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Not but he knew the signs of earthly He went not with the crowd to see a power

shrine ; Might well become Saint Peter's successor; But fed us by the way with food divine. The holy father holds a double reign, The prince may keep his pomp, the fisher In deference to his virtues, I forbear must be plain.

[grace, i To show you what the rest in orders were: Such was the saint, who shone with every This brilliant is so spotless and so bright, Reflecting, Moses-like, his Maker's face. He needs no foil, but shines by his own God saw his image lively was expressed,

proper light. And His own work as in creation blessed.

:0:The tempter saw him too with envious

eye, And, as on Job, demanded leave to try; WILLIAM SOMERVILLE. He took the time when Richard was de

1692—-1742. posed, And high and low with happy Harry closed.

THE CHASE. This prince, though great in arms, the priest withstood ;

Now, my brave youths, Near though he was, yet not the next in Now give a loose to the clean generous blood.

steed,

(spur, Had Richard unconstrained resigned the Flourish the whip, nor spare the galling throne,

But in the madness of delight forget A king can give no more than is his own : Your fears. Far o'er the rocky hills we The title stood entailed had Richard had

range,

[brave a son.

And dangerous our course; but in the

True courage never fails. In vain the Conquest, an odious name, was laid stream

[ditch aside,

In foaming eddies whirls : in vain the Where all submitted, none the battle tried. Wide gaping threatens death,—the craggy The senseless plea of right by Providence steep

(with care, Was, by a flattering priest, invented since, Where the poor dizzy shepherd crawls And lasts no longer than the present sway, And clings to every twig, gives us no pain, But justifies the next who comes in play. But down we sweep, as stoops the falcon

bold

[hill, The people's right remains ; let those To pounce his prey. Then up the opponent who dare

[are. By the swift motion slung we mount aloft : Dispute their power, when they the judges So ships in winter seas, now sliding sink

Adown the steepy wave, then tossed on He joined not in their choice, because high, he knew

[ensue. Ride on the billows and defy the storm. Worse might, and often did, from change Much to himself he thought, but little What lengths we pass! where will the spoke,

wandering chase

[skim And, undeprived, his benefice forsook. Lead us bewildered? Smooth as swallows

The new-shorn mead, and far more swift Now, through the land, his care of souls we fly.

[press he stretched,

| See my brave pack; now to the head they And like a primitive apostle preached. Jostling in close array, then more diffuse, Still cheerful; ever constant to his cal ; Obliquely wheel, while from their opening By many followed ; loved by most, ad- mouths

(the cranes mired by all ;

The volleyed thunder breaks. So when With what he begged, his brethren he Their annual voyage steer, with wanton relieved,

wing

[loud clang And gave the charities himself received. Their figure oft they change, and their Gave, while he taught; and edified the From cloud to cloud rebounds. more,

(to be poor. Because he showed by proof, 'twas easy

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first;

JAMES THOMSON.

SPRING SHOWERS. 1700-1748.

[shut up

The north-east spends his rage ; he now INVOCATION TO SPRING. Within his iron cave, the effusive south

Warms the wide air, and o'er the void of Come, gentle Spring i ethereal mildness, heaven

[distent. come,

Breathes the big clouds with vernal showers And from the bosom of yon dropping At first a dusky wreath they seem to rise, cloud,

Scarce staining ether; but, by swift degrees, While music wakes around, veiled in a In heaps on heaps the doubling vapour shower

sails Of shadowing roses, on our plains descend. Along the loaded sky, and mingling deep,

Sits on the horizon round, a settled gloom :
Not such as wintry storms on mortals shed,

Oppressing life; but lovely, gentle, kind,
SPRING FLOWERS.

And full of every hope and every joy,

The wish of Nature. Gradual sinks the ALONG these blushing borders, bright with breeze dew,

Into a perfect calm, that not a breath And in yon mingled wilderness of flowers, Is heard to quiver through the closing Fair-handed Spring unbosoms every grace;

woods, Throws out the snowdrop and the crocus Or rustling turn the many-twinkling leaves

Of aspen tall. The uncurling floods, The daisy, primrose, violet darkly blue,

diffused

[lapse And polyanthus of unnumbered dyes ; In glassy breadth, seem through delusive The yellow wallflower, stained with iron- Forgetful of their course. 'Tis silence all, brown,

And pleasing expectation. Herds and And lavish stock that scents the garden flocks

[eye round;

i Drop the dry sprig, and mute-imploring From the soft wing of vernal breezes shed The falling verdure. Hushed in short Anemones ; auriculas, enriched

suspense, With shining meal o'er all their velvet The plumy people streak their wings with leaves;

To throw the lucid moisture trickling off ; And full ranunculas of glowing red. And wait the approaching sign to strike, Then comes the tulip race, where Beauty

at once,

(vales, plays

Into the general choir. Even mountains, Her idle freaks ; from family diffused And forests seem, impatient, to demand To family, as flies the father-dust,

