"Hawbuck Grange:", Or, The Sporting Adventures of Thomas Scott, Esq

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Bradbury, Agnew, 1847 - 329 páginas

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Página 318 - O gentle Sleep, Nature's soft nurse, how have I frighted thee, That thou no more wilt weigh my eyelids down. And steep my senses in forgetfulness...
Página 317 - The curfew tolls the knell of parting day, The lowing herd winds slowly o'er the lea, The ploughman homeward plods his weary way, And leaves the world to darkness and to me. Now fades the glimmering landscape on the sight, And all the air a solemn stillness holds, Save where the beetle wheels his droning flight, And drowsy tinklings lull the distant folds...
Página 35 - They were now upon the moors, with nothing to fear but bogs and holes, and ruts, things that did not seem to be included in the list of casualties of the Goose and Dumpling Hunt, for all the members began charging abreast instead of following in the goose fashion they had been pursuing before. The hounds were long out of sight; indeed, they had run up a ravine, from which the detour by Bewdley Bridge had interposed a hill; but the fatties saw by the staring of the sheep the line they had taken, and...
Página 17 - HARRIERS, to be good, like all other hounds, must be kept to their own game : if you run fox with them, you spoil them. Hounds cannot be perfect, unless used to one scent, and one stile of hunting.
Página 36 - I'll show you the hare,' said he. Accordingly, Scott followed him through a narrow defile to the left, and, looking over a hollow in the rocky hill upon the country below, he saw poor puss dribbling along in a listening sort of canter. The field followed to partake of the treat. 'Oh, she's a fine-un!' exclaimed Mr. Trumper, his eyes sparkling as he spoke; 'but she's pretty well beat...
Página 17 - Harriers, to be, good, like all other hounds, must be kept to their own game. If you run fox with them, you spoil them. Hounds cannot be perfect unless used to one scent, and one style of hunting. Harriers run fox in so different a style from hare, that it is of great disservice to them when they return to hare again. It makes them wild, and teaches them to skirt. The high scent which a fox leaves, the straightness of his running, the eagerness of the pursuit, and the noise that generally accompanies...
Página 113 - I've thrown up politics and devote myself to draining and d ing him instead." What Peel, for his part, thought of Mr. Scott and his like, may be judged from one of his letters to his wife at this time, in which he asks, with contemptuous exasperation, how those who pass their time in hunting, shooting and drinking can know the motives of those responsible...
Página 249 - ... themselves into a sort of mutual assistance society, and keeping with the hounds was all they looked to. The rest of the apricot coats took warning by their fellow, and discontinued the pioneering trade. Good farming is certainly a great promoter of hunting. Instead of high, rough, ragged, briarchoked, water-soughed fences, through which a horse can scarcely bore, and which occupy no end of ground, our friends now got among nice, level, well-laid, well-pleached fences, that a horse could both...
Página 37 - That'll puzzle them," said Mr. Trumper, "for the scent is but cold at best, and the wet of yon furrow won't improve what little there is." " But you'll let them hunt it of course?" observed Scott, thinking Mr. Trumper was paving the way to a little assistance. " Undoubtedly," replied Trumper, with a deep sideway inclination of the head — " undoubtedly," repeated Trumper, " We'd scorn to take an unfair advantage of her.
Página 296 - We may say, with our excellent friend Peter Morris, that " if putting our Christian name and surname at the beginning of a book were necessary conditions to the dignity of authorship, we should never be one while we live.

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