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Erasmus, encomium of vol., 2, 303. .

Eternity, speculations respecting, vol. 2, 188. Evanson, Mr. extracts from, vol 1, 51–53, 62, 65, 161–164, 168, 204, 210, 243. vol. 2, 188. European states, advantageous circumstances in which they are placed, vol. 2, 322–326. Eusebius, of Caesarea, sometimes censurable vol. 1, 176, 188, 189; carried away with a fondness for monarchism, vol. 1, 181. Ever and ever, the expression how limited; vol. 1, 270. vol. 2, 268, 269. Faith, admits of degrees, vol. 1, 306. Falsehood regarded in the fourth century as a lawful method of promoting the interests of the church, vol. 1, 181. Famine, generally followed by pestilence, vol. 2, 61, 64, 66, 67. Fasting, with what view performed in the fourth century and in what manner vol. 1, 180. Father, sense in which the word is sometimes used, vol. 1, 241. Fathers, or primitive writers of the church, what is the fair mode of estimating their merits or defects, vol. 2, 291. Faustus, enveighs against the superstitions of the orthodox, vol. 1, 179. FLEMING, Mr. Robert, some account of him, vol. 1, 4, 5, extracts from him, vol. 1, 1–6. vol. 2, 81, 82 his sentiments on the fourth vial examined, vol. 1, 3–13, 149, 156, 157. FourTH century, account of its corruptions, vol. 1, 156, 157, 171—195. FRANce, the probability of a revolution in that country grounded upon a particular passage of the Apocalypse, by Mr. Laughlan Taylor, vol. 1, 78, Mr. Willson, vol. 1, 79; Mr. Whiston, vol. 1, 79; Dr. Thomas Goodwin, vol. 1, 80 ; M. Jurieu, vol. 1, 88–93; an anonymous French commentator, vol. 1, 95, 96, 98, 99; Dr. Cressener, vol. 1, 100; an anonymous English commentator, vol. 1. 100–102; Dr. Gill, vol. 1, 132; and by Vitringa, vol. 1, 102, 104; not antecedently improbable that this event is pointed out by St. John, vol. 1.71, 72; arguments which may be alleged in support of this interpretation vol. 1, 73, 76, 77, 96–98, 101–131 the extent of France greater in the sixth century than at present, vol. 1, 135; scarcity of books there in the dark ages, vol. 2, 291;"has produced a great number of persons, who have encountered persecution in defence of

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their religion than any other country, vol. 1, 84, 88; Europe greatly indebted to this country for the light, which first arose

- in it on the subject of religion and the papal usurpations, vol. !, 86, 87; itself much indebted to England for its speculative notions in favor of freedom, vol. 2, 299, 300; rendered in a considerable degree inquisitive by the Protestant Reformation vol. 2, 333; its example likely hereafter to produce a great effect on the nations of Europe, vol. 2, 13, 354, 355,

Franks, their depredations and conquests, vol. I, 135. vol.2, 56.

Freedom, the cause of, destined to meet an obstinate resistance from the two imperial courts, vol. 2, 101,102 ; assisted by Christianity, vol. 1, 215. vol. 2,274—.341.

French Revolution, some of the causes of it, vol. 1, 10—13, 299—301 ; what class of persons have been principal sufferers in it, vol. 1, 119; some of those who powerfully contributed to it, ecclesiastics, vol. 2, 332; some of the reasons to account for the crimes by which it has been stained, see note 5, in preface.

French monarchy, rose rapidly into power, vol. 1, 135; humiliation of it expected by Mr. Fleming, vol. 1,3; how far its expen-diture surpassed its income, vol. 1,13,

French emigrants, conduct of many of them. vol. 1, 17—19,

French emigrant princes, their lofty language, vol. 1, 7, 8.

Gentiles, meaning of the term, vol. 2, 74, 145,

George of Cappadocia, his vices, vol. 1, 182.

Germany, great number of books published there, vol. 2, 101, 102.

