Diary and Correspondence of Samuel Pepys from His MS. Cypher in the Pepsyian Library: With a Life and Notes by Richard Lord Braybrooke, Volumen 2

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Dodd, Mead, 1885
 

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Página 32 - Turkes; but I know not yet what they are for. The streets all gravelled, and the houses hung with carpets before them, made brave show, and the ladies out of the windows. So glorious was the show with gold and silver, that we were not able to look at it, our eyes at last being so much overcome.
Página 40 - Now, after all this, I can say, that, besides the pleasure of the sight of these glorious things, I may now shut my eyes against any other objects, nor for the future trouble myself to see things of state and showe, as being sure never to see the like again in this world.
Página 341 - To the King's Theatre, where we saw Midsummer Night's Dream, which I had never seen before, nor shall ever again, for it is the most insipid, ridiculous play that ever I saw in my life.
Página 53 - At table I had very good discourse with Mr. Ashmole, wherein he did assure me that frogs and many insects do often fall from the sky, ready formed. Dr. Bates's singularity in not rising up nor drinking the King's nor other healths at the table was very much observed. From thence we all took coach, and to our office, and there sat till it was late ; and so I home and to bed by day-light. This day was kept a holy-day through the...
Página 38 - Ports, which they endeavoured to force from them again, but could not do it till my Lord Duke of Albemarle caused it to be put into Sir R. Pye's hand till to-morrow to be decided.
Página 113 - W — e."2 a simple play, and ill acted, only it was my fortune to sit by a most pretty and most ingenious lady, which pleased me much.
Página 127 - Argier hath of late troubled me, because my Lord hath not done what he went for, though he did as much as any man in the world could have done. The want of money puts all things, and above all things the Navy, out of order...
Página 38 - I proffered the civility of lying with my wife at Mrs. Hunt's to-night) to Axe-yard, in which at the further end there were three great bonfires, and a great many great gallants, men and women ; and they laid hold of us, and would have us drink the King's health upon our knees, kneeling upon a faggot, which we all did, they drinking to us one after another. Which we thought a strange frolique ; but these gallants continued thus a great while, and I wondered to see how the ladies did tipple.
Página 33 - kinds, so much as the very fiddlers, in red vests. At last comes in the Dean and Prebends of Westminster, with the Bishops (many of them in cloth of gold copes), and after them the Nobility, all in their Parliament robes, which was a most magnificent sight.
Página 253 - The Queen is brought a few days since to Hampton Court ; and all people say of her to be a very fine and handsome lady, and very discreet ; and that the King is pleased enough with her : which, I fear, will put Madam Castlemaine's nose out of joynt.

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