The Works of the English Poets: With Prefaces, Biographical and Critical, Volumen 7

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Samuel Johnson
C. Bathurst, 1779
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Página 54 - our feet, Difcourag'd by your guilty fears, To hope for quarter for your ears, And doubting 'twas in vain to fue, You claim us boldly as your due ; Declare that treachery and force, To deal with us, is th* only courfe ; We have no title nor pretence 35 To body, foul, or confcience,
Página 43 - And led his troops with furious gallops, 365 To charge whole regiments of fcallops ; Not like their ancient way of war, To wait on his triumphal car ; But, when he went to dine or fup, More bravely ate his captives up, 370 And left all war, by his example,
Página 29 - To turn your zealous frauds, and force, To fits of confcience and remorfe ; To be convinc'd they were in vain, And face about for new again : For truth no more unveil'd your eyes, 1085 Than maggots are convinc'd to flies ; And therefore all your Lights and Calls Are but apocryphal and
Página 9 - The more, the more their foes divided : For though out-number'd, overthrown, And by the fate of war run down, Their duty never was defeated, Nor from their oaths and faith retreated; For loyalty is ftill the fame, Whether it win or lofe the game
Página 24 - againft the grain, T' have calls to teach it up again ; For 'twas but juftice to reftore The wrongs we had receiv'd before ; And, when 'twas held forth in our way, 785 We 'ad been ungrateful not to pay ; Who, for the right we 've done the nation, Have earn'd our temporal
Página 10 - was a traitor and a villain, was a brave fellow, had great parts, great courage, and was worthy to command : but for that Richard, that coxcomb, coquin, poltroon, he was furely the bafeft fellow alive. What is become of that fool ? How is it poffible he could be
Página 29 - of the Crown, That wanted wit to keep your own. 'Tis true ye have (for I'd be loth To wrong you) done your parts in both, 1190 To keep him out, and bring him in, As Grace is introduc'd by Sin ; For 'twas your zealous want of
Página 24 - them, from blue ribbands, down To all blue aprons in the town : From ladies hurried in calleches, With cornets at their footmen's breeches, To bawds as fat as Mother Nab, All guts and belly, like a crab. Our party 's great, and better ty'd With oaths, and trade, than any
Página 10 - he quickly took his leave, and next morning left the town, out of fear that the Prince might know that he was that very fool and coxcomb he had mentioned fo kindly ¡ and two days after the Prince did come to know who he was that he had treated fo well. Clarendon's
Página 169 - AN afs will with his long ears fray The flies, that tickle him, away ; But man delights to have his ears Blown maggots in by flatterers. ALL wit does but divert men from the road In which things vulgarly are underftood, And force Miftake and Ignorance to own A better

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