The Quarterly review, Volumen 34

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Murray, 1826

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Página 210 - O, what a noble mind is here o'erthrown! The courtier's, soldier's, scholar's, eye, tongue, sword; The expectancy and rose of the fair state, The glass of fashion and the mould of form, The observed of all observers, quite, quite down!
Página 516 - O God ! that one might read the book of fate, And see the revolution of the times Make mountains level, and the continent, Weary of solid firmness, melt itself Into the sea : and, other times, to see The beachy girdle of the ocean Too wide for Neptune's hips...
Página 575 - He that wrestles with us strengthens our nerves and sharpens our skill. Our antagonist is our helper. This amicable conflict with difficulty obliges us to an intimate acquaintance with our object, and compels us to consider it in all its relations. It will not suffer us to be superficial.
Página 2 - He is to exhibit his author's thoughts in such a dress of diction as the author would have given them, had his language been English : rugged magnificence is not to be softened : hyperbolical ostentation is not to be repressed, nor sententious affectation to have its points blunted. A translator is to be like his author : it is not his business to excel him.
Página 193 - Augustus at Rome was for building renown'd, And of marble he left what of brick he had found ; But is not our Nash, too, a very great master ? He finds us all brick, and he leaves us all plaster.
Página 227 - But fill'd, in elder time, the historic page. There, Shakespeare's self, with every garland crown'd, Flew to those fairy climes his fancy sheen, In musing hour, his wayward Sisters found, And with their terrors drest the magic scene. From them he sung, when, 'mid his bold design, Before the Scot, afflicted, and aghast ! The shadowy kings of Banquo's fated line Through the dark cave in gleamy pageant pass'd.
Página 608 - The True History of the State Prisoner, commonly called the Iron Mask...
Página 368 - I am sorry for H. Fielding's death, not only as I shall read no more of his writings, but I believe he lost more than others, as no man enjoyed life more than he did, though few had less reason to do so, the highest of his preferment being raking in the lowest sinks of vice and misery.
Página 171 - It may, perhaps, be worth while to remark, that, if we except the poets, a few orators, and a few historians, the far greater part of the other eminent men of letters, both of Greece and Rome, appear to have been either public or private teachers ; generally either of philosophy or of rhetoric.
Página 216 - The Drama's laws, the Drama's patrons give; For those who live to please, must please to live.

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