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JUR1Eu, M. account of, vol. 1, 84, 85, 92, 103; extracts from, vol. 1, 84, 88–95, 121, 25.4—255, 256. vol. 2, 11, 12, 228, 348. Justinian, his arbitrary and persecuting conduct, vol. 2, 20–22 ; his reign very calamitous, vol. 2, 63, 64. Kidder, bishop, his illiberal advice respecting the Jews, vol. 2, 239 –241. The kingdom of God, or kingdom of Heaven, meaning of the expressions, vol. 2, 162, 163, 174, 175. Kings, censured by Dr. Owen, vol. 1, 55, 56, 268; vol. 2, 149; their power of destroying most effectual, vol. 2, 63, 64; what the king of Prussia says respecting them, vol. 2, 153. KNow LEGE, what circumstances obstruct the cultivation of it, vol. 2, 270; the great effects it has produced, and is likely to produce, in the political world, vol. 1, 254, 255. Kpaya, the meaning it sometimes has, vol. 1, 147. Lactantius, his mode of interpreting prophecy, vol. 2, 357, 358. Lancaster, Dr. his symbolical Dictionary valuable, vol. 1, 35, 36. Language, Hebrew, particulars relative to, vol. 1, 293. Languages, modern European, in what manner they have been improved, vol. 2, 304, 305. LARDNER, Dr. extracts from, vol. 1, 21–23, 184, 188. 194; vol. 2, 3, 165, 166. - Latter times, period so called in prophecy, thought to be probably approaching by Sir I. Newton, and Dr. Hartley, vol. 1, 305. vol. 2, 157, 158. LEARNING, not always rewarded, vol. 1, 67, 68; decline of it in Europe to what causes to be attributed, vol. 2, 30.5–315 ; Christianity favorable to it, vol. 2, 287–299, 301–315, 320, 321. See Literature. LEEchMAN, Dr. his behaviour on his death-bed, vol. 2, 328; extracts from, vol. 2, 334–341. Liberty, politicAL, may be expected to be progressive in its course, vol. 2. 13, 14; its progress assisted by Christianity, vol. 1, 215, 216, vol. 2, 274–341. Libraries, particulars respecting, vol. 2, 289,290–292, 296–298, 301–303.

Lightfoot, Dr. extracts from, vol. 2, 350–352,

LITERATURE, danger of its complete destruction, in the dark ages, vol. 2, 287–296 ; state of it in Germany, vol. 2, 101, 102. Longevity of those who live in the period of the millennium foretold, vol. 2, 360–363, 370–372. - Lord's supper, compulsory mode of administering it, vol. 1, 191, 192. Lorenzo de Medicis, his exertions in favor of literature, vol. 2, 302. Louis, XIV. conduct of, vol. 1, 1 17, 134. Lonis XVI. found himself obliged to invite the people of France to accomplish a change, vol. 1, 12, 13, 90. Low MAN, Mr. extracts from, vol. 1, 49, 70, 78, 158, 159, 197, 199, 262, 273. vol. 2, 53, 350, 352, 353. Ludovicus, supposed by some commentators to be denoted by the number 666, vol. 1, 131–136. Macedonius, a violent persecutor, vol. 1, 191—193. * Mahometanism, causes which paved the way for it, vol. 1, 194. vol. 2, 55, 69, 70; its sects very numerous, vol. 2, 313, 314. , Maimonides, Moses, particulars respecting, vol. 2, 38. MAMALUKEs, their origin, vol. 2, 132 ; their number kept up not by marriage, but by the purchase of Asiatic slaves, vol, 2, 133; limitation of their power by the Turks, vol. 2, 132; great increase of it during the present century, vol. 2, 132; their oppressions, vol. 2, 132, 133, 135–137; their robust health, vol. 2, 132, 133; their valor and personal expertness, vol. 2, 138. Man of Sin, meaning of the words, vol. 1, 161; prophecy relating to, vol. 1, 160–169, 193, 194. Manicheans, their treatment in the fourth century, vol. 1, 187. MANKIND, when most happy, vol. 2, 49; visibly diminished in the reign of Justinian, vol. 2, 63, 64. Manuscripts, particulars relative to valuable collections of, vol. 2, 302–304; in what manner and by whom they were formerly written, vol. 2, 295, 298. Martin of Tours, his character, vol. 1, 188. Martyrs, their prior resurrection, an opinion not founded in scripture, vol. 2, 352–354; festivals in honor of them numerous in the fourth century, vol. 1, 178, 181, 182. Masorites, their minute diligence, vol. 1, 283,

