Imágenes de página
PDF
ePub

these principles is attended with a perspicuous summary of the facts and arguments, on which they are based ; together with occasional remarks on the objections, which have been made from time to time. In selecting facts in confirmation of the principles laid down, I have sought those, which not only had a relation to the point in hand, but which promised a degree of interest for young minds. Simplicity and uniformity of style has been aimed at, although in a few instances the statements of the writers referred to have been admitted with only slight variations, when it was thought they had been peculiarly happy in them. As my sole object was the good of young men, I did not feel at liberty to prejudice the general design, by rejecting the facts, arguments, and in some cases even the expressions of others.

THOMAS C. UPHAM.

[merged small][ocr errors][merged small]

Great pains have been taken with this new edition. The more important improvements, contained in the larger work in two volumes, have been introduced into this. Teachers will find it, in some respects, essentially altered from any former impression ; and this may occasion a temporary inconvenience, as different editions cannot be used in the same class.' But it is hoped they will be willing to overlook this, in consideration of the decided improvements, which they may expect to meet with in various parts of the work. In a treatise embracing such a multiplicity of topics, it it conld hardly be expected, that the first attempts would be so successful as to leave nothing for further and more exact inquiry.

[ocr errors]

CONTENTS

[ocr errors]

tity

[ocr errors]

27

INTRODUCTION. 1 or belief of personal existence 18

CHAP. 1--UTILITY OF MENTAL Primary truth of personal iden-

PHILOSOPHY,

19

SECT. Reasons for regarding this a pri-

Objects of this science and objec- mary truth

20

tions against it

Of the existence of matter. 21

Its supposed practical inutility 2 There are original and authorita-
Its supposed practical in utility an- / tive grounds of belief

22
swered

3 Primary truths having relation to

Mental Philosophy tends to grati- the reasoning power

23

sy a reasonable curiosity 4 No beginning or change of exist-

Further grounds for this view 5 ence without a cause

24

Mental Philosophy teaches us Occasions of the origin of the pri-

where to limit our inquiries 6 mary truth of effects and causes 25

Remarks of Mr. Locke on this Matter and mind have uniform

point.

71 and fixed laws

26

Helps us in the correction of men- This primary truth not founded

tal errours

on reasoning

Is a help to those, who have the or the distinction between prima-

charge of early education 9 Ty and ultimate truths

28

Has a connection with other de-

partments of science

10

PART FIRST.

Mental science is a guide in our

intercourse with men

11 LAWS OF THE MIND.

Illustrates the nature and wisdom !

of the Creator

12 Chap. I.-IMMATERIALITY OF THE

Of the mental efforts necessary in !

MIND.

this study

13

of certain frivolous inquiries con-

II.-IMPLIED OR PRIMARY TRUTHS. cerning the nature of the mind 29

Origin & application of the terms,

Importance of certain preliminary material and immaterial 30

statements in mental philosophy 14 Difference between mind and mat-

Nature of such preliminary state- ! ter shown from language. 31

ments

15 Their different nature evinced by

Of the name or designation given their respective properties 32

them

16 The material quality of divisibility

Primary truth of personal exist. I not existing in the mind 33
ence

17 Opinions of Buffier on the soul's in-

Occasions of the origin of the idea a divisibility

34

CHAP. II.-LAWS OF THE MIND IN Nature and degrees of belief 65

GENERAL.

Of the objects of belief

| Of the laws of belief

67

Existence of laws even in material Consciousness a law of belief 68

objects

43 Of what is to be understood by

Objection from the apparent disor- Consciousness

ders in nature.

44 Consciousness properly a complex

Rerarks or Montesquieu on laws 45 state of the mind

70

hairs in relation to the mind. 46 of the proper objects or subjects of

Vental laws may be divided into consciousness

71

two classes

47 | The objects of consciousness wholly

Distinction between the susceptibil- ! internal and mental

72

ities and the laws of the mind 48 The beliet' from consciousness of the

most decided and highest kind 73

CHAP. III.-LAWS THAT LIMIT THE

MIND.

Chap. 1-LAWS OF BELIEF.

(II) THE SENSES.

Evidence of the general fact of the

mind's being limited.

