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FOR THE USE OF SCHOOLS AND ACADEMIES IN THE UNITED

STATES OF AMERICA.

BY JEDIDIAH MORSE, D. D.
AUTHOR OF THE AMERICAN UNIVERSAL GEOGRAPHY AND TAX

AMERICAN GAZETTIER.

ILLUSTRATED BY MANS OF THE WORLD, AND OP NORTH-AMERICA,
ALSO, BY A SEPARATE ATLAS 07 NINE SELECT MAPS.-TO
WHICH IS ADDED A LIST OF QUESTIONS, TO RELIEVE
THE LABORS OF THE INSTRUCTER, AND GUIDE

THE INQUIRIES OF THE PUPIL.

There is not a son or daughter of Adam, but has some concern both in Geography
and Astronomy,

Dr. Watts.

Nineteenth Edition,
AND SEVENTH OF TAIS NEW ABRIDGEMENT.

BOSTON:

PUBLISHED BY THOMAS & ANDREWS.
SOLD AT THEIR BOOKSTORE, NO. 45, NEWBURY-STREET, AND BI
WEST AND RICHARDSON, NO. 75, CORNHILL; BY S. WOOD AND
SONS, NEW-YORK, M. CAREY, PHILADELPHIA ; AND BY THE

PRINCIPAL BOOKSELLERS IN THE UNITED STATES.

EZRA LINCOLN, PRINTER.

Sept. 1818.

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* DISTRICT OF MASSACHUSETTS, TO WIT: BE IT REMEMBERED, That on the twentieth day of April. in the thirty-third year of the Independence of the United States of America, Jedidiah Morse of the said District, has deposited in this office the Title of a Book, the right whereof he claims as Author, in the words following, to wit :

Geography made easy: being an Abridgement of the American Universal Gengra. phy. To which are prefixed Elements of Geography. For the use of Schools and Academies in the United States of America. By Jedidiah Morse, D. D. Author of the American Universal Geography, and the American Gazettter. There is not a son or daughter of Adam, but has some concern both in Geography and Astronomy.'-Dr. Watts. Illustrated with a map of the World, and a map of North-America."

In conformity to the Act of the Congress of the United States, entitled, “ An Act for the encouragement of Learning, by securing the copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the Authors and Proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentionad;" and also to an Act, entitled, “An Act supplementary to an Act, entitled. An Act for the encouragement of Learning, by securing the copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the Authors and Proprietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned ; and extending the benefits thervof to the Arts of Designing, Engraving and Etching Bistorieal and other Printe."

WILLIAM S. SHAW,
Clerk of the Bistrict of Massachusetts,

PREFACE.

NO national government bolds out to its subjecis so many alluring motives to obtain an accurate knowledge of their own country, and of its various interests, as that of the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. By the freedom of our elections, public bonors and public offices are not confined to any one class of men, lut are offercd to merit, in whatever rank it may be found. To discharge the duties of public office with honor and applause, the history, policy, commerce, productions, particular advantages and interests of the several states ought to be thoroughly undersioed. It is obviously wise and prudent, then, to initiate our youth into the knowledge of these things, and thus to form their minds upon correct principles, and prepare them for future wefulness and honor. There is no scie ence better adapted to the capacities of youth, and more apt to cape tivate their attention than Geography An acquaintance with this science, more than with any other, satisfies that pertinent curiosity, which is the predominant feature of the youthjul mind. This part of education was long neglected in America. Our young men, foro merly, were much better acquainted with the Geography of Europe and Asia, than with that of their own state and country. The want of suitable books was the cause of this defect in our education, Till the year 1789, when the first edition of ike American Geogra. phy was published by the Author, the geography of this part of the world was unwritten and indeed but very imperfectly known to any one. Previously to this period we seldom pretended to write, and bardly to think for ourselves. We bumbly received from GreatBritain our laws, our manners, our books, and our modes of thinka ing ; and our youth were educated rather as the subjects of the British king, than as the citizens of a free and independent nation. But the scene is now changed. The revolution has proved favor. able to science in general ; particularly to that of the geography of our own country.

In the following pages, the Author has endeavored to bring this valuable branch of knowledge home to common schools, and to the cottage fire side, by comprising, in a small and cheap volume, the most entertaining and interesting part of his American Universal Geography. He has endeavored to accommodate it to the use of

schools, as a reading book, that our youth of both sexes, at the same. time that they are learning to read, maiz ht imbibe un acquaintance with their country, and an attachment to its interests ; and, in that forming period of their lives, begin to qualify themselves to act their several parts in life, with reputation to themselves, and with useful. ness to their country. .

That the labors of the Author may be a benefit to the youth of that sountry which he loves, and which he has sedulously explored, is his most ardent wish.

Charlestown, November, 1814.

ADVERTISEMENT TO THE NINETEENTH

EDITION

To this and the two last Editions of this work, the Author has annexed a series of Questions, such as he deemed suitable for the Instructer to ask, and for the Pupil to be prepared to answer. His design in framing these questions was, to relieve the labor of the Instructer, and to direct the attention of the Pupil to the proper points of enquiry ; and this in such manner, as to require the exercise of the judgment of the Pupil in framing an answer.

An Atlas, selected from Pinkerton's lurger Work, accompanies this Edition.

The Author contemplates preparing and publishing, hereafter, on a new plan, Atlasses of different sizes, suited to illustrate his various Geographical Works.

Sept. 1898.

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