A Clinical Treatise on the Endemic Fevers of the West Indies: Intended as a Guide for the Young Practitioner in Those Countries

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J. Churchill, 1837 - 309 páginas

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Página 18 - ... so easily. In general, if he be guilty of any imprudences, he feels restless at night, and can only sleep during the cool of the morning. He feels out of sorts ; has pains in the back and extremities, as if from fatigue ; be complains of headache, sickness and nausea ; and if these symptoms are not attended to immediately, suffers what is vulgarly called an attack of seasoning fever.
Página 17 - A European, or a native after a long residence in a temperate and healthy climate, arriving in St. Lucia, complains of a feeling of weight in the atmosphere — a something which resists the wish for exertion or exercise. Both his mind and body are oppressed ; his intellect is clouded ; his spirits are low and desponding, and all pre-existing love of enterprise vanishes. If his residence be protracted, he has slight febrile movements, which come on regularly or irregularly, not sufficiently severe...
Página 19 - The surface of the body was cold, the countenance expressed great anxiety, the pulse was small and scarcely perceptible, the patient was insensible to surrounding objects, and in a state of coma, only interrupted by severe convulsions.
Página 19 - One of them fell down apparently in a state of asphyxia, and the other was so affected as to be incapable of assisting him. The man most affected, after lying...
Página 6 - I think it may even be fairly presumed that water, for as long as it can preserve the figure of its particles above the surface, is innoxious, and that it must first be absorbed into the soil, and disappear to the eye, before it can produce any mischievous effects. The most ignorant peasant of Lincolnshire knows, that there is nothing to be apprehended from the ditches of his farm till they have been dried up by the summer heat; and though the inhabitant of Holland may point to the unexhausted foul...
Página 60 - The author's object was to find some "method of avoiding the disgust which the bitterness of quinine always excites ; and after repeated trials, he says he found it best to dissolve eight grains of the sulphate in half an ounce of rectified spirit and rub it, in two doses with an interval of a quarter of an hour between them, along the spine. In intermittent fever this should be done at the beginning of the cold fit; and it very often prevented even a single recurrence of it.
Página 19 - ... by another paroxysm, equal in violence to the last, except that the cold stage was scarcely perceptible.
Página 20 - The other man never suffered further inconvenience ; he said that the vapour had no perceptible smell ; that it was warm and moist, like steam, stopped the respiration for a moment, and produced a sense of faintness and trembling of the whole body.
Página 17 - ... exercise. Both his mind and body are oppressed ; his intellect is clouded ; his spirits are low and desponding, and all pre-existing love of enterprise vanishes. If his residence be protracted, he has slight febrile movements, which come on regularly or irregularly, not sufficiently severe to prevent his pursuing his usual avocations, but which, nevertheless, are sufficient to induce him- to throw himself upon a sofa and require a powerful effort of resolution to combat. In this manner his body...

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