Multicultural Japan: Palaeolithic to Postmodern

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Donald Denoon, Mark Hudson, Gavan McCormack
Cambridge University Press, 20 nov. 2001 - 302 páginas
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This text challenges the conventional view of Japanese society as monocultural and homogenous. Offering historical breadth and interdisciplinary orientation, the book ranges from prehistory to the present, arguing that cultural diversity has always existed in Japan. All editors from ANU.
 

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Índice

Introduction
1
The Japanese as an AsiaPacific Population
19
A LanguageContact Model for the Origins of Japanese
31
Beyond Ethnicity and Emergence in Japanese Archaeology
46
Archaeology and Japanese Identity
60
The Frontier in the Construction of Japanese Identity
81
The Place of Okinawa in Japanese Historical Identity
95
Ainu and Okinawan Identities in Contemporary Japan
117
Indonesia under the Greater East Asia CoProsperity Sphere
160
Japanese Army Internment Policies for Enemy Civilians During the AsiaPacific War
174
Modern Patriarchy and the Formation of the Japanese Nation State
213
Unique or Universal?
224
Emperor Rice and Commoners
235
Two Interpretations of Japanese Culture
245
Impediments in Japans Deep Structure
265
Diversity and Identity in the TwentyFirst Century
287

Some Reflections on Identity Formation in East Asia in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries
135
A Note on Mutual Images
153

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