Gibbon, Mr. extracts from, vol. 1, 55, 135, 176, 191, 192, 21. vol. 2, 49, 53, 54, 56, 66, 67, 74, 110—114, 116, 120, 121— 123, 185, 250—253, 289, 300, 304—306, 307—310, 312. 320, 321, 323

Gladiatorial shows, particulars respecting, vol. 2,327, 328.
God the Great Bay of, the expression explained, vol. 1, 26 lj
Gog and Magog, reasons in support of the conjecture, that they

signify the Tartars, vol. 2, 146—256.
Goodwin, Dr. Thomas, some account of, vol. 1, 80.
Goths, their devastations, vol, 2, 56, 58—.60, 66, 67.
Greece, ancient, cities of, the circumstances of advantage in which

they were placed, vol. 2, 322, 323. Greek, knowlege of it nearly extinct among the Latins in the 13th

century, yol. 2, 289,

Gregory the Great, his statement respecting Antichrist, vol. 1, 301, 203. Hadrianople, the battle of, circumstances relative to, vol. 2, 59. HARTLEy, Dr. extracts from, vol. 1, 207, 232, 285, 291, 303305, 179, 215, 240, 123. HEBREw Schiptures, arguments in favor of their authenticity, vol. 1, 280, 285, 291–334; means which may he employed to elucidate them, vol. 1, 292–294. Henry VIII. conduct of, vol. 1, 125, 162. Heretics, infamous laws against them, vol. 1, 186, 189; their treatment in the fourth century, vol. 1, 186–190; in what light viewed by some of the reformers, vol. 1, 226. Hermanric, his extensive sway, vol. 2, 57. Herodotus, his statements respecting Egypt, vol. 2, 127, 128, 131. HIERARchies, ANT1cHRISTIAN, how emblamatized in prophecy, vol. 1, 196, 200, 205; the obligation there is to quit them, vol. 1, 204, 205; their destruction foretold, vol. 1, 203–209, 274– 279; vol. 2, 142–152. HIERARchies, PRotestANT, shewn to be antichristian, vol. 1, 168, 169, 207,217,232; resemble in various respects the church of Rome, vol. 1, 168, 193, 194, 198–201, 208, 210, 21 1, 221 ---224; have in some respects been more censurable than even the church of Rome, vol. 1, 167, 209. Hieroglyphics, some circumstances relating to, vol. 1, 33, 34, 67. vol. 2, 38. Hindostan, conquered by Tamerlane, vol. 2, 1 18; circumstances favoring the conjecture that the ten tribes were situated on the borders of this country, vol. 2, 216–223, 225–232, 233. History, its great importance in enabling the inquirer to form an accurate estimate of the value of that evidence in favor of Revelation, which is derived from prophecy, vol. 1, 71, 72, 140– 142, 294, 295, 304. History of the middle ages, the moderns indebted to the monks for their knowlege of it, vol. 2, 293. Hoadly, bishop, quotation from, vol. 1, 209, 210. Hobbes, extract from, vol. 2, 305. Holy fleofile, meaning of the term, vol. 2, 27, 28. Holy water, introduced in the fourth century, vol. 1, 178. Horace, passage in one of his odes having a double sense, vol. 2, 85, Horses, multitude of a great evil, vol. 2, 155. Hume, David, the observations he has alleged against the people exercising their rights censured by bp. Hurd, vol. 1, 237–239; his account of a joint production of Warburton and Hurd, vol. 1, 240. Hungary, laid waste by the Tartars, vol. 2, 117. Huns, their devastations, vol 2, 61, 63. Hunting, singular mode of conducting it in Tartary, vol. 2, 253. HURD, Bishop, his sentiments as a man and conduct as a bishop at variance, vol. 1, 221, 242–252 ; extracts from, vol. 1, 27, 31, 35, 39, 139, 140, 221, 222, 232—240, 256, 295, 296, 303, 304, vol. 2, 22, 24, 76, 82–84, 181, 182, 202, 203, 205, 206, 256, 263, 275,281. Hypocricy, particularly prevalent in the fourth century, vol. 1, 189; circumstances productive of it, vol. 1, 194, 195. Jerom, one of the most learned of the fathers, vol. 1, 174, 175; abusive to his antagonists, a fanatical applauder of celibacy, vol. 1, 179, 181. Jerusalem, vices of the inhabitants in the fourth century, vol. 1, 182; by whom successively possessed, vol. 2, 206, 208, 209. Jews, their government originally democratic, vol. 1, 277; remarks on their character in ancient times, vol. 1, 290; the precautions they took to preserve their sacred writings uncorrupted, vol. 1, 283, 284; the great mistake into, which they fell respecting the Messiah, vol. 2, 163, 167; by whom attacked and oppressed prior to the Christian aera, vol. 2, 210, 211; their great sufferings under the Romans, vol. 2, 196, 198; oppressed by the Christians in the fourth century, vol. 1, 196, 197; subsequent persecutions and calamities, vol. 2, 204, 220, 230, 231; have been deluded by numerous impostors, vol. 2, 230, 237; bishop Kidder's illiberal sentiments with respect to them, vol. 2, 239, 24 l ; enumeration of the countries in which they are principally settled, vol. 2, 242, 243; many of them in Spain and Portugal conceal their race and sentiments, vol. 2, 225, 226; what is known respecting the past fate of the Ten Tribes, vol. 2, 215, 216, 219; conjecture respecting the present situation of those tribes, vol. 2, 216–229; prophecies relative to their dispersion and wretched situation, vol. 2, 195, 196, 198, 201, 202; prophecies relative to their future restoration, vol. 2, 205–215; circumstances favoring their return to Judea, vol. 2, 241, 242;

