Imágenes de página
PDF
ePub

There died my father, no man's debtor,
And there I'll die, nor worse nor better.'

To set this matter full before ye,
Our old friend Swift will tell his story.

“Harley, the nation's great support," —
But you may read it, _I stop short.

1 His father died in the house in 2 The rest is imitated by Swift. Mawson's Buildings, Chiswick, which Pope therefore says, “You may read the family had rented.

it in his poems."

IMITATIONS OF HORACE.

BOOK II., SATIRE VI.

THE FIRST PART IMITATED IN THE YEAR 1714, BY DR. SWIFT ;

THE LATTER PART ADDED AFTERWARDS.

IMITATIONS OF HORACE.

BOOK II., SATIRE VI.

THE FIRST PART IMITATED IN THE YEAR 1714, BY DR. SWIFT ;'

THE LATTER PART ADDED AFTERWARDS.

I've often wished that I had clear
For life, six hundred pounds a year,
A handsome house, to lodge a friend ;
A river at my garden's end ;
A terrace-walk, and half a rood
Of land, set out to plant a wood.

Well, now I have all this and more,
I ask not to increase my store;
But here a grievance seems to lie-
All this is mine, but till I die;
I can't but think 't would sound more clever,
To me and to my heirs for ever.'

If I ne'er got or lost a groat,
By any trick, or any fault;
And if I pray by reason's rules,
And not like forty other fools :
As thus, “ Vouchsafe, O gracious Maker!
To grant me this and t other acre :

[ocr errors]

3

15

i It must have been written before 3 These lines (13—28) are not in August, 1714, for Charles Ford writes the Imitation as printed in the Misto the Dean on the 5th of that month : cellanies. They have evidently been “Pray send me your poem, Hoc erat in added by Pope. The thought and votis, &c.; or bring it up yourself.' the manner are both unmistakeably

2 Contrast this sentiment with Pope's his. Imitation of Horace, 2 Sat. ii. 167-180.

Or, if it be thy will and pleasure,
Direct my plough to find a treasure :"
But only what my station fits,
And to be kept in my right wits.
Preserve, Almighty Providence !
Just what you gave me, competence:
And let me in these shades compose
Something in verse as true as prose :
Removed from all the ambitious scene,
Nor puffed by pride, nor sunk by spleen.

In short, I'm perfectly content,
Let me but live on this side Trent;
Nor cross the Channel twice a year,
To spend six months with statesmen here.

I must by all means come to town,
'Tis for the service of the Crown.
“Lewis,' the Dean will be of use,
Send for him up; take no excuse.
The toil, the danger of the seas;
Great ministers ne'er think of these;
Or let it cost five hundred pound,
No matter where the money 's found :
It is but so much more in debt,
And that they ne'er considered yet.'

40

ii.e., Let me not be obliged to feelings of his latter days, when these cross the Channel twice a year. verses were written. The negotia

Warton says : “He was perpetu- tion to which Warton refers took ally expressing his discontent at his place in 1732, and was part of a proIrish preferment, and forming schemes ject of Bolingbroke's, not of Swift's. for exchanging it for a smaller in See letter of Swift to Gay, dated Aug. England ; and courted Queen Caro- 12, 1732_Vol. ii. of Correspondence, line and Sir Robert Walpole to effect p. 281, footnote. such a change. A negotiation had Erasmus Lewis, the friend and nearly taken place between the Dean correspondent of Swift, who, being and a Mr. Talbot for the living of Under-Secretary of State in Harley's Burfield, in Berkshire. Mr. Talbot Government, kept the Dean informed, himself informed me of this negotia- when in Ireland, of all the machinery tion. Burfield is in the neighbourhood of intrigue which was working within of Bucklebury, Lord Bolingbroke's the Tory Ministry. seat." Swift, however, had scarcely 3 Referring to the expenses he had begun to entertain the discontented incurred in his move to Ireland. He

« AnteriorContinuar »