Modern Spain, 1875-1980

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Oxford University Press, 2001 - 201 páginas
The word 'liberal', as part of our political vocabulary comes from Spain. It was first used to describe a group of radical patriots cooped up in Cadiz, refugees from the French invasion of 1808. In 1812 they drew up a constitution enshrining the sovereignty of the people which struck the verybasis of the old monarchy and became the model for advanced democrats from St Petersburg to Naples. Universal male suffrage was established in Spain in 1890 - earlier than Britain. The imposition of advanced liberal institutions on a conservative society, both economically and socially backward,inevitably caused tensions, and these, Raymond Carr argues, explain much of modern Spanish history. His analysis, incorporating much new research, starts at the 'September Revolution' of 1868 and goes right up to the present day. In the 1970s and 80s the country suffered less from the violent social disruption experienced in previous decades, but - as always - Spain is beset with acute regional problems which become more pressing the longer they remain unsolved.
 

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Índice

The Liberal Heritage
1
Stagnation and Progress
16
3 Society in Transition 18751914
31
4 Regenerationism and the Critics of the Régime
47
The Failure of Revolution from Above
71
6 The Crisis of the Parliamentary Monarchy 19171923
81
7 The Dictatorship of Primo de Rivera and the Fall of the Monarchy 19231931
98
8 The Second Republic 19311936
117
9 The Civil War 19361939
135
10 Francoism 19391975
155
The Transition to Democracy
173
Select Bibliography
182
Index
189
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Sobre el autor (2001)


Sir Raymond Carr, for many years Warden of St Antony's College, Oxford, was in 1999 honoured by Spain with the prestigious Prince of Asturias prize.

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