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XCI.

And thou, my friend !(19)— since unavailing woe
Bursts from my heart, and mingles with the strain-
Had the sword laid thee with the mighty low,
Pride might forbid ev’n Friendship to complain :
But thus unlaureld to descend in vain,
By all forgotten, save the lonely breast,
And mix unbleeding with the boasted slain,

While Glory crowns so many a meaner crest!
What hadst thou done to sink so peacefully to rest ?

XCII.

Oh, known the earliest, and esteem'd the most!
Dear to a heart where nought was left so dear!
Though to my hopeless days for ever lost,
In dreams deny me not to see thee here!
And Morn in secret shall renew the tear
Of Consciousness awaking to her woes,
And Fancy hover o'er thy bloodless bier,
Till
my

frail frame return to whence it rose, And mourn'd and mourner lie united in

repose.

XCIII.
Here is one fytte of Harold's pilgrimage:
Ye who of him may further seek to know,
Shall find some tidings in a future page,
If he that rhymeth now may scribble moe.
Is this too much ? stern Critic! say not so:
Patience ! and ye shall hear what he beheld
In other lands, where he was doom'd to go:

Lands that contain the monuments of Eld,
Ere Greece and Grecian arts by barbarous hands were quell’d.

END OF CANTO I.

CANTO II.

Childe Harold's Pilgrimage.

A ROMAUNT.

CANTO JI.

I.
COME, blue-eyed maid of heaven !—but thou, alas !
Didst never yet one mortal song inspire-
Goddess of Wisdom ! here thy temple was,
And is, despite of war and wasting fire, (1)
And
years,

that bade thy worship to expire:
But worse than steel, and flame, and ages slow,
Is the dread sceptre and dominion dire

Of men who never felt the sacred glow That thoughts of thee and thine on polish'd breasts bestow.(2)

F

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