The Poetical Works of Mark Akenside, M.D.: In Two Volumes. Collated with the Best Editions:

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Printed at the Stanhope Press, by Charles Whittingham, ... for John Sharpe, 1808
 

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Página 18 - Through life and death to dart his piercing eye, With thoughts beyond the limit of his frame ; But that the Omnipotent might send him forth In sight of mortal and immortal powers, As on a boundless theatre, to run The great career of justice...
Página 31 - Amid the crowd of patriots ; and his arm Aloft extending, like eternal Jove When guilt brings down the thunder, call'd aloud On Tully's name, and shook his crimson steel, And bade the father of his country, hail ! For lo ! the tyrant prostrate on the dust, And Rome again is free...
Página 30 - Mind, mind alone, (bear witness, Earth and Heaven !) The living fountains in itself contains Of beauteous and sublime : here, hand in hand, Sit paramount the Graces ; here enthroned, Celestial Venus, with divinest airs, Invites the soul to never-fading joy.
Página 19 - Through mountains, plains, through empires black with shade, And continents of sand, will turn his gaze To mark the windings of a scanty rill That murmurs at his feet?
Página 23 - The orphan's portion ; of unquiet souls Risen from the grave to ease the heavy guilt Of deeds in life conceal'd ; of shapes that walk At dead of night, and clank their chains, and wave The torch of hell around the murderer's bed. At every solemn pause the crowd recoil, Gazing each other speechless, and congeal'd With shivering sighs : till eager for the event, Around the beldame all erect they hang, Each trembling heart with grateful terrors quell'd.
Página 91 - ... attentive mind, By this harmonious action on her powers Becomes herself harmonious: wont so oft In outward things to meditate the charm Of sacred order, soon she seeks at home To find a kindred order, to exert Within herself this elegance of love, This fair inspir'd delight : her lemper'd powers Refine at length, and every passion wears A chaster, milder, more attractive mien.
Página 88 - From things deform'd, or disarrange, or gross In species '. This, nor gems, nor stores of gold, Nor purple state, nor culture can bestow ; But GOD alone, when first his active hand Imprints the secret bias of the soul.
Página 20 - Rest at the fated goal. For from the birth Of mortal man, the Sovereign Maker said, That not in humble nor in brief delight, Not in the fading echoes of renown, Power's purple robes, nor pleasure's flowery lap, The soul should find enjoyment: but from these Turning disdainful to an equal good, Through all the ascent of things enlarge her view, Till every bound at length should disappear, And infinite perfection close the scene.
Página 16 - Imprints a different bias, and to each Decrees its province in the common toil. To some she taught the fabric of the sphere, The changeful Moon, the circuit of the stars, The golden zones of heaven ; to some she gave To weigh the moment of eternal things, Of time, and space, and fate's unbroken chain, And will's quick impulse; others by the hand She led o'er vales and mountains, to explore What healing virtue swells the tender veins Of herbs and flowers; or what the beams of morn Draw forth, distilling...
Página 135 - Thou, who the verdant plain dost traverse here, While Thames among his willows from thy view Retires; O stranger, stay thee, and the scene Around contemplate well. This is the place Where England's ancient barons, clad in arms And stern with conquest, from their tyrant king (Then render'd tame) did challenge and secure The charter of thy freedom.

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