49 General statement as to the confi-

Onjection to this inquiry from the dence placed in the senses 74

incompleteness of ihe mind's his. The belief arising from the senses

tory

50 may be considered in two res-

The mind limited as to its knowledge pects

of the essence or interiour nature Objection to reposing confidence in

of things
51 the senses

76

Oor knowledge of the nature of mind | The senses imperfect rather than

itself limited
52 fallacious

77

Remarks on the extent of this limi- Some alleged mistakes of the sen-

tation

53 ses owing to want of care. 78

On knowledge of matter in certain Of mistakes in judging of the mo-

respects limited
54 tion of objects

79

Our ignorance of the reciprocal con- Of mistakes as to the distances and
Dection of mind and matter 55 magnitude of objects

SO
Custrated in the case of voluntary The senses liable to be diseased 31
action

56 Our knowledge of the material

Further illustrations of our igno- l world from the senses

82

ranice in respect to this connec- Correctness of their testimony in

tion
57 this respect

83

Of space as a boundary of intellec- The senses as much grounds of be-
toaletfort

58 lief as other parts of our con-

Of the relation of time to our men- stitution

84

108

Opinions of Locke on the testimo- ' not necessary

104

ny of the senses

85 Of resemblance in the effects pro-

duced

105

Chap. VI-LAWS OF BELIEF.

Contrast the second general or

(III) TESTIMONY.

| primary law

106

Contiguity the third general or

Of testimony and the general fact I primary law

107

of its influencing belief 86 Cause and eflect the fourth prim-

of the various explanations of the lary law

origin of confidence in testimo-

ny

87 CAP. X-LAWS OF ASSOCIATION.

Connection of a reliance on testi-

(11) SECONDARY LAWS.

mony with a disposition to utter

the truth

88 Of secondary laws and their con-

This reliance greatly confirmed by I nection with the primary 109

experience

*89 Of the influence of the lapse of

Objections to our reliance on testi- / time

110

mony

90 Secondary law of repetition or

Further remarks on this objec | habit

tion

91 Of the secondary law of co-exis-

tentemotion

112

CHAP. VII-LAWS OF BELIEF. Original dillerence in the mental

(IV) MEY RY.

constitution

113

The foregoing law as applicable to

All men place a reliance on mem the intellect

114

ory

92 Of'associations suggesied by pres-

Limitations of our reliance on ent objects of perception 115

memory

93 Causes of increased vividness in the

Origin of men's reliance on mem- | foregoing instances

116

ory
Memory the occasion of belief far Chap. XI.-LAW OF HABIT.

ther ihan what is actually re-

membered

95 General view of the law of habit

Land of its application

117

CHAP. VIII-LAWS OF BELIEF. Ilustrations of the law of habit 113

(V) RELATIVE SUGGESTION AND | Application of this law to feelings

REASONING.

or emotions

119

111

94

153

The mental states divided into 1 ly in the mind

144

the intellectual and sentient 127 Sensations are not images or re-

Evidence in favour of this classifi- ' semblances &c. of objects 145

cation from what we observe in The connection between the

men generally

128 mental and physical change

This classification frequently re- l not capable of explanation 146

cognized in writers

129 Of the meaning of perception 147

Laoguages referred to in proof of of the primary and secondary

this generic arrangement 130 qualities of matter

148

The nature of this classification a or the secondary qualities of

matter of consciousness 131 / matter

149

of the different names given of the nature of mental powers

to it

l or faculties

Classification of the intellectual

states of the mind

133

Chap. III-THE SENSES OF SMELL

AND TASTE.

PART SECOND.

| Nature and importance of the

INTELLECTUAL STATES OF

senses as a source of knowledge 151

THE MIND.

Of lhe connection of the brain with

sensation and perception 152

CLASS FIRST

Order in which the senses are to

be considered

INTELLECTUAL STATES OF INTER-

NAL ORIGIN.

smell

154

01' perceptions of smell in distinc-

ORIGIN OF KNOWLEDGE IN GEN tion from sensations

155


ERAL.

or the sense and the sensations

of taste

156

Of the mind considered in itself 134 Design and uses of the senses of

Connection of the mind with the smell and taste

157

material world

135

of the origin or beginnings of

knowledge

Chap. IV-THE SENSE OF

Our first knowledge in general of

HEARING.

a material or external origin 137

Further proof of the beginnings of Organ of the sense of hearing 158

knowledge from external cau. Nature of sonorous bodies and the

ses

133 medium of the communication of

The same subject further illustra- | sound

159

ted

139 Varieties of the sensation of

Of connatural or innate knowl- sound

160

edge

140 Manner in which we learn the

The doctrine of innate knowledge place of sounds

161

Dot susceptible of proof 141 Application of these views to the

The discussion of this subject su- 1 art of ventriloquism

162

perseded and unnecessary 142 Uses of hearing and its connec-

Further remarks on the rise of tion with oral language 163

knowledge by means of the

senses

142 Chap. V-THE SENSE OF TOUCH.

Chap. II-SENSATION AND PER Tor the sense of touch & the sen-

CEPTION.

sations in general

164

The idea of externality or outness

Sensation a simple mental state I suggested by the sense of
originating in the senses 143 touch

165

AD sensation is properly and tru- The idea of externality or outness

[ocr errors]
« AnteriorContinuar »