Mathematicians, in the second and several subsequent centuries unjustly classed with astrologers, vol. 2, 311. Mecca, caravan of, circumstances respecting, vol. 2, 105, 112, l 13. MEDE, Joseph, circumstances relative to, vol. 1, 39–43, 57; vol. 2, 34, 194; extracts from, vol. 1, 8, 20, 44, 169, 170, 261. vol. 2, 9, 10, 12, 16, 35–37, 40,170, 171, 176, 177, 184, 185, 193, 206, £08, 246, 247, 259, 262, 263; his opinions stated, vol. 1, 14, 15, 35, 36, 49, 50, 57, 59, 76, 82, 106, 107, 127, 137, 138– 140, 142, 148, 149, 197, 265, 266, 278. Memory, must be exercised earlier than fancy" or reason, vol. 2, 304, 305. Military skill circumstances favorable to the acquisition of, vol. 2, 253. MilleNNIUM, characteristics of this period, vol. 2, 257, 258, 348, 349–$51, J52, 353, 354, 355–357, 359, 361, 362, 363, 368, 370–372. Mishna, some account of, vol. 1, 283. Moguls, their mighty conquests, vol. 2, 116–119. Mon ARchi Es, ANT1c HRISTIAN, of EUROPE, by what emblems expressed, vol. 1, 48, 49, 201–206. vol. 2, 3–5, 9–1 l; prophecies relative to their destruction, vol. 1, 142, 143, 271–278. vol. 2, 3–13, 153–157, 355. Mon ARchi Es, antichristian, those of the world in general destined to be destroyed, vol. 2, 7–9, 11—13, 35–47, 71–77, 87–89, 91–96, 171–173, 176. Mon ARchs, their censurable interference in matters of conscience, vol. 1, 54, 60, 162, 175, 183, 184, 186–193, 274. vol. 2, 149, 150. vol. 1, 54; the ridiculous titles they have assumed, vol. 1, 56, 181, 182; those in the North of Europe far more formidable than those in the South, vol. 2, 101, 102. Mon ARchs, EUROPEAN, passages in the prophecies supposed to relate to the fate of some of them, vol. 1, 126, 145–149, 256 , –263, 265–269, 271–278. vol. 2, 3–13, 40---44. Mon Astic INSTITUTIONs, progress of them, vol. 1, 180, 181; vol 2, 297; beneficial effects resulting from them, vol. 2, 290--295, 297---299, 300---304. Monks, their tumultuous proceedings in the fourth century, vol. 1, 190, 191; in the middle ages the instructors of youth, vol. 2,

