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Port EUS, Bishop, extracts from, vol. 2, 45, 46, 278, 279, 320, 327, 328. - Power, when great, attended with the most serious moral dangers to him who is in possession of it, vol. 2, 14, 15. Prayers, often made subservient to political purposes, vol. 2, 275. Prayers, public, effect produced on literature by their being formerly always in Latin, vol. 2, 294. Prelates, English, just sentiments on the subject of toleration advanced by some, by Hoadly, vol. 1, 210; Taylor, vol. 1, 215, 22 l; Clayton, vol. 1, 216 ; false sentiments on the same subject advanced by others, by Newton, vol. 1, 2 29, 230; IIurd, vol. 1, 232; Kidder, vol. 2, 239, 240. * Priestley, Dr. quotations from, vol. 1, 145, 255, 25, 281–283, 285, 290, 297, 306, 307. vol. 2, 205, 2.7, 228, 260, 26.1, 272, 273, 313, 326. See also preface. PRIESTs, their privileges in Egypt, vol. 1, 5; the lofty claims of many among them, vol. 1, 59, 60 ; their character in the fourth century, vol. 1, 184; their eagerness at that time to enrich themselves, vol. 1, 177, 178, 182, 183; were at that period believed to have the power of forgiving sins, vol. 1, 176, 177; this high prerogative asserted by a learned divine of the English church, vol. 1, 176; learning at one period confined to them, vol. 2, 297, 325; their servility sometimes conspicuous, vol. 1, 199, 214, 215, 236; not unfrequently accommodated their faith to that of the reigning prince, vol. 1, 158, 159; have often supported civil tyranny, vol. 1, 60, 61, 117, 227, 233, 234; vol. 2, 324; diminution of their power regretted by bp, Newton, vol. 1, 229. See Ecclesiastics. Priscillianists, their treatment in the fourth century, vol. 1, 188. Property, uncertainty of a powerful motive to indolence and extravagance, vol. 2, 60. PROPHEcIES, scriptural, numerous, minute, and circumstantial, vol. 1, 71, 196, 300, 30 l ; their accomplishment often gradual, vol. 2, 23, 28, 144, 355. PROPHE cy, its existence perfectly compatible with our ideas of the Deity, vol. 1, 280, 281; its existence to be accounted for only on the supposition of its being divine, vol. 1, 196, 280, 301, 302; some of the reasons why it was communicated to a single nation, vol. 1, 299–301 ; its frequent obscurity how to be accounted for, vol. 1, 30–32, 296–299, 304. vol. 2, 266—268;

means proper for removing this obscurity, vol. 1, 33–36, 37, 293, 294; its tendency to promote virtue, vol. 1, 287; intended, in the opinion of Sir I. Newton to have a powerful effect in the accomplishment of great revolutions, vol. 2, 157, 158; arguments in favor of the opinion, that it sometimes has a double sense, vol. 2, 77–86, 88, 89, 92–94; often interpreted in too liberal a manner, vol. 2, 155,257, 264, 265, 357–360, 363; the same thing often represented in plain language, which was before described by means of symbols, vol. 1, 258, 259. vol. 2, 165, 166, 181, 18, 261, the past tense often employed instead of the future, vol 1, 266. vol. 2, 87; much knowlege often requisite in order to descern the full force of the evidence in favor of revelation resulting from it, vol. 1, 140, 141. PRoPhots, HEBREw, arguments in favor of their divine autholity, vol 1, 280–306; the great uniformity of their religious opinions, vol. 1, 286, 287; their courageous and disinterested conduct, vol 1, 288, 289; inculcated elevated notions of the Deity, vol. 1, 286, 288. IIpoozzo, the meaning it sometimes has, vol. 1, 111, 112. Prussia, king of, extract from, vol. 2, 152, 153. Public spirit, Christianity favorable to it, vol. 2, 278—284, 235– 345. Purgatory, popish doctrine of, had its origin in the fourth century, vol. 1, 178. REFoRMATION, PR or ESTANT, causes which contributed to it, and effects which flowed from it, vol. 1, 28, 29. vol. 2, 331–333. Reformers, Protestant, almost all ecclesiastics, vol. 2, 295, 303. Relics, the efficacy of them believed in the fourth century, vol. 1, 178, 181. Religious opinions, necessarily various, vol. 1, 2:5, 218. ' Republics, Jurieu from the study of prophecy appears to have expected their universal establishment, vol. 2, 11, 348; same opinion appears to have been maintained by other commentators, vol. 1, 42. Resentment, when properly exerted, vol. 2, 280. RESISTARc E to oppression, when a duty, vol. 2, 282, 283; perfectly consistent with the precepts of Christianity, vol. 2, 280; celebrated moderns who have distinguished themselves by asserting the lawfulness of it, vol. 2, 283. Revelation, why its proof not irresistible, vol. 1,26. vol. 2,266,267.

