Imágenes de página
PDF
ePub

dhes.

27. Ideas ofspace and solidity

distinct.

CHA P. XV.

28. Men differ little in clear Of duratiori and expansion con.

simple ideas.

sidered together,

. SECT.

CHA P. XIV.

1. Both capable of greater

Of duration and its simple modes,

and less.

SECT.

2. Expansion not bounded

by matter. .

1. Duration is fleeting ex.

.. 3. Nor duration by motion.

tension.

4. Why men more easily ad.

2-4. Its idea 'from reflection

mit infinite duration,

on the train of our ideas.

than infinite expansion.

5. The idea of duration ap-

5. Time to duration, is as

plicable to things whilst

place to expansion.

-- . we sleep...

6. Time and place are taken

6-8, The idea of succession

for so much of either að

nos from motion. .

are set out by the exis-

9-11. The train of ideas has a

tênce and motion of bo.

certain degree of quick.

ness.

12. This train, the measure

7. Sometimes for so much

of either as we design by

of other successions.
13–15. The mind cannot fix long

measure taken from the

bulk or motion of bo.

on one invariable idea,

dies.

16. Ideas, however made, in-

8. They belong to all be.

include no sense of mo.

ings.

• tion.

9. All the parts of extension,

17. Time is duration set out

are extension; and all the

by measures.

parts of duration are du.

18. A good measure of time

ration.

must divide its whole

10. Their parts inseparable.

duration into equal pe. ii. Duration is as a line, ex.
riods. .

pansion as a solid.,
1g. The revolucions of the sun

12. Duration has never two
and moon, the properest

parts together, expansion
measures of time.

all together.

But not by their motion,

but periodical appear.

ances.

. C H A P. XVI.

21. No two parts of duration

Of number,

can be certainly known to SECT.

be equal, .

1. Number, the simplest and

22. Time not the measure

most universal idea.

of motion,

. Its modes made by ad.

23. Minutes, hours; and

dition.

years, not necessary mea.

3. Each mode distinct.

sures of duration,

4. Therefore demonstrations

24–26. Our measure of time ap.

in numbers the most pre.
plicable to duration be.

cise,
fore time.

$, 6. Names necessary to num.

7 30. Eternity.

a 4

7. Why

20.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

to Belo

7. Why children number not

CHA P. XVIII.

earlier.

8. Number measures all

of other simple modes.

measurables.

SECT.

1, 2. Modes of motions.

C H A P. XVII.

3. Modes of sounds.

4. Modes of colours.

of infinity.

5. Modes of tastes and

SECT.

smells.

1. Infinity in its original 6. Some simple modes have

intentions attributed to

no names.

space, duration, and num. 7. Why some modes have,

ber.

and others have not

2. The idea of finite easily

names.

got.

3. How we come by the

'CH A P. XIX.

idea of infinity.

4. Our idea of space bound.

Of the modes of thinking,

less.

SECT.

5. And so of duration.

1, 2. Sensation, remembrance,

6. Why other ideas are not

contemplation, &c.

capable of infinity.

3. The various attention of

7. Difference between infi.

the mind in thinking,

nity of space and space 4. Hence it is probable that

infinite.

thinking is the action, R Volu

8. We have no idea of in.

not essence of the soul. roli

finite space.

9. Number affords us the

CH A P. XX.

clearest idea of infinity.

11. Our different conception or

Of modes of pleasure and pain.

of the infinity of num. SECT,

ber, duration, and ex. 1. Pleasure and pain simple

• pansion.

ideas.

12. Infinite divisibility,

2. Good and evil, what.

14. No positive idea of in.

Our passions moved by

finity.

good and evil.

15-19. What is positive, what

4. Love.

negative, in our idea of 5. Hatred,

infinite,

6. Desire,

16, 17. We have no positive idea 7. Joy,

of infinite duration.

8. Sorrow,

18. No positive idea of infi. 9. Hope,

nite space.

1o. Fear.

30. Some think they have a 11. Despair,

positive idea of eternity, 12. Anger,

and not of infinite space. 13. Envy,

21. Supposed positive idea of 14. What passions all mens This

infinity, cause of mis.

have.

takes.

15, 16. Pleasure and pain, what.

22. All these ideas from

17. Shame.

sensation and reflection,

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

18. These instances do show 36. Because the removal of

how our ideas of the pas.

uneasiness is the first step :

- sions are got from sensa.

to happiness.

tion and reflection.

37. Because uneasiness alone

is present.

CHA P. XXI.

38. Because all, who allow the

Of power.

joys of heaven possible,

SECT.

pursue them not. But a
1. This idea how got.

great uneasiness is never

2. Power active and pas.

1. neglected.

39. Desire accompanies all

sive,

3. Power includes relation.

uneasiness.

4. The clearest idea of ac.

40. The most pressing uneasi.


tive power had from

ness naturally deterinines

spirit.

the will. a

5. Will and understanding,

41. All desire happiness.

two powers,

42. Happiness, what.

6. Faculties.

43. What good is desired,

what not.