The promised sweetness. Man superior The varied colours run ; and, while they walks break

[marks Amid the glad creation, musing praise, On the charmed eye, th' exulting florist And looking lively gratitude. At last With secret pride the wonders of his hand. The clouds consign their treasures to the No gradual bloom is wanting ; from the fields, bud,

(tribes ; And, softly shaking on the dimpled pool Firstborn of Spring, to Summer's musky Prelusive drops, let all their moisture flow Nor hyacinths, of purest virgin white, In large effusion o'er the freshened world. Low bent, and blushing inward ; nor The stealing shower is scarce to patter jonquils

heard, of potent fragrance ; nor Narcissus fair,

By such as wander through the forest walks, As o'er the fabled fountain hanging still ; Beneath th' umbrageous multitude of Nor broad carnations, nor gay-spotted leaves.

[descends pinks ;

[damask rose. But who can hold the shade while Heaven Nor, showered from every bush, the In universal bounty, shedding herbs Infinite numbers, delicacies, smells,

And fruits and flowers on Nature's ample
With hues on hues expression cannot paint, lap?
The breath of Nature, and her endless Swift Fancy fired anticipates their growth;
bloom.

And, while the milky nutriment distils,
Beholds the kindling country colour round.

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Thus all day long the full-distended clouds

(showered earth Indulge their genial stores, and wellIs deep enriched with vegetable life ; Till, in the western sky, the downward sun Looks out, effulgent, from amid the flush Of broken clouds, gay shifting to his beam. The rapid radiance instantaneous strikes The illumined mountain, through the forest

streams, Shakes on the floods, and in a yellow mist, Far smoking o'er the interminable plain, In twinkling myriads lights the dewy gems. Moist, bright, and green, the landscape laughs around.

(wakes, Full swell the woods; their every music Mixed in wild concert with the warbling

brooks. Increased, the distant bleatings of the hills, And hollow lows responsive from the vales, Whence, blending all, the sweetened zephyr springs.

[cloud, Meantime, refracted from yon eastern Bestriding earth, the grand ethereal bow Shoots up immense, and every hue unfolds, In fair proportion running from the red To where the violet fades into the sky. Here, awful Newton, the dissolving clouds Form, fronting on the sun, thy showery

prism; And to the sage-instructed eye unfold The various twine of light, by thee disclosed From the white mingling maze. the boy;

(ment bend, He wondering views the bright enchantDelightful, o'er the radiant fields, and runs To catch the falling glory; but amazed Beholds the amusive arch before him fly, Then vanish quite away.

Still night succeeds, A softened shade, and saturated earth Awaits the morning beam, to give to light, Raised through ten thousand different

plastic tubes, The balmy treasures of the former day.

Not so

It was, I ween, a lovely spot of ground, And there a season atween June and May, Half prankt with spring, with summer half imbrowned,

(say, A listless climate made, where, sooth to No living wight could work, ne cared even

for play. Was nought around but images of rest, Sleep-soothing groves and quiet lawns between,

(kest And flowery beds that slumbrous influence From poppies breathed ; and beds of plea

sant green Where never yet was creeping creature seen. Meantime unnumbered glittering stream

lets played, And hurlèd everywhere these waters sheen, That as they bickered through the sunny

glade Though restless still themselves, a lulling

murmur made. Joined to the prattle of the purling rills Were heard the lowing herds along the vale, And flocks loud bleating from the distant

hills, And vacant shepherds piping in the dale ; And now and then sweet Philomel would

wail, Or stockdoves 'plain amid the forest deep, That drowsy rustled to the sighing gale ; And still a coil the grasshopper did keep, Yet all these sounds yblent inclined all

to sleep. Full in the passage of the vale above, A sable, silent, solemn forest stood, Where nought but shadowy forms was

seen to move, As Idless fancied in her dreaming mood; And tip the hills, on either side, a wood Of blackening pines, aye waving to and fro, Sent forth a sleepy horror through the

blood.

A WINTER PICTURE,

[gods, The Redbreast, sacred to the household Wisely regardful of th' embroiling sky, In joyless fields and thorny thickets leaves His shivering mates, and pays to trusted

man

His annual visit. Half afraid, he first Against the window beats ; then brisk

alights

SHENSTONE-JOHNSON.

19

WILLIAM SHENSTONE.

1714-1763.

THE SCHOOLMISTRESS'S

GARDEN.

HERBS too she knew, and well of each

could speak, That in her garden sipped the silvery dew, Where no vain flow'r disclosed a gaudy

streak, But herbs for use and physic; not a few Of gay renown within those borders grew. The tufted basil, pun-provoking thyme, Fresh balm, and marigold of cheerful hue, The lowly gill, that never dares to climb, And more I fain would sing, disdaining

here to rhyme.

