Evolution of Wild Emmer and Wheat Improvement: Population Genetics, Genetic Resources, and Genome Organization of Wheat's Progenitor, Triticum Dicoccoides

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Springer Science & Business Media, 29 ene. 2002 - 364 páginas
This book is about the contribution to evolutionary theory and agricultural technology of one of humankind's most dramatic imitations of the evolu tionary process, namely crop domestication, as exemplified by the progenitor of wheat, Triticum dicoccoides. This species is a major model organism and it has been studied at the Institute of Evolution, University of Haifa, since 1979. The domestication by humans of wild plants to cultivated ones during the last ten millennia is one of the best demonstrations of evolution. It is a process that has been condensed in time and advanced by artificial rather than natural selection. Plant and animal domestication revolutionized human cultural evolution and is the major factor underlying human civilization. A post-Pleistocene global rise in temperature following the ice age, i.e., climatic-environmental factors, may have induced the expansion of econom ically important thermophilous plants and in turn promoted complex forag ing and plant cultivation. The shift from foraging to steady production led to an incipient agriculture varying in time in various part of the world. In the Levant, agriculture developed out of an intensive specialized exploitation of plants and animals. Natufian sedentism, followed by rapid population growth and resource stress, induced by the expanding desert, coupled with available grinding technology, may have triggered plant domestication.
 

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Página 344 - Roder, MS, Plaschke, J., Konig, SU, Borner, A., Sorrells, ME, Tanksley, SD, and Ganal, MW (1995) Abundance, variability and chromosomal location of microsatellites in wheat. Mol. Gen. Genet. 246: 327-333.
Página 328 - T., and Zamir, D. (2000). A recombination hotspot delimits a wild-species quantitative trait locus for tomato sugar content to 484 bp within an invertase gene. Proc. Natl. Acad Sci. USA 97, 4718-4723.
Página 324 - Causse MA, Fulton TM, Cho YG, Ahn SN, Chunwongse J, Wu K, Xiao J, Yu Z, Ronald PC, Harrington SE, Second G, McCouch SR, and Tanksley SD (1994) Saturated molecular map of the rice genome based on an interspecific backcross population.

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