conjectures relative to the causes which may perhaps contribute

to it, vol.2, 243—245. Imitation, necessary to the artist, vol. 2, 304, 305. Impostors, Jewish, account of, \ol. 2, 230—237. Inconsistency, bishops Huid ami Newt m furnish an example of,

vol. 1,320, 221, 2 7, 24?. Infidelity, observations on, vol. 2, 199, SOI; among what description of persons it principally prevailed in France, vol. 1,16. Inquiry, freedom of, connexion between political and religious,

vol. 2, 331—333; sincerity, ingeniously vindicated in bishop

Hurd's Dialogues, vol. 1, 338—241. Interpretations of prophecy, some means hinted at for forming a

probable judgment respecting their truth or falshood, vol. 1, 42,

73.

Joachim of Calabria, his statement respecting Antichrist, vol. 1,

202, 203. , John, St. particulars respecting him, vol. 1, 22—25 Jones, Sir William, extract from, vol. 2, 216, 217 Jortin, Dr. extracts from, vol. 1, 24, 35, 175, 179, 181, 185—

187, 188—190, 209, 216, 287,288. vol. 2, 73, 80, 85, 86, 258

268, 290—293, 315; Joseph, the patriarch, his political conduct in the latter part of his

life highly censurable, vol. 1, 4, 5. Josephus, statements borrowed from him, vol. 1,286. vol. 2, 1, 181,

196—198.

Irenieus, curious quotation from, vol. 2, 358.

Isaiah, his style characterised, vol. 2, 86; the period in which he lived, vol. 2, 87; eminent for the clearness of his prophecies relative to the kingdom and dispensation of the Messiah, vol. 2, 81, 87, 94, 96, 360, 361.

Isles of the sea, that expression explained, vol. 2, 75, 76.

Israelites, warned against having a king, vol. 1, 5.

Italy, its miserable state during a large part of the fourth and fifth centuries, vol. 2, 61,62, 64—67; the centre of arts and the promoter of literature among the nations of modern Europe, vol. 2, 294, 296, 302—304.

Judea, its ancient population, vol. 2, 241.

Julian, his account of the persecutions carried on in the reign of his predecessor, vol. 1, 192; his declaration to the citizens of Antioch in favor of frugality, vol. 2, 53, 54.

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