Barbed-Wire Imperialism: Britain's Empire of Camps, 1876-1903

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Univ of California Press, 3 oct. 2017 - 368 páginas
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"Some of the world's first refugee camps and concentration camps appeared in the British Empire in the late 19th century. Famine camps detained emaciated refugees and billeted relief applicants on public works projects; plague camps segregated populations suspected of harboring disease and accommodated those evacuated from unsanitary locales; concentration camps during the Anglo-Boer War, meanwhile, adapted a technology of colonial welfare in the context of war. Wartime camps in South Africa were simultaneously instruments of military violence and humanitarian care. While providing food and shelter to destitute refugees and disciplining and reforming a population cast as uncivilized and unhygienic, British officials in South Africa applied a developing set of imperial attitudes and approaches that also governed the development of plague and famine camps in India. More than the outcomes of military counterinsurgency, Boer War camps were registers of cultural discourses about civilization, class, gender, racial purity and sanitary pollution. Although British spokesmen regarded camps as hygienic enclaves, epidemic diseases decimated inmate populations creating a damaging political scandal. In order to curb mortality and introduce order, the British government mobilized a wide variety of disciplinary and sanitary lessons assembled at Indian plague and famine camps and at other kindred institutions like metropolitan workhouses. Authorities imported officials from India with experience managing plague and famine camps to systematize and rationalize South Africa's wartime concentration camps. Ultimately, improvements to inmates' health and well-being served to legitimize camps as technologies of liberal empire and biopolitical security"--Provided by publisher.
 

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Índice

Johannesburg and Springfontein
16
Ndabeni repurposed the former Uitvlugt plague camp
21
Family quarters Aldershot and an army field camp
25
Hadleigh labor colony
31
Barbedwire imperialism at Bitragunta Criminal Tribes Settlement
41
Detention
43
Map of Indian famines in 187677 and 189697
51
Women and children at an earthwork
65
Kitcheners wire net
135
British troops burned houses in India and South Africa
140
Camps were laid out with military precision
153
Only Matched in Times of Famine
159
The Showyard camp at Winburg
166
Camp death rates March 1901December 1901
177
Lizzie van Zyl and an anonymous Indian child
182
Camp
186

Camps rendered the famished visible to colonial bureaucracy
70
Urban cleansing Bombay
75
Different levels of security awaited those displaced
88
Model camp prescribed in the NorthWestern Provinces
102
Monegar Choultry camp
103
Uniform huts at Shetpal camp and khadicloth in Naldurg
107
Blueprint of Khana Junction Plague Detention Camp
113
Detention camp from the road Poona
114
Dadar Evacuation Camp
119
Illustrated guidelines for designated watermen
121
Civilian
129
The collection transportation and concentration of civilians
130
Map of South African camps
132
The new geniuses from India
196
Camp death rates December 1901December 1902
198
Public Works Department plans and construction of Uitenhage camp
204
Amalinda Bluff East London
206
Camps Go Global
212
Boer War concentration camp depicted by Jean Veber
215
Baqubah concentration camp in occupied Iraq
223
Notes
229
figures
253
Works Cited
307
Index
337
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Sobre el autor (2017)

Aidan Forth is Assistant Professor of British imperial history at Loyola University Chicago. 

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