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XIX, An Account of some organic Remains found near Brentford,

Middlesex. By the late Mr. William Kirby Trimmer. Communicated in a Letter from Mr. James R. Trimmer to the Right Hon. Sir Joseph Banks, Bart. K. B. P.R. S. p. 131

p XX. On a new Construction of a Condenser and Air-pump. By

the Rev. Gilbert Austin. In a Letter to Sir Humphry Davy, LL.D. F.R.S.

p. 138 XXI. On the Formation of Fat in the Intestines of living Animals.

By Sir Everard Home, Bart. Presented by the Society for promoting the Knowledge of Animal Chemistry. p. 146 XXII. On the colouring Matter of the black Bronchial Glands,

and of the black Spots of the Lungs. By George Pearson, M. D. F.R.S.

p. 159 XXIII. Experiments on the Alcohol of Sulphur, or Sulphuret of

Carbon. By J. Berzelius, M. D. F. R.S. Professor of Chemistry at Stockholm; and Alexander Marcet, M. D. F.R. S. one of the Physicians to Guy's Hospital.

p. 171 XXIV. On the Means of procuring a steady Light in Coal Mines

without the danger of Explosion. By William Reid Clanny, M. D. of Sunderland. Communicated by. William Allen, Esq. F.R.S.

p. 200 XXV. On the Light of the Cassegrainian Telescope, compared with

that of the Gregorian. By Captain Henry Kater, BrigadeMajor. Communicated by the Right Hon. Sir Joseph Banks, Bart. K. B. P.R.S.

P. 206

XXVI. Additional Observations on the Effects of Magnesia in

preventing an increased Formation of Uric Acid; with Remarks

on the Influence of Acids upon the Composition of the Urine. By

William Thomas Brande, Esq. F. R. S. Prof. Chem. R. I.

Communicated by the Society for improving Animal Chemistry.

p. 213

XXVII. Additions to an Account of the Anatomy of the Squalus

Maximus, contained in a former Paper; with Observations on

the Structure of the Branchial Artery. By Sir Everard Home,

Bart. F. R. S.

p. 227

XXVIII. Some further Observations on a new detonating Sub-

stance. In a Letter from Sir Humphry Davy, LL.D. F.R. S.

V.P. R. I. to the Right Hon. Sir Joseph Banks, Bart. K. B.

P.R.S.

p. 242

XXIX. Experiments on the Production of Cold by the Evapora-

tion of the Sulphuret of Carbon. By Alexander Marcet, M.D.

F. R. S. one of the Physicians to Guy's Hospital. p. 252

XXX. On a saline Substance from Mount Vesuvius. By James

Smithson, Esq. F. R. S.

p. 256

XXXI. Some Experiments and Observations on the Substances

produced in different chemical Processes on Fluor Spar. By Sir

Humphry Davy, LL.D. F. R. S. V. P. R. I.

XXXII. Catalogue of North Polar Distances of Eighty-four

principal fixed Stars, deduced from Observations made with the

Mural Circle at the Royal Observatory. By John Pond, Esq.

Astronomer Royal, F. R. S.

XXXIII. Observations of the Summer Solstice, 1819, with the

Mural Circle at the Royal Observatory. By John Pond, Esq.

Astronomer Royal, F. R. S.

p. 304

Presents received by the Royal Society, from November 1812 to

July 1813.

p. 305

Index.

TRANSACTIONS.

XIX. An Account of some organic Remains found near Brentford,

Middlesex. By the late Mr. William Kirby Trimmer. Communicated in a Letter from Mr. James R. Trimmer to the Right Hon. Sir Joseph Banks, Bart. K. B. P.R. S.

Read March 4, 1813.

Sır, My late brother, in digging clay near Brentford, for the manufacture of bricks and tiles, frequently found the remains of animals and extraneous fossils, which you, Sir, with other

, Gentlemen of the Royal Society, very often inspected, and the interest which you took in them added much to his ardour in collecting them.

A few days before he was attacked with the illness which terminated in his death, he had drawn up an account of the different strata in which the organic remains in his cabinet were found deposited, with the intention of submitting it to you. His long illness and other circumstances have delayed my communicating to you earlier the enclosed letter, which I found amongst his papers; and I request, Sir, that if you

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should deem it of sufficient interest, you will do me the honour of laying it before the Royal Society.

I have the honour to be, Sir,
with great respect,
your much obliged humble servant,

JAMES R. TRIMMER. Brentford, Feb. 1813.

To the Right Hon. Sir Joseph Banks, Bart. &c. &c. &c.

SIR, My collection of organic remains having been nearly formed under your own eye, and my zeal in the collection, and care

, in the preservation of them, having been greatly increased by the importance which yourself and other Gentlemen of the Royal Society have attached to them, I do myself the honour of presenting to you the following statement of the manner in which they were deposited in the strata where they have been found; conceiving that however curious the specimens may be in themselves, they can conduce but little to the advancernent of geological knowledge, if that part of their history is wanting.

The specimens have been collected from two fields, not contiguous to each other; therefore to avoid confusion, I shall take each field separately, first describing the strata as far as they have come within my knowledge, and afterwards I shall speak of the organic remains as they were respectively found in those strata.

The first field is about half a mile north of the Thames at Kew bridge; its surface is about twenty-five feet above the

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Thames at low water. The strata here are first, sandy loam from six to seven feet, the lowest two feet slightly calcareous. Second, sandy gravel a few inches only in thickness. Third, loam slightly calcareous from one to five feet; between this and the next stratum, peat frequently intervenes in small patches of only a few yards wide, and a few inches thick. Fourth, gravel containing water; this stratum varies from two to ten feet in thickness, and is always the deepest in the places covered by peat; in these places the lower part of the stratum becomes an heterogeneous mass of clay, sand, and gravel, and frequently exhales a disagreeable muddy smell. Fifth, the main stratum of blue clay, which lies under this, extends under London and its vicinity, the average depth of this clay has been ascertained, by wells that have been dug through it, to be about two hundred feet under the surface of the more level lands, and proportionably deeper under the hills, as appears from Lord Spencer's well at Wimbledon, which is five hundred and sixty-seven feet deep. This stratum, besides figured fossils, contains pyrites and many detached nodules; at the depth of twenty feet there is a regular stratum of these nodules, some of which are of very considerable size.

In the first stratum, as far as my observation has extended, no remains of an organised body has ever been found, and as my search has not been very limited, I may venture to say it contains none. In the second stratum, snail shells, and the shells of river fish have been found, and a few bones of land animals, but of inconsiderable size, and in such a mutilated state, that it cannot be ascertained to what class they belong. In the third stratum, the horns and bones of the ox, and the horns, bones, and teeth of the deer have been found, and also, as

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