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"The letter which you have dutifully addressed to Us in testimony of the joy and exultation which Our elevation to the supreme dignity of the Head of the Church has caused you, has been felt by Us, and filled Our heart with satisfaction. It has given Us a distinguished proof of your respect and veneration for the Holy See, as well as of your filial affection for our person. But what in this letter has, above all, filled Our soul with joy, is, that we have clearly seen in it how much you have at heart to contribute, with all your means, to render more and more flourishing the Association for the Propagation of the Faith, which has always been the object of Our liveliest interest. We commend, exceedingly, in the Lord, this remarkable zeal which you have shown for it; and We wish that you should know, that for everything which could be suitable to increase the prosperity and splendour of the Association, as far as depends on Our will, you can fully count on Our concurrence. Responding, moreover, to the testimony of the zeal which has dictated to you your words, by an equal expression of Our paternal Benevolence, We grant you all, affectionately and from the bottom of Our heart, Our Apostolic

Benediction."

Given at Rome, at St Mary's the Greater, the 19th of August, in the year 1846, being the First of Our Pontificate. "PIUS P. P. IX."

LETTER OF HIS HOLINESS TO THE CENTRAL COUNCIL OF LYONS.

Pius IX. POPE.

"Dearly Beloved Sons, Health and Apostolical Benediction.

"It is with much gratification that We have received, as a testimony of your pious affection and regard for Us, your dutiful congratulations on Our elevation through a Divine dispensation, to the Supreme Pontificate of the Church. We have been very sensible to this act of duty, both because we have understood that it proceeded from your veneration for this Apostolic See, as well as because we have borne a pateri al interest and zeal for the Society for the Propagation of the Faith, instituted at the commencement in your city of Lyons, and which you glory in rendering daily more and more flourishing by your untiring labours. Knowing, then, with consolation, the abundant and salutary fruits which, with the aid of the Lord, this Society produces, We most willingly take this occasion to give it a pledge and new proof of Our special solicitude, and We wish that you should be persuaded that nothing will be more agreeable to Us than to protect and favor it with all Our power, according as We shall judge it best, in the Lord. In the meantime, We lovingly give you, dearly beloved sons, from the bottom of our heart, the Apostolic Benediction, as a foretoken of all the heavenly gifts, and a testimony of Our paternal and special affection towards you.

"Given at Rome, at St. Mary's the Greater, on the 19th day of August, in the year 1846, being the first of Our Pontificate. 64 PIUS P.P. IX."

PROGRESS OF POPERY.-The Edinburgh Evening Post has the following curious confession :"Popery, at one time apparently paralysed and moribund, is at present vigorous and alert, at least in these kingdoms; and while the religious enlightenment of the age might seem sufficient to drive it back into its former realms of chaos and old night,' co-existent with the spread of every kind of knowledge is a rapid increase of the memincrease of the institutions by which the system is bers of the Popish communion, and an astounding supported. Around us on every hand rise Masshouses, colleges, and monastic institution for both There are schools for the young-asylums for the orphan-fald-stool to the pauper, and a throne for the wealthy-Crowds flock the chapels

sexes.

convertions proceed with fearful rapidity-and men stand alarmed and aghast in the contemplation of facts which speak of evils more widely spread than themselves, and as mysterious and hidden as they are over and undisputed. Nor may we expect that silent proselytism will exhaust the ambition of Popery. We may soon have in an element, once impregnated with Scriptural Protestantism, the public processions in which Romanism vaunts itself. To show that this is no idle surmise, we give the following paragraph from an English provincial paper:-The first effects of the bill that lately passed through Parliament were shown last week by the procession of a Roman Catholic Guild through Radford. The procession was headed by cross-bearers, singing the Litany of the Blessed Virgin. the late relaxation of the laws against the Roman Catholics will make these attempts at seduction of the people not unfrequent.' Some there are who might be brought over to Popery even by a street procession."

