The Southern Quarterly Review

Portada
Daniel Kimball Whitaker, Milton Clapp, William Gilmore Simms, James Henley Thornwell
E. H. Britton, 1844

Dentro del libro

Comentarios de usuarios - Escribir una reseña

No hemos encontrado ninguna reseña en los sitios habituales.

Páginas seleccionadas

Otras ediciones - Ver todo

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 174 - To the very moment that he bade me tell it; Wherein I spake of most disastrous chances, Of moving accidents by flood and field, Of hair-breadth 'scapes i...
Página 75 - The remotest discoveries of the chemist, the botanist, or mineralogist, will be as proper objects of the poet's art as any upon which it can be employed, if the time should ever come when these things shall be familiar to us, and the relations under which they are contemplated by the followers of these respective sciences shall be manifestly and palpably material to us as enjoying and suffering beings.
Página 76 - I am now indebted, as being a work not to be raised from the heat of youth or the vapours of wine, like that which flows at waste from the pen of some vulgar amorist or the trencher fury of a rhyming parasite, nor to be obtained by the invocation of Dame Memory and her siren daughters...
Página 75 - Poet will sleep then no more than at present ; he will be ready to follow the steps of the Man of science, not only in those general indirect effects, but he will be at his side, carrying sensation into the midst of the objects of the science itself.
Página 123 - The trees went forth on a time to anoint a king over them ; and they said unto the olive tree, Reign thou over us. But the olive tree said unto them, Should I leave my fatness, wherewith by me they honour God and man, and go to be promoted over the trees ? And the trees said to the fig tree, Come thou, and reign over us.
Página 123 - Then said all the trees unto the bramble, Come thou, and reign over us. And the bramble said unto the trees, If in truth ye anoint me king over you, then come and put your trust in my shadow : and if not, let fire come out of the bramble, and devour the cedars of Lebanon.
Página 264 - A Dictionary of Science, Literature, and Art : Comprising the History, Description, and Scientific Principles of every Branch of Human Knowledge ; with the Derivation and Definition of all the Terms in General Use. Edited by WT BRANDE, FRSL and E.
Página 35 - Earth trembled from her entrails, as again In pangs ; and Nature gave a second groan ; Sky lour'd, and, muttering thunder, some sad drops Wept at completing of the mortal sin Original...
Página 375 - PUT them in mind to be subject to principalities and powers, to obey magistrates, to be ready to every good work, 2 To speak evil of no man, to be no brawlers, but gentle, shewing all meekness unto all men.
Página 472 - Let me make the songs of a Nation and I care not who makes its laws...

Información bibliográfica