An Exposition of Evidence in Support of the Memorial to Congress: "setting Forth the Evils of the Existing Tariff of Duties ...": Prepared in Pursuance of Instructions from the Permanent Committee Appointed by the Free Trade Convention Assembled at Philadelphia to Prepare the Memorial to Congress, Volumen 25,Número 9

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Printed at the Boston Press, 1832 - 192 páginas
 

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Página 52 - The prosperity of commerce is now perceived and acknowledged, by all enlightened statesmen, to be the most useful as well as the most productive source of national wealth, and has accordingly become a primary object of their political cares.
Página 24 - ... this kind have not yet made any considerable progress, it is a reason for not rating them as high as those of iron; but as this material is the basis of them, and as their extension is not less practicable than important, it is desirable to promote it by a somewhat higher duty than the present. A question arises how far it might be expedient to permit the importation of iron in pigs and bars free from duty. It would certainly be favorable to manufacturers of the article, but the doubt is whether...
Página 50 - This right arm of the nation's safety strengthens its own muscle by its own efforts, and by unwearied exertion in its own defence becomes strong for the defence of the country. No one acquainted with this interest, can deny that its situation, at this moment, is extremely critical. We have left it hitherto to maintain itself or perish; to swim if it can, and to sink if it cannot. But at this moment of its apparent struggle, can we, as men, can we, as patriots, add another stone to the weight that...
Página 9 - Some other gentlemen, in the course of the debate, have spoken of the price paid for every foreign manufactured article, as so much given for the encouragement of foreign labor, to the prejudice of our own. But is not every such article the product of our own labor as truly as if we had manufactured it ourselves? Our labor has earned it, and paid the price for it. It is so much added to the stock of national wealth.
Página 6 - I will advert for a moment to some other general topics. We have heard much of the policy of England, and her example has been repeatedly urged upon us, as proving, not only the expediency of encouragement and protection, but of exclusion and direct prohibition also. I took occasion the other day to remark, that more liberal notions were...
Página i - A duty laid on imported implements of husbandry, would, in its operation, be an indirect tax on exported produce ; but will any one say, that by virtue of a mere power to lay duties on imports, Congress might go directly to the produce or implements of agriculture, or to the articles exported ? It is true, duties on exports are expressly prohibited; but if there were no article forbidding them, a power directly to tax exports...
Página 58 - ... notice to the other. The radical principle of all commercial intercourse between independent nations is the mutual interest of both parties. It is the vital spirit of trade itself; nor can it be reconciled to the nature of man, or to the primary laws of human society, that any traffic should long be willingly pursued, of which all the advantages are on one side, and all the burdens on the other. Treaties of commerce have...
Página 79 - The tariff of the last session was in its details not acceptable to the great interests of any portion of the Union, not even to the interest which it was specially intended to subserve. Its object was to balance the burdens upon native industry imposed by the operation of foreign laws, but not to aggravate the burdens of one section of the Union by the relief afforded to another. To the great principle sanctioned by that act — one of those upon which the Constitution itself was formed — I hope...
Página 66 - ... remedy; and no other appears to me but that of taking into our own hands both parts of the operation — the ascertainment of the value as well as the duty to be paid on the goods. If it be said that we might have in different ports different rules, the answer is, that there could be no diversity greater than that to which we are liable, from the fact of the valuation being now made in all the ports of foreign countries, from which we make our importations.
Página 96 - ... a right to do, not only the acts to effect that, which are specifically enumerated and permitted, but whatsoever they shall think, or pretend will be for the general welfare.

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