Chambers' Home Book, Or Pocket Miscellany: Containing a Choice Selection of Interesting and Instructive Reading for the Old and the Young. Vol. I, II, IV, V.

Portada
William Chambers
Gould and Lincoln, 1853
 

Comentarios de usuarios - Escribir una reseña

No hemos encontrado ninguna reseña en los sitios habituales.

Páginas seleccionadas

Otras ediciones - Ver todo

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 170 - Who God doth late and early pray More of his grace than gifts to lend; And entertains the harmless day With a religious book or friend — This man is freed from servile bands Of hope to rise or fear to fall: Lord of himself, though not of lands, And, having nothing, yet hath all.
Página 170 - How happy is he born and taught That serveth not another's will ; Whose armour is his honest thought, And simple truth his utmost skill! Whose passions not his masters are, Whose soul is still prepared for death ; Untied unto the world by care Of public fame, or private breath ; Who envies none that chance doth raise...
Página 170 - Or vice ; who never understood How deepest wounds are given by praise ; Nor rules of state, but rules of good : Who hath his life from rumours freed; Whose conscience is his strong retreat ; Whose state can neither flatterers feed, Nor ruin make...
Página 153 - This called on me for revenge. I have sought it: I have killed many: I have fully glutted my vengeance. For my country, I rejoice at the beams of peace. But do not harbor a thought that mine is the joy of fear. Logan never felt fear. He will not turn on his heel to save his life. Who is there to mourn for Logan? — Not one.
Página 151 - ... attack from the whites. Cresap and his party concealed themselves on the bank of the river, and the moment the canoe reached the shore, singled out their objects, and at one fire killed every person in it.
Página 16 - It be freed From woes, to all since earliest time decreed ; But mayst thou be with resignation blessed, To bear each evil, howsoe'er distressed. " May Hope her anchor lend amid the storm, And o'er the tempest rear her angel form; May sweet Benevolence, whose words are peace, To the rude whirlwind softly whisper 'Cease!' " And may Religion, Heaven's own darling child, Teach thee at human cares and griefs to smile ; Teach thee to look beyond this world of woe, To Heaven's high fount, whence mercies...
Página 39 - O they rade on, and farther on, And they waded through rivers aboon the knee, And they saw neither sun nor moon, But they heard the roaring of the sea. It was mirk mirk night, and there was nae stern light,' And they waded through red blude to the knee ; For a' the blude that's shed on earth Rins through the springs o
Página 153 - I may challenge the whole orations of Demosthenes and Cicero, and of any more eminent orator, if Europe has furnished more eminent, to produce a single passage, superior to the speech of Logan, a Mingo chief, to Lord Dunmore, when governor of this state.
Página 151 - In the spring of 1774, a robbery and murder occurred in some of the white settlements on the Ohio, which were charged to the Indians, though perhaps not justly, for it is well known that a large number of civilized adventurers were traversing the frontiers at this time, who sometimes disguised themselves as Indians, and who thought little more of killing one of that people than of shooting a buffalo. A party of these men, land-jobbers and others, undertook to punish the outrage in this case, according...
Página 18 - Amir Khan" has long been before the public, but we think it has suffered from a general and very natural distrust of precocious genius. The versification is graceful, the story beautifully developed, and the orientalism well sustained. We think it would not have done discredit to our best popular poets in the meridian of their fame : as the production of a girl of fifteen, it seems prodigious.

Información bibliográfica