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Ribera, the Jesuit, mention of, vol. 1, 76.

Rights Of Man, circumstances or institutions which favor theip recognition, vol. 9\ 274, 275, 278, 284—:86.

Robertson, Dr.extracts from, vol. 2, 112, 288, 292, 321, 322, 325, 326, 328, 329—333.

Rohillas, a branch of y/hat nation, vol. 2, 222.

Roman Empire, most prosperous from the year 96, to the year 180,402; in that period, however, the latent causes of decav and corruption operated, vol. 2, 307, 3Q9; governed with unusual beneficence by Septimius Severus and Alexander Severus, vol.2, 53; miserably torn and afflicted in the reign of Gallienus, vol. 2, 310; in the latter part of the fourth, and during the whole of the fifth and sixth centuries, reduced to a very calamitous state by the scarcity of food and the irruptions of the Barbarians, vol. 2, 57—70; causes of its decline and dissolution, vol. 2, 307—310; when its fall may be dated, vol. 2, 58.

Roman legions, their degeneracy in the reign of Constantius, vol. 2, 57, 58.

Roman Catholic clergy, causes which prompted many among them to cultivate literature, vol. 2, 332.

Rome, referred to in the Apocalypse, vol. 1, 196, 199—203; repeatedly besieged, and a prey to famine in the fifth and sixth centuries, vol. 2, 66, 67; its pre-eminence under the pontiffs the source of some benefits, vol. 2, 293, £94, 296, 303, 304, 321, 322.

Romish Church, not chargeable with the introduction of so many corruptions as is commonly supposed, vol. 1, 183, 184, 190, 191, 206. vol. 2, 69, 70; has long been in a state of decline, vol. 1, 245.

Rousseau, one of his objections against Christianity stated, vol. 2, 338, 339 ; shown to be unsolid, vol.2, 278—282, 335—341.

Russia, conquered by the Tartars, vol. 2, 116, 117; beneficial change in that country produced by the introduction of Christianity, vol. 2, 293, 323; supposition Relative to its future destiny, vol. 2, 244, 250, 251; valuable manuscripts it possesses, vol. 2, 302, 303.

Russia, empress of, her conduct alluded to, vol. 1, 248.
Sebatai Sevi, a Jew of Aleppo, account of, vol. 2, 233—.236.
Saints, worship of, an established practice in the fourth century,
vol. 1, 178, 179.

Samaritan Pentateuch, mention of, vol. 1, 281.

Samaritan's cruelty treated by Justinian, vol. 2, 22.
Scholastic philosophy, circumstances respecting, vol. 2, 313, 314.
Schools, where established in the dark ages, vol. 2, 294, 297.
Seals, Seven, general remarks on, vol. 2, 46—50; some account

of the first seal, vol. 2, 50; of the second, vol. 2, 49, 50; of the

third, vol. 2, 51—69; of the fourth, vol. 2, 69; of the fifth, vol.

2, 70; of the sixth, vol. 2, 71—76; of the seventh, vol. 2, 368,

369.

Septuagint, some account of, vol. 1, 283,284.

Servants, in the opinion of bp. Newton, ought to be reduced to a

state of greater subjection, vol. 1, 2 29. Scrvetus, the intemperate language employed against him, vol. 1,

226, 227.

