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Nor grieved if thou be set at naught:
And oft alone in nooks remote
We meet thee, like a pleasant thought,

When such are wanted.

Be violets in their secret mews
The flowers the wanton Zephyrs choose ;
Proud be the rose, with rains and dews

Her head impearling;
Thou liv'st with less ambitious aim,
Yet hast not gone without thy fame;
Thou art indeed by many a claim

The Poet's darling,

If to a rock from rains he fly,
Or, some bright day of April sky,
Imprisoned by hot sunshine lie

Near the green holly,
And wearily at length should fare ;
He needs but look about, and there
Thou art !—a friend at hand, to scare

His melancholy.

A hundred times, by rock or bower,
Ere thus I have lain couched an hour,
Have I derived from thy sweet power

Some apprehension ;
Some steady love; some brief delight;
Some memory that had taken flight;
Some chime of fancy wrong or right;

Or stray invention.

If stately passions in me burn,
And one chance look to Thee should turn,

I drink out of an humbler urn

A lowlier pleasure;
The homely sympathy that heeds
The common life, our nature breeds;
A wisdom fitted to the needs

Of hearts at leisure.

Fresh-smitten by the morning ray,
When thou art up, alert and gay,
Then, cheerful Flower! my spirits play

With kindred gladness :
And when, at dusk, by dews opprest
Thou sink'st, the image of thy rest
Hath often eased my pensive breast

Of careful sadness.

And all day long I number yet,
All seasons through, another debt
Which I, wherever thou art met,

To thee am owing ;
An instinct call it; a blind sense ;
A happy, genial influence,
Coming one knows not how, nor whence,

Nor whither going

Child of the Year! that round dost run
Thy pleasant course, -when day's begun
As ready to salute the sun

As lark or leveret,
Thy long-lost praise thou shalt regain;
Nor be less dear to future men
Than in old time ;-thou not in vain

Art Nature's favorite.*

• See, in Chaucer and the elder Poets, the honors formerly paid to This flower.

SONNET.

“they are of the sky,

And from our earthly memory fade away." THOS 'HOSE words were uttered as in pensive mood

We turned, departing from that solemn sight: A contrast and reproach to gross delight, And life's unspiritual pleasures daily wooed ! But now upon this thought I cannot brood ; It is unstable as a dream of night; Nor will I praise a cloud, however bright, Disparaging Man's gifts, and proper food. Grove, isle, with every shape of sky-built dopes, Though clad in colors beautiful and pure, Find in the heart of man no natural home; The immortal Mind craves objects that endure: These cleave to it; from these it cannot roam, Nor they from it: their fellowship is secure.

SHE WAS A PHANTOM.

SHE was a Phantom of delight

When first she gleamed upon my sight.
A lovely. Apparition, sent
To be a moment's ornament;
Her eyes as stars of Twilight fair;
Like Twilight's, too, her dusky hair ;
But all things else about her drawn
From May-time and the cheerful Dawn;
A dancing Shape, an Image gay,
To haunt, to startle, and waylay.

I saw her upon nearer view,
A Spirit, yet a Woman too!

Her household motions light and free,
And steps of virgin-liberty;
A countenance in which did meet
Sweet records, promises as sweet ;
A Creature not too bright or good
For human nature's daily food;
For transient sorrows, simple wiles,
Praise, blame, love, kisses, tears, and smiles

And now I see with eye serene
The very pulse of the machine;
A Being breathing thoughtful Breath,
A Traveller between life and death;
The reason firm, the temperate will,
Endurance, foresight, strength, and skill;
A perfect woman, nobly planned,
To warn, to comfort, and command :
And yet a Spirit still, and bright
With something of angelic light.

ODE.

INTIMATIONS OF IMMORTALITY FROM RECOLLECTIONS

OF EARLY CHILDHOOD.

The Child is Father of the Man;
And I could wish my days to be
Bound each to each by natural piety.

See page 37.

I.

THERE was a time when meadow, grove, and

stream, The earth, and every common sight,

To me did seem

Apparelled in celestial light, The glory and the freshness of a dream,

It is not now as it hath been of yore;

Turn wheresoe'er I may,

By night or day, The things which I have seen I now can see no more.

11.

The Rainbow comes and goes,
And lovely is the rose,

The Moon doth with delight
Look round her when the heavens are bare,

Waters on a starry night

Are beautiful and fair ;
The sunshine is a glorious birth,
But yet I know, where'er I

go, That there hath past away a glory from the earth.

III.

Now, while the birds thus sing a joyous song,
And while the young lambs bound

As to the tabor's sound,
To me alone there came a thought of grief ;
A timely utterance gave that thought relief,

And I again am strong:
The cataracts blow their trumpets from the steep;
No more shall grief of mine the season wrong ;
I hear the Echoes through the mountains throng,
The Winds come to me from the fields of sleep,
And all the earth is

gay;
Land and sea
Give themselves up to jollity

And with the heart of May
Doth every Beast keep holiday ;-

Thou Child of Joy,
Shout round me, let me hear thy shouts, thou happy

Shepherd-boy!

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