Bacterial Disease Mechanisms: An Introduction to Cellular Microbiology

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Cambridge University Press, 18 abr. 2002 - 692 páginas
This introductory textbook explores bacterial disease mechanisms and bacteria-host interactions. The central premise is that bacteria have evolved by means of manipulating normal host cell functions and overcoming host defense systems to ensure their survival. As well as offering a new perspective on the classical bacterial virulence mechanisms, this book outlines the new molecular techniques developed to unravel the complexity of bacteria-host interactions. Current research may lead not only to a better understanding of disease mechanisms, but also to new means of preventing and/or treating bacterial infections.

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Sobre el autor (2002)

Michael Wilson is currently Professor of Microbiology in the Faculty of Clinical Sciences, University College London, and Head of the Department of Microbiology at the Eastman Dental Institute, University College London. He is the co-editor of Community Structure and Co-operation in Biofilms, 2000 (0521793025) and editor of Bacterial Adhesion to Host Tissues, 2001 (0521801079). His main research interests are bacterial virulence factors, biofilms and the development of new antimicrobial strategies.

Brian Henderson is Professor of Cell Biology and Head of the Cellular Microbiology Research Group at the Eastman Dental Institute, University College London. His research centres around cytokine biology and the interactions of bacteria with myeloid and lymphoid cells.

Rod McNab is Lecturer in Molecular Microbiology at the Eastman Dental Institute, University College London, and works on streptococcal adhesion and colonization factors, biofilms and bacterial cell-cell communication.

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