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1781. barred the liberty of fishing for their support, though

their great leisure and many wants made it an object not only as an amusement, but as a mean of supplying their necessities. After bearing these evils with fortitude, they were informed in March, by lieut. col. Balfour, that, by positive orders from lord Cornwallis, he was to send them to some one of the West India islands. Preparations were made for the execution of the mandate ; but the general exchange of prisoners rendered them abortive.

It appearing to congress from the representation of the American gov. Clinton and other information, that commissions had been granted by the gov. of Connecticut, authorizing the persons to whom they were given, among other things, to go on Long Island and other islands adjacent, and seize the goods and merchandise they should there find, the property of British subjects' ; and that the said commissions were attended with many abuses dangerous to the public, as well as distresling to the citizens and friends of these United States, inhabiting the said ifands, some of whom, under pretext of the powers contained in such commissions, had been plundered of their property, and otherwise badly treated : and that che further continuance of the said commissions

would impede the public service in that quarter,---they Aug. “ Therefore resolved, that the gov. of Connecticut be, 7.

and he is hereby, desired immediately to revoke such commissions, so far as they authorize the feizure of goods on Long Isand or elsewhere, on land not within the state of Connecticut.” It was high time to revoke them, for under their cover a set of unprincipled plunderers „committed greater ravages upon many of the fast friends of 1785. America, than the words of congress fully express.

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In consequence of instructions of August the 3d, gen. Washington wrote on the 21st-" The almost daily 21. complaints of the severities exercised toward the American marine prisoners in New York, have induced the congress to direct me to remonstrate to the commanding officer of his British majesty's fhips upon the subject. The principal complaint now is, the inadequacy of the room in the prison ships, to the number of prifoners confined on board them, which occasions the death of many, and is the occasion of most intolerable inconveniencies and distresses to those who survive.” He had written early in the spring to Sir H. Clinton-" The very healthy condition, in which all prisoners have been returned by us since the commencement of the war, carries with it a conviction, that they have been uniformly and comfortably accommodated and fed on wholefome provisions. So conscious have I been, that the situation in which we always kept prisoners of war would bear inspection, that I have never been averse to having them visited by an officer of your own, who might be a witnefs to the propriety of their treatment. A request of this nature was a very little time ago refused to us by the officer commanding the British navy in the harbour of New York."

On August the 21st, congress authorized gen. Wafhington to go into a full exchange of gen. Burgoyne, and all the remaining officers of the Saratoga convention ; and resolved that the prisoners taken by the British at the Cedars, should be considered as subjects of exchange. That day week they ordered the board of war to make 28. 1781. barred the liberty of fishing for their support, though their

great leisure and many wants made it an object not only as an amusement, but as a mean of supplying their necessities. After bearing these evils with fortitude, they were informed in March, by lieut. col. Balfour, that, by positive orders from lord Cornwallis, he was to send them to some one of the West India islands. Preparations were made for the execution of the mandate ; but the general exchange of prisoners rendered them abortive.

It appearing to congress from the representation of the American gov. Clinton and other information, that commissions had been granted by the gov.

of Connecticut, authorizing the persons to whom they were given, among other things, to go on Long Isand and other inands adjacent, and seize the goods and merchandise they should there find, the property of British subjects; and that the said commissions were attended with many abuses dangerous to the public, as well as diftresting to the citizens and friends of these United States, inhabiting the said islands, some of whom, under pretext of the powers contained in such commissions, had been plundered of their property, and otherwise badly treated : and that the further continuance of the said commiffions

would impede the public service in that quarter,--they Aug. « Therefore resolved, that the gov. of Connecticut be, 7.

and he is hereby, desired immediately to revoke such commissions, fo far as they authorize the seizure of goods on Long Isand or elsewhere, on land not within the state of Connecticut.” It was high time to revoke them, for under their cover a set of unprincipled plunderers .com

mitted a fale

mitted

greater ravages upon many of the fast friends of 1785. America, than the words of congress fully express.

In consequence of instructions of August the 3d, gen. Washington wrote on the 21st-" The almost daily 21. complaints of the severities exercised toward the American marine prisoners in New York, have induced the congress to direct me to remonstrate to the commanding officer of his British majesty's fhips upon the subject. The principal complaint now is, the inadequacy of the room in the prison ships, to the number of prifoners confined on board them, which occasions the death of many, and is the occasion of most intolerable inconveniencies and distresses to those who survive.

He had written early in the spring to Sir H. Clinton—". The very healthy condition, in which all prisoners have been returned by us since the commencement of the war, carries with it a conviction, that they have been uniformly and comfortably accommodated and fed on wholefome provisions. So conscious have I been, that the situation in which we always kept prisoners of war would bear inspection, that I have never been averse to having them visited by an officer of your own, who might be a witnefs to the propriety of their treatment. A request of this nature was a very little time ago refused to us by the officer commanding the British navy in the harbour of New York.”

On August the 21st, congress authorized gen. Washington to go into a full exchange of gen. Burgoyne, and all the remaining officers of the Saratoga convention ; and resolved that the prisoners taken by the British at the Cedars, should be considered as subjects of exchange. That day weck they ordered the board of war to make 28. 1981. a sale of certain cannon and stores in the state of Rhode

INand, for specie only. This may be considered as a declarative act on their part against the further circulation of a paper currency. It has indeed ceased by common confent. Without it the Americans could not have carried on the war to the present period. The public benefit it has been of in this instance, will compensate in the estimation of patriotic politicians, for the immense evils of which it has otherwise been the occasion. The tender laws on one hand, and depreciation on the other, rendered it the bane of society. All classes were infected. It produced a rage for speculating. The mechanic, the farmer, the lawyer, the physician, the member of congress, and even a few of the clergy, in some places, were contaminated, and commenced merchants and speculators. The morals of the people were corrupted beyond any thing that could have been believed prior to the event. All ties of honor, blood, gratitude, humanity and justice were dissolved. Old debts were paid in several states when the paper money was more than 70 for one in hard cash; and in Virginia when at 300 for one. Brothers defrauded brothers, children parents and parents children. Widows, orphans and others, who had lived happily on their annual interest, were impoverished by being obliged to take depreciated paper for the specie principal that had been lent; creditors were frequently compelled to receive their debes in that currency, from men who confessed before witnesses, that the cash they borrowed saved them and their families from ruin. A person who had been supplied with specie in the jail at Philadelphia, while the British had poffefsion of the city, repaid it in paper afterward at a tenth

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