The Works of the English Poets: With Prefaces, Biographical and Critical, Volumen 2,Parte 2

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Página 342 - And they said, Go to, let us build us a city and a tower, whose top may reach unto heaven; and let us make us a name, lest we be scattered abroad upon the face of the whole earth.
Página 356 - I found everywhere there (though my understanding had little to do with all this) ; and, by degrees, with the tinkling of the rhyme and dance of the numbers, so that I think I had read him all over before I was twelve years old, and was thus made a poet as immediately as a child is made an eunuch.
Página 207 - ... them; and lastly (for there is no end of all the particulars of his glory) to bequeath all this with one word to his posterity ; to die with peace at home, and triumph abroad ; to be buried among kings, and with more than regal solemnity ; and to leave a name behind him, not to be extinguished...
Página 314 - I myself am able yet to do, is only to recommend to mankind the search of that felicity, which you instruct them how to find and to enjoy.
Página 356 - I remember when I began to read, and to take some pleasure in it, there was wont to lie in my mother's parlour (I know not by what accident, for she herself never in her life read any book but of devotion), but there was wont to lie Spenser's works...
Página 301 - Sometimes he lops the barren trees around, And grafts new life into the fruitful wound ; Sometimes he shears his flock, and sometimes he Stores up the golden treasures of the bee.
Página 274 - I hate, and yet I love thee too ; How can that be ? I know not how ; Only that so it is I know ; And feel with torment that 'tis so.
Página 275 - ... starve, without them ; but if once we be thoroughly engaged in the love of letters, instead of being wearied with the length of any day, we shall only complain of the shortness of our whole life. O vita, stulto longa, sapienti brevis...
Página 340 - ... him, if he have much to do in human affairs. The only advice therefore which I can give him is, to be...
Página 312 - I NEVER had any other desire so strong, and so like to covetousness, as that one which I have had always, that I might be master at last of a small house and large garden, with very moderate conveniences joined to them, and there dedicate the remainder of my life only to the culture of them, and study of nature...

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