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A letter was received by the Secretary, apologizing for his non-attendance, from WILLIAM H. DILLINGHAM, Esq. appointed as a Delegate by the Chester County Society, Pennsylvania.

The Secretary, the Rev. R. R. GURLEY, then read the Report of the Board of Managers, detailing the progress of the Society within the last year, in improving and extending the settlements of Liberia, in the acquisition of new Territory by purchase and negotiation, from the native Chiefs; the rapid advance that had been made in the obliteration of prejudices formerly entertained against the Society by citizens of various portions of the country; an important increase of funds, raised from the munificent contributions of philanthropic individuals; and the increased and increasing desire among those, for whose benefit the Society was organized, to embrace an opportunity of joining the Colony.

Mr. C. C. HARPER of Baltimore, then rose, and offered the following resolution:

Resolved, That the Report be printed, and that the thanks of the Society be presented to the Board of Managers.

At no former meeting of the Society, Mr. Harper said, had we so much reason, as the Report justly affirms, to be gratified with the result of our labours, or could look forward at so cheering a prospect for the future. Indeed, Mr. Chairman, through the zealous and able exertions of the Board of Managers, the practicability of founding, on the coast of Africa, Colonies that shall maintain a hold and flourish, has ceased to be a matter of discus. sion. It has been demonstrated. At least it has been demonstrated to our satisfaction: and we are justified in persevering. If any one still deny the possibility or likelihood of such an establishment, we must no longer reason with him on abstract principles or from ancient examples, but answer theories with facts. In our career of success we have, indeed, outstript the most sanguine anticipations; we have disappointed the most confident predictions of evil.

A prosperous, and, compared with the surrounding nations, a powerful community, created by the hands of this Society, does exist on the coast of Africa. I have seen several of its citizens: I have heard its voice across the Atlantic.

However difficult and doubtful the accomplishment of such an enterprise may have seemed to many, it was, to my apprehension, the most easy in our whole design. It was merely a physical exertion. But, Sir, what must have at first repressed your hopes and risen like an insuperable obstacle in your path, was the uncertainty whether you could prevail upon any coloured persons to be the objects of so novel and dangerous an experiment, and

From the State Society of Ohio. The Hon. ELISHA WHITTLESEY-President of the Auxiliary Society, Canfield, Trumble County, Ohio.

The Hon. PHILEMON BEECHER,
The Hon. John DAVENPORT,
The Hon. WILLIAM M LEAN,
The Hon. John Woods.

From Washington County Society, Pennsylvanią.
The Hon. Joseph LAWRENCE.
From the Society of Petersburg, Virginia,
The Hon. Mr. ARCHER,
Thomas Atkinson, Esq.

From the Richmond Society, Virginia.
Chief Justice MARSHALL,
The Hon. John TYLER,
ROBERT G. Scott, Esq.

From the Society in Alexandria, D. C.
Rev. J. CORNELIUS,
GEORGE Johnson, Esq.

From the Society of Piqua County, Ohio.
The Hon. WM. M-LEAN.

From the Society at Cleaveland, Ohio.
The Hon. MORDECAI BARTLEY.
From the Wilmington Union Colonization Society, Delaware.
The Hon. KENSEY Johns, Jun.

From the Society of Lexington, Ky.
The Hon. JAMES CLARK.

From the Wheeling Society, Virginia.
The Hon. Isaac LEFFLER.

From the Talbot County Society, Maryland.
Hon. John Leeds KERR.

From the State Society of Maryland.
C. C. HARPER, Esq.
J. H. B. LATROBE, Esq.

From the Society at Lynchburg, Virginia.
J. B. HARRISON, Esq.

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A letter was received by the Secretary, apologizing for hig non-attendance, from WILLIAM H. DILLINGHAM, Esq. appointed as a Delegate by the Chester County Society, Pennsylvania.

The Secretary, the Rev. R. R. GURLEY, then read the Report of the Board of Managers, detailing the progress of the Society within the last year, in improving and extending the settlements of Liberia, in the acquisition of new Territory by purchase and negotiation, from the native Chiefs; the rapid advance that had been made in the obliteration of prejudices formerly entertained against the Society by citizens of various portions of the country; an important increase of funds, raised from the munificent contributions of philanthropic individuals; and the increased and increasing desire among those, for whose benefit the Society was organized, to embrace an opportunity of joining the Colony.

Mr. C. C. HARPER of Baltimore, then rose, and offered the following resolution:

Resolved, That the Report be printed, and that the thanks of the Society be presented to the Board of Managers.

At no former meeting of the Society, Mr. Harper said, had we so much reason, as the Report justly affirms, to be gratified with the result of our labours, or could look forward at so cheering a prospect for the future. Indeed, Mr. Chairman, through the zealous and able exertions of the Board of Managers, the practicability of founding, on the coast of Africa, Colonies that shall maintain a hold and flourish, has ceased to be a matter of discus. sion. It has been demonstrated. At least it has been demonstrated to our satisfaction: and we are justified in persevering: If any one still deny the possibility or likelihood of such an establishment, we must no longer reason with him on abstract principles from ancient les, but ans theories with facts. In our career of success we have, indeed, outstript the most sanguine anticipations; we have disappointed the most confident predictions of evil. A prosperous, and, compared with the surrounding na. tions, a powerful community, created by the hands of this Society, does exist on the coast of Africa. I have seen several of its citizens: I have heard its voice across the Atlantic.