BRITISH AND IRISH CATHOLICS IN PARIS.-By the returns issued in France, it appears that 28,000 British and Irish inhabitants are in Paris and its environs. Many of these are, of course, "birds of passage;" but still there is constantly a fixed and abiding population small portion of these are English and Irish Catholics, of many thousands in the French metropolis. No who carry even there with them-as they habitually carry everywhere else—their religious fidelity and their thirst for knowledge. But, unfortunately for them, they have no school in Paris, nor have they any opportunity of attending any chapel where instructions or sermons are given in English. They are mostly of a class commanding the deepest sympathy, inasmuch as they cannot help themselves. The Rev. Mr. Sullivan is now in London for the purpose of collecting funds to establish such a school. He is well known in Paris, and a graduate of a French College. This is another instance of the universality of the Irish Missionary spirit. In an early number we shall be able to give further details. In the mean time, the merits of the proposed undertaking requires no recommendation beyond that which it intrinsically possesses. The Presbyterians have two such establishments in Paris, and they are not very scrupulous in the means they adopt to promote their views. They practise something of the Farnham system of Proselytes. Notes many years ago the English and Scotch had one College in Paris, and the Irish three.

SHEERNESS.-The Rev. J. Caunt has been presented by the Catholics of Mile-town, whose pastor he has just ceased to be, with a testimonial of gratitude and respect.

REVIEW.

The Voice of God to the Heart of his Servants who aspire to Perfection. p.p. 262. Perry, Red Lion Square, London.

This devotional volume is based upon a small Latin work of Pawlowski, O. S. T. It consists of meditations and considerations arranged upon the plan of "The Spiritual Exercises" of St. Ignatius of Loyola. It has been placed in its present form by the Rev. J. Perry, and will afford rich consolation to many a contrite spirit, and heart aspiring to perfection. It blends the trite beauties of Pascal with the practical usefulness of trusty Roderiguez. The Rev. Mr. Perry is pastor of the congregation at Aston-le-Walls, near Banbury, and is another proof of the excellent missionaries who were trained at Creswell, under the Rev. Mr. Baddeley, and the Right Rev. Dr. Wareing. Handbook of Friendly Societies. Simpkin & Marshall. The title of this work is a lengthy one. It purports to be "a familiar Exposition of the various Laws

enacted from time to time for the Formation and Government of such Associations; with Rules and Instructions for the guidance of Officers, Trustees, Treasurers, and Members-Tables of Sickness and Mortality-Rates of Contributions and Benefits-the latest Regulations issued by the Registrar-Forms of Award, Schedules, &c.-Tables and Rules published by the Lords of the Treasury. To which is appended the Laws of Building Societies." The highest praise we can bestow upon the book is, that it performs all which is promised in the title. It is the best treatise we have seen upon the very engrossing subject to which it refers.

DOLMAN'S MAGAZINE.-The next number of this Magazine will be a specimen of the editorial abilities of the Rev. Mr. Price, of Lincoln's Inn Fields. The announcement of the departure of the late editor is rather magniloquent, and we know that the "manifold duties of editorship" will suffer no deterioration by their being transferred to the Rev. Mr. Price.

own congaegation, and a well directed magazine its own circle of subscribers; and it may be that neither Dolman's, nor certainly the general cause, would suffer, if another work were set on foot, in a larger and generous spirit of emulation. In the starting of such a work, however, I must, for the reasons I have mentioned, decline (at least this moment, and under exist. ing circumstances) to take a leading part.-I have the honour to be, dear Sir, your most faithful servant, London, November, 1846.

M. G. KEON.

NOURISHMENT OF FOOD.

THE wholesome or unwholesome character of any aliment depends, in a great measure, on the state of the digestive organs, in any given case. Sometimes, a particular kind of food is called wholesome, because it produces a beneficial effect of a particular character on the system of an individual. In this case, however, it is to be considered as a medicine, and can be called wholesome only for those whose systems are in the same condition. Very often a simple aliment is made indigestible by artificial cookery. Aliments abounding in fat are unwholesome, because fat resists the operation of the gastric juice. The addition of too much spice makes many an innocent aliment injurious, because spices resist the action of the digestive organs, and produce an irritation of particular parts of the system. In any given case, the digestive power of the individual is to be considered, in order to determine whether a particular aliment is unwholesome or not. In general, we can only say that aliment is healthy which is easily soluble, and is suited to the power of digestion of the individual; and, in order to render the aliment perfect, the nutritious parts must be mixed up with a nourishment, to fill the stomach; because there is no certain quantity of innocent substance, affording no doubt that many persons injure their health by taking too much nutritious food. In this case, the nutritious parts, which cannot be dissolved, act precisely like food which is, in itself, indigestible.