294, 297; many of them at that period diligently employed in the copying of manuscripts, vol. 2, 298. Months, among many ancient nations consisted only of 30 days, vol. 1, 114, 115. MoRE, Dr. HENRY, extracts from, vol. 1, 41, 42, 106–108, 116, 210. vol. 2, 9, 24. - Mosh EIM, extracts from, vol. 1, 165, 172–184. vol. 2, 296. Mountains, favorable to freedom, vol. 1, 119. Nantes, edict of its revocation an important aera, vol. 1, 1 16, 117, 134. Navigation, reasons for supposing that hereafter it will not be so frequently destructive of human life, as it now is, vol. 2, 280, 281. Newcombe, ARchbishop, extracts from, vol. 1, 284–288, 292 –294. vol. 2, 1 1, 247, 254, 262. NEwton, Bishop, once a friend to liberty, vol. 1, 228, 230–332; afterwards a violent asserter of sentiments hostile to freedom, vol. 1, 228—232; extracts from, vol. 1, 42, 50, 51, 84, 138, 228— 30, 343, 295. vol. 1, 7, 10, 16, 105–108, 130, 197, 199, 205, 204, 211, 215; his interpretations or opinions combated or denied, vol. 1, 166, 167, 169, 193,245. vol. 2, 30, 48–50, 53, 72–74, 127, 128, 138, 148, 149, 189–194, 247–251, 348– 351, 365–360. See also preface. Newton, SIR. Isaac, Mr. Gibbon's testimony respecting him as a critic and theologian, vol. 2, 3; extracts from him, vol. 1, 20, 44, 45, 76, 144. vol. 2, 3, 12, 15, 26, 38, 96, 157; 158, 354; his opinions stated, vol. 1, 1 19, 138, 140, 155, 178. vol. 2, 75, 133, 366. Nice, Council of, circumstances relative to, vol. 1, 185, 186, 194. Nicholas, V. some particulars respecting this illustrious man, vol. 1, 304, 305. Normans, effects produced by their conversion to Christianity, vol. 2, 296, 297, 323. Numbers, which occur in Daniel, opinions of commentators relative to, vol. 2, 15, 25–31 ; opinions of commentators respecting those found in the Apocalypse, vol. 1, 113–1 18. Vol. 2, 15, 26. Nuns, opinions prevalent in the fourth century relative to them, vol. 1, 18 l. Octai, a million and a half of cavalry subject to his command, vol. 2, 116, 117. 3 F.

Oil, very cytensively useful, vol. 2, 54. Oracles, heathen, circumstances which contributed to bestow on them a certain degree of credit, vol. 1, 34, 35, 285, 286. 30 h; 302. Owen, Dr. extracts from, vol. 1, 55, 256, 268, 269. vol. 2, 38, 149, 150. t Pag as worship, public exercise of, in a great degree tolerated by the seven first Christian emperors, vol. 2, 73---75; afterwards prohibited by persecuting statutes, vol. 1, 189, 190. Palatinate, laid waste by order of Louis XIV. vol. 1, 134. Palavicini, cardinal, quotation from, vol. 1, 6}. Paley, Dr. extracts from, vol. 1, 166. vol. 2, 267, 282, 283, 316– 320, 326, 327, 3.34. - o PAp A1, pow ER, its destruction foretold, vol. 1, 243–246. Parchment, formerly scarce, vol. 2, 225. Parr, Dr. the characters of Warburton and Hurd contrasted by him, vol. 1, 237. Pelusium, its situation, vol. 1, 126, 127; a wall of great length built near it, vol. 2, 1 : 1. Penance, the mode of performing it, vol. 1, 176, 177. PERs Ec corro N, different instances of, vol. 1, 55, 85, 162, 185–193; maxims of, by whom inculcated, vol. 1, 226, 227. vol. 2, 239– 241; causes of it, vol. 2, 318–320. PERSIA, ravaged by Attila, vol. 2, 116; conquered by the successors of Zingis, vol. 2, 116; by Temerlane, vol. 2, 117, 118; by the Afghans, vol. 2, 218; the Jews who inhabited it numerous at different periods, vol. 2, 216, 224, 225, 230–233, 237, 238. PERSIANs, conquer Egypt, vol. 2, 123, 124; often make inroads into Arabia, vol. 2, 112. Pilgrimages, frequent in the fourth century, vol. 1, 178; have not been completely destitute of utility, vol. 2, 322, $23. Piratical depredations in Europe, cause which principally checked them, vol. 2, 323. Plague, how extirpated in Egypt, vol. 2, 129, 130. Political corruption, its extensive diffusion, vol. 2,281. Poor, the laborious, in what respects Christianity has benefited them, vol. 2, 327, 328. Popes, some of them great patrons of learning, vol. 1, 255. vol. 2,

303, 304; sometimes aided the cause of peace and humanity, vol. 2, 321, 322. -

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