Yestermorrow: Obvious Answers to Impossible Futures

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Rosetta Books, 2 may 2017 - 150 páginas
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The visionary science fiction author of Fahrenheit 451 shares his imaginative visions of the future in this collection of musings and memoirs.
 
Combining a series of recollections alongside his personal contemplation about the future, protean master of storytelling Ray Bradbury outlines his thoughts on the state of the world—how the past and present are reflected in society, technology, art, literature, and popular culture—as well as the need for creative thinkers to be the architects of the future.
 
In this extraordinary collection of essays, poetry, and philosophical reflection, readers glimpse inside the mind of one of the twentieth century’s most celebrated and prolific authors. Bradbury reveals the creative sparks that led to some of his most well-known and enthralling stories, along with the influences on his journey to becoming a prominent figure in modern literature. Part journal, part commentary, these writings are an exploration and celebration of a dreamer whose ideas had no bounds.
 

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A PREFACE
THE GIRLS WALK THIS WAY THE BOYS WALK THAT
WHO OWNS WHAT AND WHICH AND
THE AESTHETICS OF SIZE
DAY AFTER TOMORROW
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Sobre el autor (2017)

Ray Bradbury (1920 – 2012), one of the most celebrated writers of the 20th Century, was a prolific author of hundreds of short stories and more than three dozen books, as well as numerous poems, essays, operas, plays, teleplays, and screenplays. His iconic works include Fahrenheit 451, The Martian Chronicles, The Illustrated Man, Dandelion Wine, and Something Wicked This Way Comes. He wrote the screen play for John Huston's classic film adaptation of Moby Dick, for which he was nominated for an Academy Award. He adapted sixty-five of his stories for television's The Ray Bradbury Theater, and won an Emmy for his teleplay of The Halloween Tree. He was the recipient of the 2000 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters, the 2004 National Medal of Arts, and the 2007 Pulitzer Prize Special Citation, among many honors.

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