Beyond Anne Frank: Hidden Children and Postwar Families in Holland

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University of California Press, 16 ene. 2007 - 406 páginas
The image of the Jewish child hiding from the Nazis was shaped by Anne Frank, whose house—the most visited site in the Netherlands— has become a shrine to the Holocaust. Yet while Anne Frank's story continues to be discussed and analyzed, her experience as a hidden child in wartime Holland is anomalous—as this book brilliantly demonstrates. Drawing on interviews with seventy Jewish men and women who, as children, were placed in non-Jewish families during the Nazi occupation of Holland, Diane L. Wolf paints a compelling portrait of Holocaust survivors whose experiences were often diametrically opposed to the experiences of those who suffered in concentration camps.

Although the war years were tolerable for most of these children, it was the end of the war that marked the beginning of a traumatic time, leading many of those interviewed here to remark, "My war began after the war." This first in-depth examination of hidden children vividly brings to life their experiences before, during, and after hiding and analyzes the shifting identities, memories, and family dynamics that marked their lives from childhood through advanced age. Wolf also uncovers anti-Semitism in the policies and practices of the Dutch state and the general population, which historically have been portrayed as relatively benevolent toward Jewish residents. The poignant family histories in Beyond Anne Frank demonstrate that we can understand the Holocaust more deeply by focusing on postwar lives.
 

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For those interested in research as to what really went on in Holland during the Holocaust and afterwards, this book is a must read. The author did a remarkable job in interviewing survivors of the ... Leer reseña completa

Índice

1 The History and Memory of Hidden Children
11
The Netherlands and the Jews
54
The Jews and the Netherlands
95
Memories of Occupation War and Hiding
126
When Both Parents Returned
163
When One Parent Returned
203
Orphans Living with Families
228
Life in Jewish Orphanages
273
From the Personal to the Political
293
Conclusion
329
Notes
347
Glossary
361
References
365
Index
381
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Página 13 - If haunting describes how that which appears to be not there is often a seething presence, acting on and often meddling with taken-forgranted realities, the ghost is just the sign, or the empirical evidence if you like, that tells you a haunting is taking place.
Página 12 - Haunting is a constituent element of modern social life. It is neither premodern superstition nor individual psychosis; it is a generalizable social phenomenon of great import. To study social life one must confront the ghostly aspects of it.
Página 13 - The ghost is not simply a dead or a missing person, but a social figure, and investigating it can lead to that dense site where history and subjectivity make social life.

Sobre el autor (2007)

Diane L. Wolf is Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Davis, and the author of the award-winning Factory Daughters: Gender, Household Dynamics, and Rural Industrialization in Java (UC Press). She is the editor of Feminist Dilemmas in Fieldwork and coeditor of Sociology Confronts the Holocaust: Memories, Identities and Diasporas (2007).

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