The Student's Manual, Complete: Being an Etymological and Explanatory Vocabulary of Words Derived from the Greek and Latin Languages

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Longmans, Green & Company, 1874
 

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Página 99 - Reading maketh a full man; conference a ready man; and writing an exact man. And therefore, if a man write little, he had need have a great memory; if he confer little, he had need have a present wit; and if he read little, he had need have much cunning, to seem to know that he doth not. Histories make men wise; poets witty; the mathematics subtle; natural philosophy deep; moral grave; logic and rhetoric able to contend.
Página 94 - Thou shalt not commit adultery, Thou shalt not kill, Thou shalt not steal, Thou shalt not bear false witness, Thou shalt not covet'; and if there be any other commandment, it is briefly comprehended in this saying, namely, 'Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself.' '"Love worketh no ill to his neighbour: therefore love is the fulfilling of the law.
Página 321 - WHEN all Thy mercies, O my God, My rising soul surveys, Transported with the view, I'm lost In wonder, love, and praise.
Página 206 - Or bright infers not excellence : the earth Though, in comparison of heaven, so small, Nor glistering, may of solid good contain More plenty than the sun that barren shines...
Página 247 - And it must be great want of ingenuity (to say no worse of it) to refuse to do it : since a definition is the only way whereby the precise meaning of moral words can be known...
Página 293 - A perfect judge will read each work of wit With the same spirit that its author writ; Survey the whole, nor seek slight faults to find Where Nature moves, and rapture warms the mind; Nor lose for that malignant dull delight, The gen'rous pleasure to be charm'd with wit.
Página 59 - But when the fulness of the time was come, God sent forth his Son, made under the law, to redeem them that were under the law, that they might receive the adoption of sons...
Página 327 - Vice is a monster of so frightful mien, As, to be hated, needs but to be seen; Yet seen too oft, familiar with her face, We first endure, then pity, then embrace.
Página 139 - But Aristotle, by the greatness of the action, does not only mean that it should be great in its nature, but also in its duration, or, in other words, that it should have a due length in it, as well as what we properly call greatness. The just measure...
Página 328 - The wide, the unbounded prospect lies before me : But shadows, clouds, and darkness rest upon it. Here will I hold. If there's a Power above us, — And that there is, all Nature cries aloud Through all her works, — He must delight in virtue; And that which He delights in must be happy.

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