The Complete Angler: Or, The Contemplative Man's Recreation, Being a Discourse of Rivers, Fish-ponds, Fish and Fishing

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Sir Nicholas Harris Nicolas
Chatto and Windus, 1875 - 320 páginas
 

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Página 103 - Thy gowns, thy shoes, thy beds of roses, Thy cap, thy kirtle, and thy posies, Soon break, soon wither, soon forgotten: In folly ripe, in reason rotten. Thy belt of straw and ivy buds, Thy coral clasps and amber studs, All these in me no means can move To come to thee, and be thy love.
Página 74 - ... Angler or the Contemplative Man's Recreation. Being a Discourse of Fish and Fishing, Not unworthy the perusal of most Anglers.
Página cxiv - But the Nightingale, another of my airy creatures, breathes such sweet loud music out of her little instrumental throat, that it might make mankind to think miracles are not ceased.
Página 37 - ... doubt not therefore, Sir, but that Angling is an art, and an art worth your learning. The question is rather, whether you be capable of learning it; for Angling is somewhat like poetry, men are to be born so: I mean, with inclinations to it, though both may be heightened by discourse and practice : but he that hopes to be a good angler, must not only bring an inquiring, searching, observing wit, but he must bring a large measure of hope and patience, and a love and propensity to the art itself;...
Página 100 - IF all the world and love were young, And truth in every shepherd's tongue, These pretty pleasures might me move To live with thee and be thy love.
Página 135 - Indeed, my good scholar, we may say of angling, as Dr Boteler * said of strawberries, " Doubtless God could have made a better berry, but doubtless God never did ; " and so, if I might be judge, God never did make a more calm, quiet, innocent recreation than angling.
Página 100 - With coral clasps and amber studs: And if these pleasures may thee move, Come live with me and be my love.
Página 23 - ... we contemn and pity. Men that are taken to be grave because nature hath made them of a sour complexion; money-getting men, men that spend all their time, first in getting, and next in anxious care to keep it; men that are condemned to be rich, and then always busy or discontented : for these poor rich men, we anglers pity them perfectly, and stand in no need to borrow their thoughts to think ourselves so happy.
Página 101 - Trust me, master, it is a choice song, and sweetly sung by honest Maudlin. I now see it was not without cause that our good queen Elizabeth did so often wish herself a milkmaid all the month of May, because they are not troubled with fears and cares, but sing sweetly all the day, and sleep securely all the night: and without doubt, honest, innocent, pretty Maudlin does so. I'll bestow Sir Thomas Overbury's milkmaid's wish upon her, "that she may die in the Spring; and, being dead, may have good store...
Página 53 - My next and last example shall be that under-valuer of money, the late Provost of Eton College, Sir Henry Wotton, a man with whom I have often fished and conversed, a man whose foreign employments in the service of this nation, and whose experience, learning, wit, and cheerfulness, made his company to be esteemed one of the delights of mankind...

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