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ON THE EYES OF Miss A- H 143

STANZAS TO JESSY

143

EGOTISM. A LETTER TO J. T. BECHER 114

QUERIES TO CASUISTS

145

THE ADIEU

145

TO A VAIN LADY

146

Το ANNE

147

TO THE SAME

147

TO THE AUTHOR OF A SONNET BE-

GINNING,

"SAD IS MY VERSE,

YOU

SAY,

AND YET NO TEAR

147

ON FINDING A FAN

148

FAREWELL TO THE MUSE

148

Το AN OAK AT NEWSTEAD

149

ON REVISITING HARROW

150

TO MY SON

150

SONG. BREEZE OF THE NIGHT,' ETC. 150

To HARRIET

151

• FAREWELL! IF EVER FONDEST

PRAYER'

151

• BRIGHT BE

THE PLACE OF Tuy

SOUL

151

• WHEN WE TWO PARTED'

151

*THERE WAS A TIME, I NEED NOT

NAME

152

• AND WILT THOU WEEP WHEN I AM

LOW?'

152

REMIND ME NOT, REMIND ME NOT' 152

TO A YOUTHFUL FRIEND

153

LINES INSCRIBED UPON A CUP FORMED

FROM A SKULL

153

INSCRIPTION ON THE MONUMENT OF

A NEWFOUNDLAND DOG

154

• WELL! THOU ART HAPPY

154

To A LADY, ON BEING_ASKED MY

REASON FOR QUITTING ENGLAND IN

THE SPRING

155

* FILL THE GOBLETY

155

STANZAS TO A LADY ON LEAVING

ENGLAND

156

LINES TO MR. HODGSON.

156

LINES WRITTEN IN AN ALBUM, AT

MALTA

157

To FLORENCE

157

STANZAS COMPOSED DURING A THU-

DER-STORM

158

STANZAS WRITTEN IN PASSING THE

AMBRACIAN GULF

159

*THE SPELL IS BROKE, THE CHARM

IS FLOWN'

159

THE GIRL OF CADIZ

159

WRITTEN AFTER SWIMMING

SESTOS TO ABYDOS

160

'MAID OF ATHENS, ERE WE PART' 160

FRAGMENT FROM THE MONK OF

ATHOS'

161

LINES WRITTEN BENEATH A PICTURE 161

SUBSTITUTE FOR AN EPITAPH

161

TRANSLATION OF THE FAMOUS GREEK

WAR SONG, Δεύτε παίδες των Ελλήνων 161

TRANSLATION OF THE ROMAIC SONG,

Μπένω μεσ' το περιβόλι, Ώραιοτάτη Χαηδή 162

LINES WRITTEN IN THE TRAVELLERS'

BOOK AT ORCHOMENUS

162

ON PARTING

162

EPITAPH FOR JOSEPH BLACKET

163

FAREWELL TO MALTA

163

NEWSTEAD ABBEY

164

EPISTLE TO A FRIEND

164

To THYRZA

165

• AWAY, AWAY, YE NOTES OF WOE!' 165

•ONE STRUGGLE MORE, AND I AM

FREE

166

EUTHANASIA

166

* AND THOU ART DEAD, AS YOUNG

AND FAIR'

167

LINES TO A LADY WEEPING . 168

IF SOMETIMES IN THE HAUNTS OF

168

ON A CORNELIAN HEART WHICH WAS

BROKEN

168

“THE CHAIN I GAVE:

168

LINES WRITTEN ON A BLANK LEAF

OF THE *PLEASURES OF MEMORY' 169

ADDRESS SPOKEN AT THE OPENING OF

DRURY-LANE THEATRE

169

PARENTHETICAL ADDRESS

170

VERSES FOUND IN A SUMMER-HOUSE

AT HALES-OWEN

171

REMEMBER THEE! REMEMBER!** 171

To TIME

171

TRANSLATION OF À ROMAIC LOVE

SONG

172

• THOU ART NOT FALSE, BUT THOU

ART FICKLE'

