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and many German physicians have since tried its effects, and with success. Every part of this plant was recommended by Baron Stoerck for medicinal purposes. The flowers have scarcely any smell.

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POLYANDRIA.

Order, POLYGYNIA.

THE ANEMONE.

See yon Anemones their leaves unfold,
With rubies flaming, and with living gold;
In silken robes each hillock stands arrayed.
Be gay! too soon the flowers of Spring will fade :
Ah! crop the flowers of pleasure while they blow,
Ere Winter hides them in a veil of snow.
Youth, like a thin Anemone, displays
His silken leaf, and in a morn decays.

SIR WM. JONES, from the Persian,

THE ANEMONE.

SHORT time ensued, till where the blood * was shed,
A flower began to raise its purple head ;
Still here the fate of lovely forms we see,
So sudden fades the sweet Anemone :
The feeble stems to stormy blasts a prey,
Their sickly beauties droop and pine away;
Their winds forbid the flowers to flourish long,
Which owe to winds their name in Grecian song t.

EUSDEN, from Ovid.

From the soft wing of vernal breezes shed,
Anemones; auriculas enriched
With shining meal o'er all their velvet leaves ;
And full ranunculus, of glowing red.

THOMSON.

The ancient writers inform us, that Venus, in her grief for the loss of Adonis, mingled her tears with his blood; from whence sprang an Anemone, the first ever seen.

† Anemone is derived from the Greek avnuos, the wind; and hence is called the wind-flower.

BLUE, OR HAREBELL.

(Non scriptus.)

This beautiful little flower is a native of Persia ; but is found in most parts of Europe. Our woods in the Spring present a lively appearance, from the mixture of their azure blue bells among the pale yellow primroses, and the many different tinted heaths, so tastefully intermingled by the hand of Nature. It is called Harebell from its generally growing in those places frequented by hares: the flower varies in colour and beauty; some being completely white, and others much resembling the poorer kinds of hyacinths; but they have longer and narrower flowers, not swelling at the bottom : the bunch of flowers is likewise longer and bends downwards. The fresh roots of this plant are said to be poisonous; the juice is mucilaginous, and in the time of Queen Elizabeth was used as starch.

Class, HEXANDRIA.

Order, MONOGYNIA.

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