food is according to the quantity: a person may eat a It is a very mistaken idea that the nourishment in deal of some articles, and receive very little nourishment from them. The quantity of nourishment depends

In connexion with this matter the following letter greatly on the aromatic flavour contained in food; and has appeared:

"To the Editor of the Tablet"

SIR. When it was known, about two months ago, that I intended to relinquish the editorship of Dolman's Magazine, some wishes were expressed, in quarters entitled to consideration, that I should place myself at the head of a new Catholic periodical. As this suggestion has since then been pressed more frequently, permit me through your columns to state, that my separation from Dolman's Magazine is entirely amicable, and my own act. I had not time for everything, and I gave up what appeared to me the least important. Besides, as long as Dolman's continues to be administered in its present spirit, how could I, with any grace, lend myself to a proceeding which-however praisworthy in itself-might, in the eyes of most people, wear the appearance of hostility?

The new Editor is a gentleman of whom I entertain great respect, and whose talents I have had the honour to place in a well-lit niche of the literary Temple. Independently of all this, I cannot but feel partial to a work for which I have laboured, and perhaps not wholy without effect.

At the same time, I do not mean to insinuate that the starting of a new periodical implies any intentional hostilito to the existing organ in the minds of the projectors. A place of worship, they say, creates its

whatever is insipid to the taste is of little service to the stomach. Now, the difference between good cookery and bad cookery lies principally in the development of the flavour of our food; articles properly cooked yield the whole of it: by good cookery we make the most of everything-by bad cookery, the least.

THEFT IN LONDON.-"It is is a sorrowful truth

that in London alone there are at present supposed to be upwards of three thousand receivers of stolen goods who keep open shops for the purpose of purchasing at under price, often for a mere trifle, every kind of pro perty brought to them-from a nail or glass bottle up to the most valuable article, new or old; and this without asking a question. The supposed amount of the different robberies committed in London and its environs in the course of a year is estimated at £2,000,000."—Reflections on Communities, &c.

SHORT IMPRISONMENT.-At the recent Radnorshire Sessions, in a painful case of attempt at selfdestruction, the offender was sentenced to be imprisoned for five minutes and discharged.

"COR SACRUM."

(Translated by W. Furlong.)

Whoe'er you be, for guilt and sin oppressed, And seek a quiet for your aching breast; Or from corroding cares of conscience fly, Just vengence due to sin, from Him on high. Recur to JESUs, to his wounded heart, Your sighs, your tears, your penitence impart: With lamb-like meekness it has bled for you"Tis right, oh sinner! you should suffer too. HEART of JESUS! was ever heart so meek! That prayed the Father for the wretches' sake ?Forgave, excused, and sought for mercy too, "Father! forgive, they know not what they do. Courage, oh soul! I hear his sacred call, "Come to me, sinners, heavy laden all And I'll refresh you in redemption's tide, Of blood and water, from my heart and side." Delight of HEART'S, in yon bright world of bliss: BLEST HEART of JESUS, hope of all in this; Behold! invited by your gracious call, We low approach, and mourn, and sinful fall. Oh! hear thou us, we of thy mercy crave, With thy own blood our souls immortal save; Give all new hearts, and sinless may they be, Who seek thy wounds, and hide their own in thee. Deptford.

Advertisements.

JOHN R. WILD,

FUNERAL ECONOMIST, 197, BLACKFRIAR'S ROAD,

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FIRST CLASS FUNERAL-Hearse and pair, coach and pair, for six Mourners; strong elm coffin, covered with black cloth, finished in handsome manner, fine mattress, pillow, and winding sheet, two mutes in silk dresses; superintendant with silk fittings, and other assistants, crape fittings, gloves, truncheons, &c. &c. velvet pall, cloaks, hat-bands, or hoods and scarfs for Mourners £8 0 0 This Class, Walking Funeral, with lid of feathers and pages £5 0 0 SECOND CLASS FUNERAL.-Respectable Funeral, one horse hearse and coach, good covered coffin, pall, mutes, fittings for six mourners, and every requisite, assistants, &c. £6 0 0 £3 3 0

..

This Class, Walking Funeral THIRD CLASS FUNERAL.-Decent Funeral, one horse hearse and coach, good coffin, pali, and fittings, for six mourners, and all requisites

This Class, Walking Funeral

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£4 0 0 £2 5 0

Just published, price Is. cloth,

The Voice of God to the Heart of

HIS SERVANTS WHO ASPIRE TO PERFECTION. By the REV. J. PERRY.

