Imágenes de página
PDF
ePub

TRACTS

ON

LAW, GOVERNMENT,

AND OTHER

POLITICAL SUBJECTS;

BEING

PARTLY REPUBLICATIONS AND PARTLY ORIGINAL.

COLLECTED AND EDITED

BY

JOHN PALMER, GENT.

AUTHOR OF

THE PRACTICE OF APPEALS IN THE HOUSE OF LORDS," &c.

“Of law no less can be said than that her seat is the bosom of God; her voice
the harmony of the world. All things in heaven and in earth do her homage,
the least as feeling her care, and the greatest as not exempt from her power.”

HOOKER.

LONDON:

SAUNDERS AND BENNING, LAW BOOKSELLERS,

(SUCCESSORS TO J. BUTTERWORTH AND SON,)

43, FLEET STREET,

1836.

642

LONDON :

PRINTED BY RAYNER AND HODGES,

15, Shoe Lane, Fleet Street.

TO VITRUVIUS LAWES, ESQ.

SERJEANT AT LAW.

Sir,

I have had the pleasure of knowing you longer than I have known any other gentleman now practising at the Bar, and have always admired your agreeable manners, as well as your accurate legal information, both in theory and practice; part of which, in consequence of modern changes, you will have to forget, while you have something to learn It is told of one of your learned predecessors, the celebrated Serjeant Maynard, that on his being introduced to William III., the King observed, that the Serjeant had outlived most of his brethren of the law; to which he replied, that if it had not been for his Majesty, he would probably have outlived the law itself. It would be rather an awkward compliment, if I were to express a wish that you may survive the law; but I do hope, you will outlive the present spirit of innovation, and afterwards enjoy many years of health, without which, (I speak from sad experience) there cannot be much happiness. Why, you have not, as you ought long since, to have been called to a higher station, it would be impertinent in me to enquire. Happily you are independent in fortune, as you are in spirit. As a mark of my humble respect for your estimable character, I take the liberty of inscribing to you the following pages, and am,

Sir,

Your faithful and obedient Servant.

THE EDITOR.

P. S. The foregoing was written above a year ago, but the publication has been delayed. In the mean time, I have heard with deep regret that, through severe illness, you have found it necessary to retire from the exercise of your professional labours. I earnestly wish you every consolation, in addition to that which you must already feel, from the consciousness of a well-spent and honourable life.

GRAY'S INN.

12th December, 1835.

L.

CONTENTS.

Observations on Precedents and Authorities, by John Burke,

Esq. a Pamphlet, republished, consisting of .

26

A letter to a Member of Parliament, containing a proposal for

repealing certain obsolete statutes, called the Ten Command-

ments,—by the reverend John Hildrop. A Pamphlet, repub-

lished, containing

31

An Essay on the Constitution of England, a pamphlet, repub-
lished, containing

36

Remarks on the preceding, with observations on Petitions-on

Levelling Principles-the Authority of Government-the

Rights of the Clergy, and claims of Dissenters.-- By the Editor 5

The case stated of the Jurisdiction of the House of Lords, on the

point of Impositions, by Lord Hollis, republished, containing.

Thoughts on Trial by Jury and unanimity-in which are noticed

the opinions of Mr. Longley and Mr. Bentham-on "Jury

Trial in general; and the incompetence of Juries in certain

cases--Remarks on questions of Libel, and on the Press.-

By the Editor ..

1 to 24

On Coroner's Inquests and Deodands.-By the Editor .

24 to 26

On Evidence of Hand-writing-on Similitude of Hand-writings,

and of examining all the Witnesses to Instruments.--By the

Editor

26 to 34

Of blasphemous, immoral, and seditious Publications; including

a charge delivered by the late Lord Radnor

35 to 42

Dissertations on Moral and Metaphysical Subjects.-Anonymous 1 to 23

Note 1.-Containing Remarks on Doctor Pettingal's opinion

respecting Juries .

24

Note II.-Containing opinions of Mr. Bentham, as to packing

Juries; respecting the Judges, and on Writs of Error . 24 to 26

b

« AnteriorContinuar »