However difficult and doubtful the accomplishment of such an enterprise may have seemed to many, it was, to my apprehension, the most easy in our whole design. It was merely a physical exertion. But, Sir, what must have at first repressed your hopes and risen like an insuperable obstacle in your path, was the uncertainty whether you could prevail upon any coloured persons to be the objects of so novel and dangerous an experiment, and

ver his

whether the charity of the public would continue to supply you with the means of making it. Confiding in the dictates of your conscience and in the holiness of your cause, you boldly advanced to the attempt.

Your pious reliance, like that of the Apos of old, was rewarded: you walked upon the indurated waters, and mountains stooped before you into plains. Your designs have been understood and appreciated by those for whose benefit they are chiefly intended; and many hundreds more than you can or would now send, daily apply for emigration. Far from shuddering at the thought of leaving the comfortable fireside among us, for a distant and unknown shore yet covered by the wilderness, they have preferred real liberty there, to a mockery of freedom here, and have turned their eyes to Africa, as the only resting place and refuge of the coloured man, in the de. Tuge of oppression that surrounds him.

At the same time, but much more rapidly, the number of our friends among the whites has immensely increased in every part of our country.The feeble gush of yet doubting charity, which enabled you to take the first steps in the experiment, has become a constant stream with a thousand growing tributaries. From the South, where we feel the evil; and from the North, where they only behold it; from the sea-board, where we are approaching the condition of older nations; and from the remote interior, where civilized man is yet warring with the primeval forest; every hour brings applause for your exertions and prayers for your success. Individuals, companies, states, swell the chorus of approving voices.

So it must ever be, Sir, with this undertaking. It is in harmony with the best and noblest feelings of the human heart; and the mind itself expands and glows in the contemplation of its great and various merits. You must alter our nature, before you can make us indifferent to African Colonization. Before you can arrest its course, you must stifle the press and lay an interdict on the liberty of speech. Already the cool and calculating statesman finds himself labouring by the side of the enthusiastic devotee; and the secluded man of science attains by argument the same conclusion, to which feeling impels the multitude. It is thus we bave united in our ranks men of all capacities, all places, all denominations. We have gone to the meetings of the learned and astute; and they have favoured us. We have gone to the primary assemblies of the people; and they have favoured us. The people, Sir, are the source alike of revenue and law.To them have we gone. We have called upon their philanthropy, their patriotism, their religion: they have offered us their hearts and purses.Our agents bave penetrated every district of the country, to explain our views, to embody those who approve, to convince or persuade those that are opposed, and to convert the irregular and precarious donations upon which we have hitherto subsisted, into a concerted system of regular and steady contribution. The most superficial observer may perceive, that African Colonization has become an object of more earnest attention and

more lively interest with the people. Let us continue to apply for aid to that sure and inexhaustable source. In a few short years, the public mind will be thoroughly imbued with our project. Then, nothing that we may elsewhere reasonably ask can be refused.

The objects of the Society and the means by which they are to be effected, I shall not now enumerate nor defend. They are, or ought to be, sufficiently understood, after the many eloquent explanations that have resounded within these walls and reverberated throughout our vast country. Objection after objection has bowed and yielded to the extension of opinions in our favour. For the feasibility of our designs, I may refer the incredulous to Liberia, and to the sentiments that are manifestly beginning to actuate so many thousands of our fellow-citizens; for their reasonableness and honesty, I appeal to the illustrious names that adorn our list of officers and members.

Such, Sir, was the origin, such are the conditions and prospects of your benevolent scheme. Such may they ever be! Thus far we have succeed. ed. We are the guardians of a nation in the bud, -a miniature of this Republic,-a coloured America on the shores of Africa. To whose exertions do we owe the past, and to whose exertions must we look for the further prosperous advancement of our cause? To the Board of Managers. To the Board of Managers, then, I move, Sir, that the thanks of the Society be presented; and that their Report be printed.

Which was agreed to unanimously.
Mr. LATROBE then addressed the Society.
MR. CHAIRMAN:-

After the able and eloquent Report of the Board of Managers, which we have just heard read, and after the remarks of my fel. low representative from the Society in Maryland; it would be only trespassing upon your time to dwell upon either the present condition, or the past history of our Society's existence. The past has been fraught with difficulty, and the present is replete with glorious promise: Both make us acquainted with our power, but admonish us, that we have, as yet, taken only the first steps in the eat work, which we propose to accomplish. The establishment of one colony has been happily effected. The doubtful experiment has equalled the most sanguine expectations, but the one channel thus opened, will never be alone sufficient to receive that population, thirty thousand of which must be annually removed before any impression can be made upon the increase. * Other tracts of territory must be obtained,

The annual increase of the coloured population of the United States, slave and free, is estimated by Mr. Clay at 52,000, (see his address at the 10th annual meeting of the American Colonization Society) from which, substracting those who never attain the age of puberty, and those over fifty, as not adding to the increase, 30,000 may be said to be the number necessary to be removed annually, to diminish the coloured population. The annual increase of the free blacks is only 6,000, and the removal of

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