London: Published by S. Perry, 37, Red Lion Square; and sold by C. Dolman, T. Jones, and all Booksellers.

This Work has received the following approbation from the Right Rev. Dr. Wareing:---

"Having read the Work entitled The Voice of God to the Hearts of His Servants who aspire to Perfection,' by the Rev. J. Perry, we highly approve of the same, and commend it to the use of the Faithful of the Eastern District, as a help to piety, and a means of sanctification.--WILLIAM, Bishop of Ariopolis, Vicar Apostolic of the Eastern Diistrict.-Given at Northampton, November 9th, 1846.

To HOUSEEKEPERS. This Day-2s. Cloth, or 2s. 6d. Leather.

The Cook-Maid's Complete Guide,

and the Art of Cookery made Easy. Being the best and easiest methods of correctly performing all the business of the Cook-maid in respectable Families. With proper Instructions for Steaming, and the most exact directions for preparing to cook, for cooking and serving-up all sorts of Provision, from a single Joint of Meat, with Vegetables, to the finest seasoned dishes of Game, Poultry, Fish, Sauces, Soups, and Made Dishes.-Jellies and Custards; and also for making and baking Pies, Tarts, Patties, &c. The whole written from experience. By A LADY. London: DEAN & Co. Threadneedle-street: and all Booksellers.

Confectioners' and Pastry-Cook's

GUIDE; as practised at the best Establishments in London and Paris. With the Art of Sugar-Boiling. By GEORGE READ, Pastry-cook and Confectioner. 1s. 6d. cloth.

Biscuit and Gingerbread Baker's

ASSISTANT; a Work containing above one hundred useful practical receipts. By THOMAS SHOESMITH 1s. sewed.

Price Sixpence each, sewed. The

Housemaid's and Cookmaid's Com

PLETE GUIDE to the best and most approved methods of performing the various duties of the Housemaid and Cookmaid in respectable Families. 6d. each, sewed.

Cheap Cookery, for the Working

CLASSES; showing them how to cook a great variety of nice and nourishing Dishes, at little expense. An excellent book for Clergymen, Ladies, and others, for presents. By the author of "Cookery Made Easy." 6d. sewed.

London: DEAN & Co. Threadneedle-street: and all Booksellers..

Just published, priee 1s.,

FOURTH CLASS FUNERAL.-Decent Funeral The Hand-book of Friendly Societies

one horse hearse aud coach, smooth elm coffin, neatly finished, pall and fittings for six mourners and every requisite, assistants, &c.

This Class, Walking Funeral Children's Funerals, complete

£3 10 0 £2 0 0 12 6

The above Charges are most respectfully submitted to the Public and Members of Societies, at once showing the enormous saving to Families. No charge is made unless the most entire satisfaction is given. No Extras, and the greatest Punctuality. Three hours notice will procure every necessary article, (in case of emergency). The Establishment is well known to be the most extensive in London, and has been in the possession of the family of the present proprietor 150 years, and is thus spoken of by the Health of Towns' Commission:

"The nature of the expenses of Interments in London and their operation on the whole system are most fully developed by MR. WILD, who first volunteered the suggestion of reducing the expenses on an extensive scale."

being a Familiar Exposition of the various Laws enacted from time to time for the Formation and Government of such Associations; with Rules and Instructions for the Guidance of Officers, Trustees, Treasurers, and Members; Tables of Sickness and Mortality; Rates of Contributions and Benefits; the latest Regulations issued by the Registrar; Forms of Award, Schedules, &c.; Tables and Rules published by the Lords of the Treasury. To which is appended, THE LAWS OF BUILDING SOCIETIES.

"We have received a compact publication entitled 'The Hand-Book of Friendly Societies." It is admirably adapted to its purpose. It is in every sense a familiar and most useful

exposition of the various Laws for the formation and govern

ment of such Associations-is excellently and completely prepared, and sent forth at a remarkably moderate price."MORNING ADVERTISER.

"This little book is, beyond all question, the most useful of its kind which has ever issued from the press; and the publishers, Messrs. Simpkin and Marshall, deserve the thanks of that large class for whose instructions it is intended."- LLOYD'S WEEKLY LONDON NEWSPAPER.

