The Sea-Side Lesson Book: Designed to Convey ... a Knowledge of the Nature and Uses of the Common Things of the Sea Coast, Etc

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Groombridge & Sons, 1856 - 236 páginas
 

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Página 94 - They that go down to the sea in ships, That do business in great waters ; These see the works of the Lord, And his wonders in the deep.
Página 62 - THERE is much useful exchange between different nations, which we call Commerce. All countries will not produce the same things ; but, by means of Exchanges, each country may enjoy all the produce of the others. Cotton would not grow here, except in a hot-house. It grows in the fields in America ; but the Americans cannot spin and weave it so cheaply as we can ; because we have more skill and better machines. It answers best, therefore, for them to send us the cotton-wool...
Página 5 - I bring fresh showers for the thirsting flowers, From the seas and the streams; I bear light shade for the leaves when laid In their noonday dreams. From my wings are shaken the dews that waken The sweet buds every one, When rocked to rest on their mother's breast, As she dances about the sun.
Página 52 - Her white wings flying — never from her foes — She walks the waters like a thing of life, And seems to dare the elements to strife.
Página 159 - The ermine is of the genus mustela, (weasel,) and resembles the common weasel in its form ; is from fourteen to sixteen inches from the tip of the nose to the end of the tail. The body is from ten to twelve inches long.
Página 62 - America, we should have no cotton ; the carriage of it would cost more than it is worth. Think how many horses would be wanted to draw such a load as comes in one ship ; and they must eat, and rest, while they were travelling. But the winds are the horses which carry the ship along ; and they cost us nothing but to spread a sail.
Página 62 - It answers best, therefore, for them to send us the cotton-wool, and they take in exchange part of the cotton made into cloth ; and thus both we and they are best supplied. Tea, again, comes from China, and sugar from the West Indies ; neither of them could be raised here without a hot-house. No more can oranges, which come from Portugal, and other southern countries. But we get all these things in exchange for knives, and scissors, and...
Página 62 - ... thus both we and they are best supplied. Tea, again, comes from China, and sugar from the West Indies ; neither of them could be raised here without a hot-house. No more can oranges, which come from Portugal, and other southern countries. But we get all these things in exchange for knives, and scissors, and cloth, which we can make much better and cheaper than the Chinese, and West Indians, and Portuguese : and so both parties are better off than if they made every thing at home. How useful water...
Página 19 - Then said Ahaziah the son of Ahab unto Jehoshaphat, Let my servants go with thy servants in the ships. But Jehoshaphat would not.

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