Guns for the Sultan: Military Power and the Weapons Industry in the Ottoman Empire

Portada
Cambridge University Press, 24 mar. 2005 - 277 páginas
Gabor Agoston's book contributes to an emerging strand of military history, that examines organised violence as a challenge to early modern states, their societies and economies. His is the first to examine the weapons technology and armaments industries of the Ottoman Empire, the only Islamic empire that threatened Europe on its own territory in the age of the Gunpowder Revolution. Based on extensive research in the Turkish archives, the book affords much insight regarding the early success and subsequent failure of an Islamic empire against European adversaries. It demonstrates Ottoman flexibility and the existence of an early modern arms market and information exchange across the cultural divide, as well as Ottoman self-sufficiency in weapons and arms production well into the eighteenth century. Challenging the sweeping statements of Eurocentric and Orientalist scholarship, the book disputes the notion of Islamic conservatism, the Ottomans' supposed technological inferiority and the alleged insufficiencies in production capacity. This is a provocative, intelligent and penetrating analysis, which successfully contends traditional perceptions of Ottoman and Islamic history.
 

Comentarios de usuarios - Escribir una reseña

No hemos encontrado ninguna reseña en los sitios habituales.

Índice

Gunpowder technology and the Ottomans
15
Tables
26
Cannons and muskets
61
Saltpeter industries
96
Gunpowder industries
128
Munitions and ordnance industries
164
guns and empire
190
Notes on weights and measurements
242
Bibliography
248
Index
260
Página de créditos

Otras ediciones - Ver todo

Términos y frases comunes

Referencias a este libro

Sobre el autor (2005)

Gabor Agoston is Assistant Professor in the Department of History, Georgetown University. His previous publications include Hungary in the Seventeenth Century (with Terez Oborni, 2000).

Información bibliográfica