that question all
That tell of grief and pain

Upon my spirit fall!
In childhood first we met,

When our hearts were free from care,
And I remember yet

How those days were bright and fair; And hadst thou ask'd me then,

As we sported merrily, "When shall we meet again I"

I could have answer'd thee.
But those words have now a tone

So sad, so drear to me,
For they speak of days long gone,

And can I answer thee?
As the passing bell that tolls

To the prisoner doom'd to die, When each echo as it rolls

Through his cell tells his hour is nigh; So sound those words to me,

Like that heavy and slow death-bell, And I only can answer thee

In that one wild word, "Farewell!"

n. x.

ration to the Stock Exchange, and after repeating this process five or six times without catching a glimpse of him, had at last the unspeakable mortification of being informed that he was a lame duck, and that he had not only waddled but bolted; or in other words, that this “remarkably prudent young gentleman” had run away, after having lost every thing, and had left nothing whatever to his numerous creditors, but his bright pea-green tilbury, upon which, however, an attachment was lodged by the groom in the sky-blue livery with silver shoulder-knots, for arrears of wages!

Sneaked homewards, calling in my way to countermand a pipe of port, which I had been ass enough to order upon anticipation. Entered my shop as if I were going to be hung; took up a dirty apron of Jem's which I tied round me, and began cutting up a sugar-loaf with great humility and compunction of spirit. My wife breaking into the shop as she beheld this apparition from the back parlour, I began to break to her our misfortune while I was breaking the sugar, when she flew into such a rage that I verily thought she would have finished by breaking my head. She would not have minded it so much, she said, but that she had lost the opportunity of mortifying Mrs. Tibbs, and that our best customer, Mr. Alderman Dewlap, had sent for his bill, declaring his intention of giving his custom to another shop. This she attributed to my impertinence, and insisted upon my writing him a submissive apology, which I sturdily refused doing, declaring I would be the master of my own house, and that though I was ruined, I would not be humbled or hen-pecked. Very angry words ensued, but I carried my point with a high hand, for instead of writing to the Alderman as she ordered, I called upon him, and made him a very humble apology in person.

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“WHEN shall we two meet again?”—
Oh ask the breeze that bears me on
Over yon blue and pathless main,
And it will tell how soon!
Go ask the waves that roar
Round my bark as she holds her way,
And as they wildly pour
On the beach where thy footsteps stray—
While the rude wind whistles loud,
And their crests are white with foam,
They may tell that, without a shroud,
I have sought my last cold home.
And will those bright eyes shed
A tear on the sullen wave,
When it tells that I have sped
To a cheerless lonely grave?—
“When shall we two meet again?”
And must I answer thee?
Can the pilot tell thee when
Tempests shall vex the sea?
Though his bark sail smoothly on,
And the port seem just in view,

Yet their rage may burst anon
* And o'erwhelm his gallant crew.

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THE COLONIAL PRESS.

ExPERIENce often shews us that the extreme of opposite qualities may be united in the same person or thing. It is thus, that while England has been justly styled the country of reason, she has exhibited at the same time as much prejudice as any other. While she has kept the glorious flame of freedom alive in the world, and while foreign nations struggling for liberty have derived energy from her example, and conquered back what Nature designed as a universal heritage, England has been seen in time past giving her assistance to their enemies, allying herself with the foes of freedom and humanity, and covertly or openly labouring against the propagation of those principles, the adoption of which elevated her beyond the other nations of the earth, and she has generally discovered her error when too late. At present, when a more liberal system of policy than we have for a long time experienced characterizes the government; when party hate, except among the mercenary in motive, the vulgar in thought and language, and the inveterate devotees of old habit, has declined, and the consideration of the common welfare has begun to occupy the place of effervescence and irritation—when a wise conciliation seems to be adopted by government, and the spirit of party softens its asperities, it will be thought not a little anomalous should this conduct be confined to the mother-country alone; and that Englishmen, when within the limits of the United Empire, if beyond the judicial authority of the Lord Chief Justice, should be as despotically governed and have real redress of outrage as little in their power as they would have in nations in Europe the most uncongenial to their feelings in character. The system of government in some of our colonies seems so oppressive and so contrary to the spiritexhibited at home—the exercise of brief authority by the underlings, who are omnipotent there, is frequently so wanton and subversive of everything like sense or reason, that it cannot pass much longer without animadversion in parliament. The press and the property it involves are, without law or the shadow of justice, sacrificed more particularly to the arbitrary despotism of petty tyrants, of men destitute of every thing but blind power, with just enough of intellect to see how useful an instrument it may be if devoted to their own purposes, but determined to suppress by force every thing that may be deemed offensive to themselves or their minions; utterly regardless of those principles of equity of which their country expects them to be conservators. Wherever the flag of England waves on the soil of the empire, Englishmen have a right to expect their property and privileges shall be protected by law, and by the same law as at home. It is sickening to hear the absurd cant uttered in palliation of the present course of proceeding, which generally centres in expediency, unsupported by fact and common sense. Expediency is in all such cases the refuge of wilful error or voluntary blindness. What a government like that of England wills it performs; and it is unjust towards its people that in those colonies, at least, in which the will of the Crown is absolute, and which Englishmen contribute to support from their pockets, or where they are abused and swindled by the existence of monopolies similar to that of the East India Company, or compelled to import and consume the produce of West India slavery and crime, in preference to that which may not be so tainted, they shall

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