His smile alone security bestows : Still to new heights his restless wishes tower ;

(power; Claim leads to claim, and power advances Till conquest unresisted ceased to please, And rights subverted left him none to seize. At length his sovereign frowns-the train of state

[to hate: Mark the keen glance, and watch the sign Where'er he turns he meets a stranger's eye,

[lowers fly. His suppliants scorn him, and his fol Now drops at once the pride of awful state, The golden canopy, the glittering plate, The regal palace, the luxurious board, The liveried army, and the menial lord. With age, with cảres, with maladies op

pressed, He seeks the refuge of monastic rest. Grief aids disease, remembered folly stings, And his last sighs reproach the faith of

kings.

Yet euphrasy may not be left unsung, That gives dim eyes to wander leagues

around, And pungent radish biting infant's tongue, And plantain ribbed that heals the reaper's wound;

[found, And marjoram sweet, in shepherd's posie And lavender, whose spikes of azure bloom Shall be erewhile in arid bundles bound, To lurk amidst the labours of her loom, And crown her kerchiefs clean with mickle rare perfume.

(crowned And here trim rosemarine that whilome The daintiest garden of the proudest peer, Ere, driven from its envied site, it found A sacred shelter for its branches here, Where edged with gold its glittering skirts appear.

(well! Oh, wassail days ! oh, customs meet and Ere this was banished from its lofty sphere! Simplicity then sought this humble cell, Nor ever would she more with thane and

lordling dwell.

Speak thou, whose thoughts at humble peace repine,

[be thine? Shall Wolsey's wealth with Wolsey's end Or liv'st thou now, with safer pride content, The wisest justice on the banks of Trent? For why did Wolsey, near the steeps of fate, On weak foundations raise th' enormous weight?

[blow, Why, but to sink beneath misfortune's With louder ruin to the gulfs below ?

knife, What gave great Villiers to the assassin's And fixed disease on Harley's closing life? What murdered Wentworth, and what

exiled Hyde, By kings protected, and to kings allied ? What but their wish indulged in courts to

shine, And power too great to keep or to resign? When first the college rolls receive his name,

[fame: The young enthusiast quits his ease for Resistless burns the fever of renown, Caught from the strong contagion of the gown :

(spread, O'er Bodley's dome his future labours And Bacon's mansion trembles o'er his head.

[youth, Are these thy views ? proceed, illustrious And virtue guard thee to the throne of

truth! Yet should thy soul indulge the generous

heat, Till captive science yields her last retreat ;

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SAMUEL JOHNSON.

1709-1784.

WOLSEY.

IN full-blown dignity see Wolsey stand, Law in his voice, and fortune in his hand : To him the Church, the realm, their powers consign,

(shine, Through him the rays of regal bounty Turned by his nod the stream of honour

flows,

His studious patience and laborious art
By regular approach essayed the heart;
Cold approbation gave the lingering bays,
For those who durst not censure scarce

could praise. A mortal born, he met the general doom, But left, like Egypt's kings, a lasting tomb.

:0:

Should reason guide thee with her brightest

ray, And pour on misty doubt resistless day; Should no false kindness lure to loose de

light, Nor praise relax, nor difficulty fright; Should tempting novelty thy cell refrain, And sloth effuse her opiate fumes in vain; Should beauty blunt on fops her fatal dart, Nor claim the triumph of a lettered heart; Should no disease thy torpid veins invade, Nor melancholy's phantom haunt thy

shade; Yet hope not life from grief or danger free, Nor think the doom of man reversed for thee:

[eyes, Deign on the passing world to turn thine And pause a while from learning, to be wise: There mark what ills the scholar's life assail, Toil, envy, want, the patron, and the jail. See nations slowly wise, and, meanly just, To buried merit raise the tardy bust. If dreams yet flatter, once again attend, Hear Lydiat's life, and Galileo's end.

JAMES BEATTIE.

1735–1803.

THE MELODIES OF MORNING.

BUT who the melodies of morn can tell ? The wild brook babbling down the mountain side ;

(bell ; The lowing herd ; the sheepfold's simple The pipe of early shepherd dim descried In the lone valley ; echoing far and wide The clamorous horn along the cliffs above; The hollow murmur of the ocean tide ; The hum of bees, the linnet's lay of love, And the full choir that wakes the universal

grove.

Nor deem, when Learning her last prize

bestows, The glittering eminence exempt from foes; See when the vulgar 'scapes, despised or

awed, Rebellion's vengeful talons seize on Laud; From meaner minds though smaller fines

content, The plundered palace or sequestered rent, Marked out by dangerous parts he meets

the shock, And fatal learning leads him to the block : Around his tomb let art and genius weep, But hear his death, ye blockheads, hear

and sleep.

The cottage curs at early pilgrim bark ; Crowned with her pail the tripping milk

maid sings; The whistling ploughman stalks afield ;

and, hark ! Down the rough slope the ponderous waggon rings,

(springs ; Through rustling corn the hare astonished Slow tolls the village clock the drowsy hour; The partridge bursts away on whirring wings;

[bower, Deep mourns the turtle in sequestered And shrill lark carols clear from her aërial

tour.

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