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Olive-trees, vol. 1. 109.
Palm, branches of, vol. 2. 367.
Rain, vol. 1. 128. -
Rising from the dead, vol. 1. 106–108, 118. vol. 2. 354.
Scarlet, vol. 1. 49.
Sea, vol. 1. 48, 58, 59. vol. 2. 171, 172, 356.
Selling, the act of, vol. 1. 65.

Serpent, 66.
Stars, vol. 2. 36, 37, 39, 43, 75, 76.
Sun, vol. 1. 2, 13, 14. vol. 2. 35–39, 75, 76.
Sword, vol. 2. 49.

Teeth, 1O.
Temple of God, vol. 1. 162. vol. 2. 368.
Thirst, 3.68.

Throne, vol. 1. 158. vol. 2. 350.
Thunder, vol. 2. 141.

Trees, vol. 1. 109.

Trumpet, 142.

Vintage, 266, 267.

Waters, 48, 128, 201. vol. 2. 99, 100. 172.
Wheels, vol. 2. 1 1.
White, the color, vol. 2.264, 367.
Zion, vol. 2. 93.

GENERAL INDEX.

ASot/FO'OC, meaning of the word, vol, I. p. 77. vol.2. 349.

Achmet, his work on Oneirocritics, vol. 1, 34. vol. 2, 39.

jEtheopia, influence of Christianity there, vol. 2, 326.

Afghans, from whom said to be descended, vol. 2, 216, 217: have
undergone various revolutions, vol. 2, 217, 218,222.

Africa, the immense supply of corn and oil which it formerly ex«
ported to Italy, vol. 2, 54, 61; its devastation by the Vandals,
vol. 2, 61; its recovery by Justinian and subsequent rebellions*
vol. 2, 63; number of bishoprics it once contained, vol. 2, 70.

Agriculture, causes of its decline in the fourth and fifth centuries,
vol 2, 60, 65.

Aim, meaning of the word, vol.2, 161, 162, 183.

Albigenses. See Waldenses.

Alcasar, statement of this learned Jesuit respecting the Apoca-
lypse, vol. 1, 44, 114, 196, 201. y

Alcuin, abbot, France greatly indebted to this Englishman, vol.
2, 299.

Alemanni, their devastations, vol. 2, 57.

Alexandria, in ancient times very populous, vol. 2. 133; its mer-
chants oppressed by George of Cappadocia, vol. 1, 182; pre-
sent state of its ports and canal, vol. 2, 137; profusion of
ruins in its neighborhood, vol.2, 136.

3c

Alexandria, school of, circumstances relative to, vol. 2, 312.

Ambrose of Milan, his conduct and opinions, vol. 1, 176, 181, 185.

America, Northern States of, have not gained so much by a Re-
volution, as many other countries would, vol. 2, 13.

American Revolution, effect it produced upon France, vol. 2, 300.

Analogy between Natural and Revealed Religion, remarks on,
vol. 1, 296, 297,304.

Angel, meaning of the term, vol. 1, 253.

Anglo-Saxons, their devastations and conquest of the southern
part of Britain, vol. 2, 56, 57, 62; effects produced by their
conversion to Christianity, vol. 2, 295, 296.

Antichrist, signification of the term, vol. 1, 9, 161; marks of, vol.
1, 212, 215; the destruction of all antichristian authority over
the conscience foretold, vol. 1, 168,203—207. vol. 2, 147—151.

Apocalypse, why so called in the opinion of Vitringa, vol. 1, 20;
when written, vol. 1,21; precautions taken for its preservation,
vol. 1, 38; attested by very early writers, vol. 1, 20—22, 196;
early commented upon, vol. 1, 21,25; whence its genuineness
Was denied by some as far back as the fourth and fifth centuries,
vol. 1, 23, 25; testimonies of learned moderns in favor of its
authenticity, vol. 1, 20—21, 24—26. vol. 2, 188; designs of it
in the opinion of Lowman and Vitringa, vol. 1,71; advantages
which have resulted from it, vol. 1, 27—30, 197; whence its
usefulness may be expected to be hereafter more conspicuous,
vol. 1, 29, 303. vol. 2, 157 j causes of its obscurity, vol. 1, 30,
31, 39, 40; on some of the methods for removing its obscurity,
Vol. 1, 33—36, 70; the diversity of opinions among its inter-
preters not a sufficient reason for its rejection, vol. 1, 26, 27, 36,
37, 299; is made up of two parts, vol. 1, 36; some account of
the first part, vol. 1, 36, 38 ; the checks provided in it against
the fancy of an expositor, vol. 1, 35, 39; copiousness and par-
ticularity of its predictions, vol. 1, 72, 196, 197; many of its
predictions relate to political events, vol. 1, 40, 43 ; contains
contemporaneous predictions, and sometimes represent the same
event by different symbols, vol. 1, 39, 262—264: many of
its symbols borrowed from Daniel, vol. 1, 50. vol. 2, 3, whence
the language of symbols were employed in it, vol. 1,* 31, 33,
36, 40.

Arabs, the peculiarities of their situation and character supposed
to be foretold in Genesis, vol. 2, 108—123; supposed to be re-
ferred to by Daniel, vol. 2, 103; their extensive depredations
foretold by St. John, vol. 1, 138–139; always engaged in do-
mestic and foreign hostilities, vol. 2, 110, 114, 121; their per-
sonal freedom, vol. 2, 110, l l 1, 119, 122; their national inde-
pendence, vol. 2, 305, 114, 115, 119, 122, 123; their country
often invaded, vol. 2, 114, 115; extent and rapidity of their
conquests, vol. 1, 138, 139; their primitive manners still re-
tained, vol. 2, 110, 111, 119–122; nature of the studies in
which they engaged, vol. 2, 305, 306; length of the period
wherein literature flourished among them, vol. 2, 305, 306.
Arians, cruel treatment of them in the fourth century, vol. 1, 187.
Aristotle, the great authority he obtained in the schools in the dark
ages, vol. 2, 314, 315.
Armies of antiquity, those of small countries often very numerous,
vol. 2, 242, 243. -
Arnulph of Orleans, his statement respecting Antichrist, vol. 1,
201, 203.
Arts fine, decline of them in the Roman empire, vol. 2, 307–311.
Astronomy, the magnificent views it suggests respecting the pro-
bable multitude of worlds the virtuous are successively to enter,
vol. 2, 188, 189.
Athos Mount, monasteries of, formerly possessed of great literary
treasures, vol. 2, 302.
Attila, his mighty conquests and devastations, vol. 2, 62, 115, 116.
Austria, house of, circumstances that threaten its downfal, vol.
2, 102. -
Babylon, prophecies relative to, vol. 1, 294, 295. vol. 2, 86–88.
BABYLoN, symbolic, prophecies relative to, vol. 1, 195, 206, 211.
vol. 2, 86, 88, 142, 143, 151.
BARBARIANs some of the great effects produced by those who over-
ran the Roman empire enumerated, vol. 1, 55, 56, 60, 65, 67,
287, 288, 306; the different causes which prompted their de-
structive inroads, vol. 2, 63.
Baptism, false notions of, have been very mischievous, vol. 1, 176.
BARBAULD, Mrs. extracts from, vol. 2, 275–277, 284–286, 293
295. s
Barcochebas, account of, vol. 2, 203.
Basnage, extracts from, vol. 2, 204, 216, 222, 226, 237.
Batou, this general traverses with his five hundred thousand horse,
a fourth part of the globe's circumference, vol. 2, 116-118.

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