172

ON BEING ASKED WHAT WAS THE

• ORIGIN OF LOVE'

173

ON THE QUOTATION, ‘AND MY TRUE

FAITH CAN ALTER NEVER,' ETC. 173

TO THE Hon. MRS. GEORGE LAMB . 173

(LA REVANCHE)

174

REMEMBER HIM WHOM PASSION'S

POWER

174

IMPROMPTU, IN REPLY TO A FRIEND 174

SONNET, To GENEVRA

175

SONNET, TO THE SAME

175

FROM THE PORTUGUESE.

CHAMAS'

. 175

THE DEVIL'S DRIVE

175

(LOVE AND GOLD]

179

ODE TO NAPOLEON BUONAPARTE 180

STANZAS FOR MUSIC. 'I SPEAK NOT,'

ETC.

182

ADDRESS INTENDED TO BE RECITED

AT THE CALEDONIAN MEETING . 182

CONDOLATORY ADDRESS TO SARAH

COUNTESS OF JERSEY

183

ELEGIAC STANZAS ON THE DEATH OF

SIR PETER PARKER, BART.

183

JULIAN (A FRAGMENT]

184

To BELSHAZZAR

185

STANZAS FOR MUSIC. THERE'S NOT

A JOY,' ETC..

185

STANZAS. I HEARD THY FATE WITH-

OUT A TEAR'.

186

NAPOLEON's FAREWELL

186

FROM THE FRENCH.

186

ODE FROM THE FRENCH

187

STANZAS FOR MUSIC. • THERE BE

NONE OF BEAUTY'S DAUGHTERS 188

ON THE STAR OF THE LEGION OF

HONOUR'

DARKNESS

189

CHURCHILL'S GRAVE

190

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WHEN COLDNESS WRAPS THIS SUF-

FERING CLAY

220

Vision OF BELSHAZZAR

220

SUN OF THE SLEEPLESS

220

• WERE MY BOSOMAS FALSE AS THOU

DEEM'ST IT TO BE

221

HEROD'S LAMENT FOR MARIAMNE 221

ON THE DAY OF THE DESTRUCTION

OF JERUSALEM BY TITUS .

221

BY THE RIVERS OF BABYLON WE SAT

DOWN AND WEPT

222

THE DESTRUCTION OF SENNACHERIB 222

'A SPIRIT PASS'D BEFORE ME.' FROM

Јов

222

' IN THE VALLEY OF WATERS'

222

STANZAS FOR Music. “THEY SAY THAT

HOPE IS HAPPINESS

223

EPHEMERAL VERSES.

EPIGRAM ON AN OLD LADY WHO HAD

SOME CURIOUS NOTIONS RESPECT-

ING THE SOUL

[To Dives (WILLIAM BECKFORD). A

FRAGMENT]

223

EPITAPH ON John Adams, OF SOUTH-

224

FAREWELL PETITION TO J. C. H.; Esq: 224

"Oh how I WISH THAT AN EMBARGO' 225

YOUTH, NATURE, AND RELENTING

Jove'

225

'GOOD PLAYS ARE SCARCE

SCARCE;

225

• WHAT NEWS, WHAT NEWS? QUEEN

ORRACA

225

AN ODE TO THE FRAMERS OF THE

FRAME BILL

225

[R. C. DALLAS)

226

OH YOU, WHO IN ALL NAMES CAN

TICKLE THE TOWN'.

226

•WHEN THURLOW THIS DAMN'D NON-

SENSE SENT'

226

To LORD THURLOW

227

ANSWER TO

'S PROFESSIONS OF

AFFECTION

227

FRAGMENT

OF AN EPISTLE TO THOMAS

MOORE

227

WINDSOR POETICS

228

ON A ROYAL VISIT TO THE VAULTS 228

228

HERE'S TO HER WHO LONG' 228

'ONCE FAIRLY SET OUT ON HIS PARTY

OF PLEASURE

228

" IN THIS BELOVED MARBLE VIEW 229

"AND DOST THOU ASK THE REASON

OF MY SADNESS?'