London: Simpkin, Marshall, & Co.

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Gallery of German Art, for the Sale of Sacred Engravings.
HERING & REMINGTON, 137, REGENT STREET, LONDON.

Portrait of His Holiness POPE PIUS, IX.

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Portrait of His late Holiness POPE

GREGORY XVI..

LINE ENGRAVINGS.

La Nativite de la Vierge.

The History of Man, 8 plates

The East Judgment

The Crucifixion

The Birth of Christ.
Joseph and his Brethren
Joseph before Pharaoh
Saint Cecile

Maddaleine

Madonna della Scodella

Christ on the Cross

The Four Evangelists

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Published at the Office, 2, Crane Court, Fleet Street; and sold by all Booksellers, Stationers, Newsvenders in the United Kingdom. All communications for the Editor to be addressed to the Office, 2, Crane Court, Fleet Street.

THE NEW

WEEKLY CATHOLIC MAGAZINE.

No. 2.]

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1846.

[PRICE 14d.

"Go and teach all nations" is its divinely glorious charter, and as long as there is a land upon which the rays of true religion have not beamed, so long will the object of Catholic Mission remain unaccomplished. EDUCATION is the firstaye, almost the only means-piety excepted— by which such mighty works are to progress. In England the old funds for education are gone. The public have been swindled out of them. Of the few recognised educational resources which remain, the meretriciously precocious sons of a millionaire takes the place which should be filled by the poor man's son. For the present it cannot be helped, but better days are coming. If every body will do his best, and act upon the principle allere flammen, a great light; no ignis fatuus, but an enduring illumination, will shed its redeeming lustre throughout the surface of the land.

their fellows to read and to pray. In Ireland CATHOLIC EDUCATIONAL SOCIETIES. the schools (in the most persecuting times) sent forth sages; the sanctuaries sent forth No. 1.-SPANISH PLACE LITERARY SOCIETY. saints to spread the light of civilization, and The greatest impulse ever given to the pro- to diffuse the sweet odour of Christianity gression of the human mind, in England, through realms and unto people in which and since the days of the "Glorious Reforma- to whom the luxuries of either and the blesstion," was when RAIKES established Sundayings of both were unknown. The whole spirit Schools. The Established Church-men knew of Catholicism is missionary. well that if the current of education, conducted by Dissenters, once "set in" against them, their occupation would be Othello-ized. Hence they educated a portion of the people: not because they loved the extension of education, but because they found it necessary to give a pseudo instruction in order to uphold their own sway. Their object and mode of education brought them into collision with the object and mode of education pursued by the Dissenters. A rivalry was thus produced between the adorers of thirty-nine articleism and the disciples of dissent. The contest has been beneficial in its results; and although England-boastful, rich, and arrogant-is now one of the most ignorant, most uneducated, and most morally debased nations in Europe, she would have been in a "lower depth still" were it not that Dissent originally moved the at one time stagnant waters of Church-educational apathy. So long as a few could exercise even a partial monopoly of education, men were made dolts fitted to be dupes, and prostituted to be nothing better. Education has since spread. A breath has gone over the valley in which there was nothing but mental morbidness and death. By the influence of that reviving breath, life and healthfulness now prevail. The Catholics of England are at last beginning to re-assert, in modern times, their old prescriptive right and pre-eminence as educational pioneers. Not even in the darkest days of persecution did they allow the light of learning to be extinguished. Even upon the death-places of the martyrs, the ornaments of the sanctuary fed the lamps of literature. When the penalty for teaching the Lord's prayer was confiscation-exile-a gibbet-a rope-or a knifemen were still found with the courage to teach

A great reservoir from which many currents of information have flown to be enjoyed by the people has been supplied by Mechanics' Institutes and similar establishments. Right glad we are to find that kindred institutions are rising and are likely to spread amongst the Catholic body. It is our intention to notice in detail as many of them as we can. Before us at present is a copy of the rules of "The Spanish Place Literary Society." It would be a sufficient recommendation of it to state that the Rev. T. J. REARDON is the president. We hope soon to enjoy his wit, and continue our admiration of his pious energies, at a festival to promote the interests of the institution. The society is a shop for the disposal of knowledge, "wholesale and retail." The subscription is six shillings a-year. The advantages offered are:

"1. The use, from seven to half-past nine on three

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