The History of the Rebellion and Civil Wars in England, Volumen 3,Número 1

Portada
At the Clarendon Press, 1807
 

Comentarios de usuarios - Escribir una reseña

No hemos encontrado ninguna reseña en los sitios habituales.

Páginas seleccionadas

Otras ediciones - Ver todo

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 167 - ... that he would not deceive or cozen them by the perplexed and involved expressions in his commission, to fight for king and parliament;" and therefore told them, " that if the king chanced to be in the body of the enemy that he was to charge, he would as soon discharge his pistol upon him, as any other private person; and if their conscience would not permit them to do the like, he advised them not to list themselves in his troop, or under his command...
Página 385 - He had a tenderness and compassion of nature, which restrained him from ever doing a hard-hearted thing: and therefore he was so apt to grant pardon to malefactors, that the judges of the land represented to him the damage and insecurity to the public that flowed from such his indulgence. And then he...
Página 33 - And the men of Israel answered the men of Judah, and said, We have ten parts in the king, and we have also more right in David than ye: why then did ye despise us, that our advice should not be first had in bringing back our king? And the words of the men of Judah were fiercer than the words of the men of Israel.
Página 33 - And all the men of Judah answered the men of Israel, Because the king is near of kin to us: wherefore then be ye angry for this matter ? have we eaten at all of the king's cost! or hath he given us any gift...
Página 533 - ... that the judgment he was the next day to suffer was but an easy prologue to that which he was to undergo afterwards." After many such barbarities, they offered to intercede for him to the kirk upon his repentance, and to pray with him ; but he too well understood the form of their common...
Página 273 - He sent a list of the names of those his servants which he desired might be admitted to come to him, and attend upon him; whereof the duke of Richmond, the marquis of Hertford, the earls of Southampton and Lindsey, were the chief; all four gentlemen of his bedchamber, and of his privy council.
Página 109 - Westminster, forming a new catechism, and scheme of religion,) ever ventured to make any answer to it ; nor is it indeed to be answered, but must remain to the world's end, as a monument of the learning, courage, and loyalty, of that excellent place, against the highest malice and tyranny that was ever exercised in or over any nation...
Página 110 - ... virtue and had inclination to that duty and obedience they had never been taught ; so that when it pleased God to bring King Charles...
Página 535 - ... persuaded the king, who was enough afflicted with the news, and all the circumstances of it, that he might sooner take revenge upon that people by a temporary complying with them and going to them...
Página 141 - ... to Cromwell and his party. But the other fide meant not to maintain their refolution by difcourfes, well knowing where their...

Información bibliográfica