229

• AS THE LIBERTY LADS O’ER THE

SEA

229

'SO WE'LL GO NO MORE A ROVING 229

'I READ THE CHRISTABEL

230

"To HOOK THE READER, YOU, JOHN

MURRAY'

230

GOD MADDENS HIM WHOM 'T IS HIS

WILL TO LOSE

230

'MY BOAT IS ON THE SHORE'

230

'NO INFANT SOTHEBY, WHOSE DAUNT-

LESS HEAD

231

* DEAR DOCTOR, I HAVE READ YOUR

PLAY'

231

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NOTES

1001

INDEX OF FIRST LINES.

. 1047

INDEX OF TITLES .

1051

.

.

NOTE. — The frontispiece portrait is after the drawing by G. H. Harlow.

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH

The main events of our poet's life are so well known that they may be rehearsed here with the utmost brevity. George Gordon was born in London, January 22, 1788. His mother's family, the Gordons, whose name he took owing to the will of a maternal ancestor, was Scottish but of French extraction. His father, Captain Byron, belonged to an ancient noble family which came to England with William the Conqueror. The poet's pride of ancestry was always one of the strongest traits of his character, mingled as it was, as in his bero Marino Faliero, with sincere republican feelings. The boy was born with a club foot, and this slight deformity had much to do with the waywardness of his disposition. Captain Byron soon dissipated most of his wife's fortune and then left her in liberty. In 1790 she removed to Aberdeen with her child, and the poet's early recollections were thus colored by his life in the Scottish Highlands. His first schooling was at Aberdeen, and later he was sent to Harrow. Meanwhile, the death of the old Lord Byron at Newstead Abbey gave him the title, at the age of ten, in default of nearer heirs. This fifth Lord Byron, whom the poet succeeded, left him, besides the title, a disagreeable family feud. He had, under suspicious circumstances, killed his neighbor and kinsman, Mr.Chaworth, in a duel. The poet afterwards was to fall in love with Chaworth's grandniece, the Mary whose name occurs so often throughout the poems. The brother of the fifth baron was the poet's grandfather, the celebrated Admiral John Byron, a bold but unfortunate seaman whose narrative of a shipwreck formed the groundwork of the great description in the second canto of Don Juan.

From Harrow Byron went to Trinity College, Cambridge, where he led a reckless and defiant life. Like many a better man and worse poet, he left without taking a degree. His drinking cup, made of a human skull, and his savage pets were notorious. His days were now passed chiefly at Newstead and in London. On coming of age he presented himself at the House of Lords, and even thought of taking up a political career. The report of his speeches later on and his cleverness as a pamphleteer suggest that, had he persisted, he might have made his mark in this field. But the spirit of adventure seized him. June 11, 1809, he left London with his friend Hobhouse and for two years traveled, passing through Portugal and Spain, where he was much impressed by the results of the Peninsular War, and wandering extensively in Greece and the Levant. He returned to England in July of 1811, with his head full of romantic notions. The first two cantos of Childe Harold and the Oriental Tales were the product of his travels, and immediately raised him into astonishing popularity. His life in London was now a union of social dissipation and feverish work. January 2, 1815, came his unfortunate marriage with Miss Milbanke, who, after the lapse of a year, separated from him, taking with her their infant daughter, Augusta Ada. Into the causes and mysteries of the divorce we may not enter. Byron was wild and his wife was a prude; it would seem that nothing more should need be said.

The public violently, and to a certain extent rightly, sided with Lady Byron, and the poet found it necessary to quit England. He sailed April 25, 1816, never to see his native land again. His greatest comfort seems to have been the loyal affection of his half-sister, Lady Augusta Leigh. Byron journeyed to Switzerland by way of the Rhine, and there,

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