Imágenes de página
PDF
ePub

LESSON 88.

248. 1. Render the following Extract into correct Prose, according to Directions No. 241.

2. Give an Analysis, and adduce critical 06servations, according to Directions No. 242.

249. COUNTRY SCENERY,
How oft upon yon eminence our pace
Has slacken’d to a pause, and we have borne
The ruffling wind, scarce conscious that it blew,
While Admiration feeding at the eye,
And still unsated, dwelt npon the scene !
Thence with what pleasure have we just discern'd
The distant plough slow-moving, and beside
His labouring team, that swerv'd not from the track,
The sturdy swain diminish'd to a boy!
Here Ouse, slow winding through a level plain
Of spacious meads with cattle sprinkled o’er,
Conducts the eye along his sinuous course
Delighted. There, fast rooted in his bank
Stand, never overlook’d, our favourite elms
That screen the herdsman's solitary hut ;
While far beyond, and overthwart the stream,
That, as with molten glass, inlays the vale,
The sloping land recedes into the clouds ;
Displaying on its varied side the grace
Of hedge-row beauties numberless, square tower,
Tall spire, from which the sound of cheerful bells
Just undulates upon the listening ear,
Groves, heaths, and smoking villages remote.
Scenes must be beautiful, which daily view'd
Please daily, and whose novelty survives
Long knowledge and the scrutiny of years ;
Praise justly due to those that I describe.

LESSON 89. 250. 1. Render the following Extract into correct Prose, according to Directions No. 241.

2. Give an Analysis and Remarks on the leading topics and arguments, according to No. 242.

3. Observations on the Figures of Speech and Epithets employed, according to No. 242.

251. RURAL SOUNDS.

Nor rural sights alone, but rural sounds,
Exhilarate the spirit, and restore
The tone of languid nature. Mighty winds,
That sweep the skirt of some far-spreading wood
Of ancient growth, make music not unlike
The dash of Ocean on his winding shore,
And lull the spirit while they fill the mind;
Unnumber'd branches waving in the blast,
And all their leaves fast fluttering all at once.
Nor less composure waits upon the roar
Of distant floods, or on the softer voice
Of neighbouring fountain, or of rills that slip
Through the cleft rock, and, chiming as they fall
Upon loose pebbles, lose themselves at length
In matted grass, that with a livelier green
Betrays the secret of their silent course.
Nature inanimate employs sweet sounds,
But animated Nature sweeter still,
To soothe and satisfy the human ear.
Ten thousand warblers cheer the day and one
The livelong night ; nor these alone, whose notes
Nice-fingered Art must emulate in vain,
But cawing rooks, and kites that swim sublimo
In still repeated circles, screaming loud,
The jay, the pic, and e’en the boding owl,

[ocr errors]

That hails the rising moon, have charms for me.
Sounds inharmonious in themselves and harsh,
Yet heard in scenes where peace for ever reigns,
And only there, please highly for their sake.

LESSON 90.

252. 1. Render the following Extract into correct Prose, according to Directions No. 241.

2. Give an Analysis and Remarks on the leading topics and arguments, according to No. 242.

3. Observations on the Figures of Speech and Epithets employed, according to No. 242.

253. EXERTION NECESSARY.
By ceaseless action all that is subsists,
Constant rotation of the unwearied wheel,
That Nature rides upon, maintains her health,
Her beauty, her fertility. She dreads
An instant's pause, and lives but while she moves ;
Its own revolvency upholds the world,
The law, by which all creatures else are bound,
Binds man, the lord of all. Himself derives
No mean advantage from a kindred cause,
From strenuous toil his hours of sweetest ease.
The sedentary stretch their lazy length
When custom bids, but no refreshment find,
For none they need : the languid eye, the cheek
Deserted of its bloom, the flaccid, shrunk,
And withered muscle, and the vapid soul,
Reproach their owner with that love of rest,
To which he forfeits e'en that rest he loves.
Not such the alert and active. Measure life
By its true worth, the comfort it affords,
And theirs alone seems worthy of the name.
Good health, and, its associate in the most,

Good temper; spirits prompt to undertake,
And not soon spent, though in an arduous task,
The powers of fancy and strong thought are theirs ;
E'en age itself seems privileged in them
With clear exemption from its own defects.
A sparkling eye beneath a wrinkled front
The veteran shows, and, gracing a gray beard
With youthful smiles, descends toward the grave
Sprightly, and old almost without decay.

LESSON 91.

254. 1. Render the following Extract into correct Prose, according to Directions No. 241.

2. Give an Analysis and Remarks on the leading topics and arguments, according to No. 242.

3. Observations on the Figures of Speech and Epithets employed, according to No. 242.

255. PRAISE OF ENGLAND,

England, with all thy faults, I love thee still,
My country! and while yet a nook is left,
Where English minds and manners may be found,
Shall be constrain’d to love thee. Though thy clime
Be fickle, and thy year most part deform'd
With dripping rains, or wither'd by a frost,
I would not yet exchange thy sullen skies,
And fields without a flower, for warmer France
With all her vines; nor for Ausonia's groves
Of golden fruitage, and her myrtle bowers.
To shake thy senate, and from heights sublime
Of patriot eloquence to flash down fire
Upon thy foes, was never meant my task ;
But I can feel thy fortunes, and partake

Thy joys and sorrows, with as true a heart
As any thunderer there. And I can feel
Thy follies too ; and with a just disdain
Frown at effeminates, whose very looks
Reflect dishonour on the land I love.
How in the name of soldiership and sense,
Should England prosper, when such things, as smooth
And tender as a girl, all essenced o'er
With odours, and as profligate as sweet,
Who sell their laurel for a myrtle wreath,
And love when they should fight; when such as these
Presume to lay their hand upon the ark
Of her magnificent and awful cause ?
Time was when it was praise and boast enough
In every clime, and travel where we might,
That we were born her children. Praise enough
To fill the ambition of a private man,
That Chatham's language was his mother tongue,
And Wolfe's great name compatriot with his own.

LESSON 92. 256. 1. Render the following Extract into correct Prose, according to Directions No. 241.

2. Give an Analysis and Remarks on the leading topics and arguments, according to No. 242.

3. Observations on the Figures of Speech and Epithets employed, according to No. 242.

257. WINTER
O Winter! ruler of th' inverted year,
Thy scatter'd hair with sleet-like ashes fill’d,
Thy breath congeal'd upon thy lips, thy cheeks
Fring'd with a beard made white with other snows
Than those of age, thy forehead wrapp'd in clouds,
A leafless branch thy sceptre, and thy throne

« AnteriorContinuar »