Benjamin Franklin's Humor

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University Press of Kentucky, 1 dic. 2005 - 186 páginas

" Explores the historical rise of the literary fairy tale as genre in the late seventeenth century. In his examinations of key classical fairy tales, Zipes traces their unique metamorphoses in history with stunning discoveries that reveal their ideological relationship to domination and oppression. Tales such as Beauty and the Beast, Snow White and the Seven Dwarves, and Rumplestiltskin have become part of our everyday culture and shapers of our identities. In this lively work, Jack Zipes explores the historical rise of the literary fairy tale as genre in the late seventeenth century and examines the ideological relationship of classic fairy tales to domination and oppression in Western society. The fairy tale received its most "mythic" articulation in America. Consequently, Zipes sees Walt Disney's Snow White as an expression of American male individualism, film and literary interpretations of L. Frank Baum's The Wizard of Oz as critiques of American myths, and Robert Bly's Iron John as a misunderstanding of folklore and traditional fairy tales. This book will change forever the way we look at the fairy tales of our youth.

 

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Índice

Silence Dogood 17221723
7
Philadelphias Poor Richard 17291735
23
Philadelphias Poor Richard 17331748
43
Philadelphias Poor Richard 17481757
61
Making Friends Overseas 17571774
81
Losing London 17731776
99
Seducing Paris 17761782
115
Comic Release 17831785
133
Revisiting Past and Future 17861790
149
Notes
165
Sources
171
Index
177
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Sobre el autor (2005)

Paul M. Zall is professor emeritus of American studies at California State University at Los Angeles.

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