Severus, one of the principal authors of the decline of the Roman

empire, vol. 2, 308. Sins, superstitious methods of obtaining the pardon of them, vol.

1, 176, 177.

Slavery, domestic, Christianity a powerful enemy to, vol. 2, 328—, 331.

Slave-Trade, carried on in Asia, vol.2, 132, 133.

Spain, its sufferings in the fifth century, vol. 2, 61; scarcity of

books there in the tenth century, vol. 2, 291, 292. Spalatro, ruins of, observations on, vol. 2, 311. Speech, freedom of, ought in the opinion of bishop Newton to be

shackled, vol. 1, 229. Stair, earl of, anecdote of, vol. 1, 15.

Subscription-to articles, evils of, and objections to, vol. I, 195, 209,

210,212—214,215—221,232. Superstition, causes of its ascendency in the fourth century, vol. 1,

176; the Hebrew prophets an obstacle to its progress in Judea,

-vol. 1, 286, 290; occasionally productive of beneficial effects,

vol. 2, 233, 294, 322, 329. Symbolic Language, advantages of it, vol. 1, 32, 35, 36; not so

vague and indeterminate as many suppose, vol. 1, 32—35; vol.

2,44; on the means proper for - explaining it, vol. 1, 33, 37;

-whence it came to be the language of prophecy, vol. 1, 30—36;

propriety and consistency attended to in the use of it, vol 1,

115, 1 16, 263; on the nature of it, vol. 1, 36, 37, 115, 116! Syria, great decrease of its population, vol. 2, 241, 242. Synagogues, Jewish, circumstances respecting, vol. 1, 281.

Tamerlane, his conquests and immense depredations, vol. 2, 117, l 18, 255. TARTARs, from whom supposed to be derived, vol. 2, 246—248; their armies extremely numerous, vol. 2, 115–1 18; have made more extensive conquests than any other people, vol. 2, 115– 118, 250; their diet, vol. 2, 251; their habitations, vol. 2, 251, 252; their weapons, vol. 2, 249, 250; their exercises, vol. 2, 253,254; the cruel and destructive spirit of their depredations, vol. 2, 118, 254, 255. Tartary, its great extent, vol. 2, 116; testimonies of authors respecting many of the Jews being seated there, vol. 2, 223, 224. Taylor, Jeremy, extracts from, vol. 1, 215, 216, 221. Temples, heathen, by whom usually destroyed, vol. 1, 190. Theodore, of Tarsus, his meritorious conduct in England, vol. 2, 296,297. Theodosian code, disgraced by many persecuting laws, vol. 1, 186, 190. Theodosius, a violent persecutor, vol. 1, 187, 189. Theory of the earth, account of some of Dr. Burnet's ideas on that subject, vol. 2, 343–347. Thrace, laid waste by the Visigoths, vol. 2, 58, 59. Tott, baron de; extract from, vol. 2, 128. Transubstantiation, foundation of this doctrine laid in the fourth century, vol. 1, 178. Trinitarians, persecuted by Valens, vol. 1, 188. 7'rtice of God, circumstances respecting the regulation so called, vol. 2, 321, 322. TRUMPETs, sev EN, general remarks on them, vol. 1, 157, 14*. vol. 2, 49, 99; some account of the fourth trumpet, vol. 2, 36; of the fifth, vol. 1, 138–140; of the sixth, vol. 1, 139, 140; of the seventh, vol. 1, 142—149, 151–153, 252, 253. vol. 2, 33, 48. Turkish government, spirit of, vol. 2, 135, 241. TURKs, their conquests and downfal, supposed to be foretold by St.

John, vol. 1, 139, 140, vol. 2, 67, 70, 99–101; and by Daniel, vol. 2, 103–108; some account of their conquests, vol. 1, 140, vol. 2, 105–107.

Vandals, their devastations, vol. 2, 61.

Vestals their privileges preserved after the establishment of Christianity, in the Roman empire, vol. 2, 74.

VIALs, seveN, general remarks on, vol. 1, 1, 9, 10, 151—154, 157. vol. 2, 31–99; the first vial noticed, vol. 1, 155; the second,

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