The Christian Virtues in Medical Practice

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Georgetown University Press, 1 abr. 1996 - 176 páginas

Christian health care professionals in our secular and pluralistic society often face uncertainty about the place religious faith holds in today's medical practice. Through an examination of a virtue-based ethics, this book proposes a theological view of medical ethics that helps the Christian physician reconcile faith, reason, and professional duty.

Edmund D. Pellegrino and David C. Thomasma trace the history of virtue in moral thought, and they examine current debate about a virtue ethic's place in contemporary bioethics. Their proposal balances theological ethics, based on the virtues of faith, hope, and charity, with contemporary medical ethics, based on the principles of beneficence, justice, and autonomy. The result is a theory of clinical ethics that centers on the virtue of charity and is manifest in practical moral decisions.

Using Christian bioethical principles, the authors address today's divisive issues in medicine. For health care providers and all those involved in the fields of ethics and religion, this volume shows how faith and reason can combine to create the best possible healing relationship between health care professional and patient.

 

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Índice

VirtueBased Ethics Natural and Theological
6
THE RETURN TO VIRTUE ETHICS
14
THE THEOLOGICAL VIRTUES
17
PRINCIPLES AND THE VIRTUES NATURAL AND THEOLOGICAL
23
CONCLUSION
25
Christian Virtue Ethics
29
THE INTERNAL MORALITY OF MEDICINE
31
THE PHILOSOPHICAL STATUS OF A CHARITYBASED ETHIC
32
Charity in Action Compassion and Caring
84
SICKNESS IN TODAYS WORLD
85
CHRISTIAN COMPASSION
86
COMPASSION IN ACTION
87
CHRISTIAN COMPASSION AND MEDICAL ETHICS
88
COMPASSION AND THE HEALING COMMUNITY
90
THE RELATION OF CARING AND CURING
91
CARING AND COMPASSION?
93

CONCLUSION
38
NOTES
39
The Virtue of Faith
42
THE CHRISTIAN PHYSICIANHISTORICAL ORIGINS
45
CHALLENGES TO THE HIPPOCRATICCHRISTIAN SYNTHESIS
48
FAITHS INFLUENCE ON PRACTICE AND ETHICS
51
NOTES
54
Hope and Healing
56
BECOMING ILL OR DISABLED
58
HOPE ILLNESS DISEASE
59
ENGENDERING HOPE
60
RELIGION AND HOPE
64
WHY ME?
68
NOTES
69
Charity The Ordering Principle of Christian Ethics
72
WHAT DIFFERENCE DOES CHARITY MAKE?
73
CHARITY AND THE PHYSICIANPATIENT RELATIONSHIP
80
CONCLUSION
81
NOTES
82
CONCLUSION
96
Prudential Judgment and Religious Commitment
99
WHY INCLUDE RELIGIOUS COMMITMENTS IN ETHICAL DECISION MAKING?
101
HOW DOES RELIGIOUS COMMITMENT SHAPE MORAL CHOICE?
104
THE RELATIONSHIP OF FAITH AND REASON IN MEDICAL DECISIONS
111
PERORATION
115
The Christian Virtues and Autonomy Beneficence and Justice
117
AUTONOMY AND CHARITY
118
CHARITABLE JUSTICE
127
CONCLUSION
134
NOTES
135
The Christian Personalist Physician
139
EMBODIMENT OF VIRTUES AND PRINCIPLES
140
CHRISTIAN PERSONALISM AND THE CHRISTIAN PHYSICIAN
143
OBLIGATIONS TO RESPECT PERSONS IN THE DOCTORPATIENT RELATIONSHIP
149
CONCLUSION
153
NOTES
154
Name Index
157
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Página 7 - We may remark, then, that every virtue or excellence both brings into good condition the thing of which it is the excellence and makes the work of that thing be done well; eg the excellence of the eye makes both the eye and its work good; for it is by the excellence of the eye that we see well. Similarly the excellence of the horse makes a horse both...
Página 7 - Therefore, if this is true in every case, the virtue of man also will be the state of character which makes a man good and which makes him do his own work well.
Página 6 - The theological virtues dispose Christians to live in a relationship with the Holy Trinity. They have God for their origin, their motive, and their object - God known by faith, God hoped in and loved for his own sake.

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