The second part of the History of the Reformation of the Church of England. A collection of records and original papers, with other instruments referred to in the second part of the History...2v

Portada
University Press, 1829
 

Què opinen els usuaris - Escriviu una ressenya

No hem trobat cap ressenya als llocs habituals.

Continguts

Scotland said to be subject to Marquis of Northampton sues
115
Protector returns to England 71 tion
122
He complains to the protector 76 Corruptions in the office of
128
An act repealing severe laws ib It is variously censured
134
Ancient ways of electing bi He is ordered to preach
144
And makes some petitions ib The clergy desire to have repre A new Liturgy resolved upon 149 The changes made in it
150
But without success ib The manner of the presence
172
The grounds of that 98 All preaching forbid for a time
176
The affairs of Germany 176 Of these there were two sorts
178
Bucer writes against Gardiner tism
233
Arguments for it from scripture An answer sent to them
239
1549 A general pardon
247
He was sent to the Tower 201 He did not obey them 25 2
254
Tbe bill against him passed 204 But is deprived
261
Subsidies granted 209 The affairs of Germany
267
Paget sent to the emperor 271 tions 3
312
A treaty with the emperor 288 A German congregation
318
The reformation carried on 294 buses
324
Bulloigne was resolved to be given to the French 301 The reasons given for it ib Sermons on workingdays for
330
and French ib Bucers death and funeral
337
Ridley made bishop of London
343
Proceedings against Gardiner Corrections in the Common PrayerBook
349
Tb lady Mary has mass still The entail of the duke of
399
But she was intractable 359 A reformation of the ecclesias
406
The sweating sickness 363 Projects for relieving the poor clergy
417
He is brought to his trial 369
428
The seal is taken from the lord The affairs of Germany 43 2
434
Proceedings at Trent 386 1553
441
An act against usury 396 ters patents
447

Altres edicions - Mostra-ho tot

Frases i termes més freqüents

Passatges populars

Pàgina 784 - THE blood of our Lord Jesus Christ, which was shed for thee, preserve thy body and soul unto everlasting life! Drink this in remembrance that Christ's blood was shed for thee, and be thankful.
Pàgina 267 - Because there is none other that fighteth for us, but only thou, O God.
Pàgina 772 - ... by the authority of the canonical Scriptures, or by the first four General Councils, or any of them, or by any other General Council wherein the same was declared heresy by the express and plain words of the said canonical Scriptures...
Pàgina 784 - THE body of our Lord Jesus Christ, which was given for thee, preserve thy body and soul unto everlasting life ! Take and eat this in remembrance that Christ died for thee ; and feed on him in thy heart by faith with thanksgiving.
Pàgina 530 - For the poor you have always with you, but me you have not always.
Pàgina 298 - DO you trust that you are inwardly moved by the Holy Ghost to take upon you this Office and Ministration, to serve God for the promoting of his glory, and the edifying of his people ? Answer.
Pàgina 459 - Lord God, deliver me out of this miserable and wretched life, and take me among thy chosen ; howbeit not my will but thine be done ; Lord, I commit my spirit to thee. O Lord, thou knowest how happy it were for me to be with thee ; yet for thy chosen's sake send me life and health, that I may truly serve thee. O my Lord God, bless my people, and save thine inheritance.
Pàgina 6 - Brown, master of horse; Sir William Paget, secretary of state; Sir Edward North, chancellor of the court of augmentations; Sir Edward Montague, chief justice of the common pleas; Judge Bromley, Sir Anthony Denny, and Sir William Herbert, chief gentlemen of the privy chamber; Sir Edward Wotton, treasurer of Calais; Dr. Wotton, dean of Canterbury. To these executors, with whom was intrusted the whole regal authority were appointed...
Pàgina 61 - The form of bidding prayer was not begun by King Henry, as some have weakly imagined, but was used in the times of popery, as will appear by the form of bidding the beads in King Henry the Seventh's time. The way was, first for the preacher to name and open his text, and then to call on the people to go to their prayers, and to tell them what they were to pray for ; after which all the people said their beads in a general silence, and the minister kneeled down also and said his.
Pàgina 842 - ... they combined themselves by classes and subscriptions ; when they descended into that vile and base means of defacing the government of the church by ridiculous pasquils; when they began to make many subjects in doubt to take...

Informació bibliogràfica