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“ It cannot fail to be regarded by all persons at all familiar with public men and public events, as among the most interesting works of a most interesting class. The formal records of history are far less entertaining than these details of the casual conversa

social habits and the personal characteristics of gifted and distinguished men. It is pleasant to witness the playful efforts of a great mind: and no one can regard with indifference the most ordinary details connected with those who have exerted a wide and a permanent influence upon national affairs. This universal and strongly attractive feeling will insure to this very interesting work of Mr. Rush, a wide perusal. The work is very handsomely printed in a thick and elegant volume of over 500 pages; and will, of course, form part of every library of any pretensions.”—N. Y. Courier and Enquirer.

"We have said that the work is not of a historical character strictly and it is not; but there is in it a history most important and valuable to those who would understand the relations of this country to England, and how the Oregon and other questions of national interest stood at the time of Mr. Rush's incumbency; and even to the general reader its valuable stores of anecdote and of incidents, in which the most brilliant lights of the English Court figured, will be most acceptable. Messrs. Lea & Blanchard have issued the volume in beautiful style, as regards printing and binding; and both in appearance and value the narrative is worth a place in the library of the most fastidious.”—U. S. Gazette.

• There is scarcely any feature of the work which has interested us more than its felicitous illustrations of the characters of many of the most eminent statesmen, not only of Great Britain, but of foreign countries, congregated at the British Court; we are left to infer wha

ter what they were from what they said and did ; and the descriptions are so easy and graphic, that it requires but a slight effort of imagination to fancy one's self a witness, and even a sharer of the very scenes which are described. This is but the continuation of a work, the first part of which was published some ten or twelve years ago; and unless we greatly mistake, those who read that with interest, will be still more interested in reading this. We must not omit to say that it makes a noble volume, being printed with a fine large type, which even those whose vision has begun to wane need not fear to encounter."-Albany Argus.

“ It is exceedingly valuable on account of the authentic information which it contains touching the Oregon negotiations, which were conducted by Mr. Rush on the part of the United States, and Messrs. Huskisson and Canning on the part of Great Britain.”-Savannah Republican.

SIBORNE'S WATERLOO CAMPAIGNS.

WITH MAPS AND PLANS.

HISTORY OF THE WAR IN FRANCE AND BELGIUM IN 1815; CONTAINING
MINUTE DETAILS OF THE BATTLES OF QUATRE-BRAS,

LIGNY, WAVRE, AND WATERLOO.
BY CAPTAIN W. SIBORNE.

In one large Octavo volume, extra Cloth. WITH MAPS AND PLANS OF THE BATTLES, &c., viz: 1. Part of Belgium, indicating the distribution of the armies on commencing hostilities. 2. Field of Quatre-Bras, at 3 o'clock, P. M. 3. Field of Quatre-Bras, at 7 o'clock, P.M. 4. Field of Ligny, at a quarter past 2 o'clock, P. M. 5. Field of Ligny, at half past 8 o'clock, P.M. 6. Field of Waterloo, at a quarter past 11 o'clock, A.M. 7. Field of Waterloo, at a quarter before 8 o'clock, P. M. 8. Field of Waterloo, at five minutes past 8 o'clock, P.M. 9. Field of Wavre, at 4 o'clock, P. M., 18th June. 10. Field of Wavre, at 4 o'clock, A. M., 19th June.

11. Part of France, on which is shown the advance of the Allied Armies into the Kingdom.

“When the work was first announced for publication we conceived great expectations from a history compiled by one whose access to every source of information was favoured both by interest in the highest quarters, and the circumstance of an official appointment on the staff. We looked for a work which should at once and forever set at rest the disputed questions of the campaign. We were not disappointed.”— Dublin University Magazine. ,

OF THE

SECOND W A R

BETWEEN THE

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,

AND

GREAT BRITAIN,

DECLARED BY

ACT OF CONGRESS, THE 18th OF JUNE, 1812,

AND CONCLUDED BY PEACE, THE 15th OF FEBRUARY, 1815.

BY

CHARLES J. INGERSOLL.

IN TH R E E VOLUMES...

VOL. I.
EMBRACING THE EVENTS OF 1812–13.:::

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PUENI PRARY

562455
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Entered according to the Act of Congress, in the year 1845, by

LEA AND BLANCHARD, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.

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CONTENTS.

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CHAPTER IX.

Northern Campaign.-Eustis resigns the War Department. - Armstrong ap-

pointed Secretary of War.—Plan of Campaign to attack Kingston.-General

Pike.-Town Meeting at Philadelphia.-Generals Dearborn and Pike capture

York.-Pike's Death.-Indian Scalp in Canadian Parliament House.-Revolu-

tionary Indian Barbarities.-Capture of Fort George by the Americans.-Re-

pulse of the English by General Brown at Sackett's Harbour.-Enormous Ex-

penses of Border and Lake War.-Generals Chandler and Winder surprised

and captured by General Vincent at Forty Mile Creek.—Colonel Burn retreats.

-General Lewis ordered to reinforce him.-Recalled by General Dearborn.-

Colonel Boerstler's Surrender at the Beaver Dams.-General Dearborn re-

moved from command of the Northern Army.-Succeeded ad interim by Ge-

neral Boyd.-Ordered not to act offensively.—Cooped up in Fort George all

Summer.-General Wilkinson takes command there in September.—State and

Number of the Forces at Sackett's Harbour, Fort George and Champlain.-

Expedition against Montreal.-Generals Armstrong, Wilkinson and Hampton.

-Their Plans and Feuds.-Hampton invades Canada-Is repulsed in Septem-

ber, and again in October.-Chauncey gets command of Lake Ontario.-Wil-

kinson's Descent of the St. Lawrence to attack Montreal.-Description and

Disasters of that Voyage.-Brave and successful Resistance of the English.-

Battle of Williamsburg.—Correspondence between Hampton and Wilkinson.-

Hampton refuses to join Wilkinson, who abandons the Expedition.-Public

Opinion respecting it.-Newspaper Accounts.-General M°Clure destroys Fort

George, and retreats to Fort Niagara.-Burns Queenstown.-British retaliate.-

Surprise Fort Niagara, and lay waste Western New York.-Impressions at

Washington.-Blue-lights reported by Decatur, as seen to give notice of his

movements.-English triumphs in Europe, and America embolden their War-

fare.—Disastrous close of Northern Campaign in 1813

- - 266

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