7. Whence the ideas of li.
berry and necessity.

44. Why the greatest good is

8. Liberty, what.

not always desired.

9. Supposes understanding .

45. Why, not being desired,

it moves not the will.
and will

10. Belongs not to volition.

46. Due consideration raises

11. Voluntary opposed to in.

desire.

47. The power to suspend the

voluntary, not to neccs.

prosecution of any desire,

12. Liberty, what.

makes way for conside-

13. Necessity, what.

ration.

14–20. Liberty belongs. not to

48. To be determined by our

the will,

own judgment, is no re.

21. But to the agent or

straint to liberty.

man..

49. The freest agents are so

23–24. In respect of willing, a

determined.

man is not free.

50. A constant determination

25, 26, 27. The will determined

to a pursuit of happi.

by something without it.

ness, no abridginent of

28. Volition, what.

liberty.

51. The necessity of pursuing

29. What determines the will.

30. Will and desire must not

true happiness, the foun.

be confounded.

dation of all liberty.

31. Uneasiness determines the

52. The reason of it.

: will.

53. Government of our pas.

33. Desire is uneasiness.

sions, the right improve.

33. The uneasiness of desire

ment of liberty.

determines the will..

55. How men come to pursue

34. This the spring of action,

different courses.

35. The greatest positive good

56. How men come to choose

determines not the will,

ill.

57. First, from bodily pains.

but uneasiness,

Secondly, from wrongde.

sires

sary.

[blocks in formation]
[ocr errors]

sires arising from wrong

power, have been most T

judgment.

modified.

59. Our judgment of pre I'T. Several words seeming to

sent good or evil always

. signify action, signify

right.

but the effect.

60. From a wrong judgment

12, Mixed modes, made also

of what makes a neces.

of other ideas.

•: • sáry part of their happi.

i ness.

61, 62. A more particular account

CHAP. XXIII.

of wrong judgments.

63. In comparing present and of the complex ideas of substances,

future.

65. Causes of this.

SECT.

66. In considering

1. Ideas of substances, how

conse.

quences of actions.

made. .

67. Causes of this. .

. 2. Our idea of substance in co

Wrong judgment of what

genera).

3, 6. Of the sorts of substances, ro

is necessary to our hap-

piness.

4. No clear idea of substance

). We can change the agree-

.. in general.

ableness or disagreeable.

5. As clear an idea of spirit i on

ness in things.

as body.

70. Preference of vice to vir.

7. Powers a great part of
tue, a manifest wrong

our complex idea of sub,

:: stances.

judgment.

8. And why.'.

71--73. Recapitulation.

9. Three sorts of ideas make

our complex ones of sub.

CHAP. XXII.

stances.

jo. Powers make a great part CH

Of mixed modes.

of our complex ideas of twee

SECT.

. substances.

1. Mixed modes, what.

11. The now secondary qua.

lities of bodies would dis- One

.. 2. Made by the mind.

3. Sometimes gòt by the ex.

... appear, if we could disco-

plication of their names.

ver the primary ones of

. . 4. The hante ties the parts

their mintite parts.

of the mixed modes into

12. Our faculties of discovery co?

one idea 1

suited to our state.

• 5. The cause of making

13. Conjecture about spirits.

mixed modes,

14. Complex ideas of sub. CH

· . stances.

6. Why words in one lan.

'
guage have none answer-

:.:15. Idea of spiritual sub.
"ing in another. -

standes, as clear as of
17. And languages change.

bodily substances.
8. Mixed modes, where they

16. No idea of abstract sub.. La

exist,

stance.

9. How we get the ideas of

17.

The cohesion of solido

mixed modes.

parts, and impulse, the

10. Motion, thinking, and

primary ideas of body.

18. Thinking

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

18. Thinking and motivity s. Change of relation may

the primary ideas of spi.

be without any change

rit.

in the subject.

19-21. Spirits capable of mo. 6. Relation only betwixt two

tion.

things.

22. Idea of soul and body 7. All things capable of re.

compared.

·lation.

23—27. Cohesion of solid parts in 8. The ideas of relation

body, as bard to be con-

clearer often, than of the

ceived, as thinking in a

subjects related.

soul.

9. Relations all terminate in

78, 29. Communication of motion

simple ideas.

by impulse, or by thought, 10. Terms leading the mind

equally intelligible.

beyond the subjects deno.

30. Ideas of body and spirit

minated, are relative,

compared.

ii. Conclusion.

31. The notion of spirit in.

volves no more difficulty

in it than that of body. CHA P. XXVI.
32. We know: nothing beyond

Of cause and effect, and other

our simple ideas.

relations,

33-35. Idea of God.

36. No ideas in our complex

1. Whence their ideas got.

one of spirits, but those

2. Creation,generation, mak.
got from sensation or re.

ing alteration,
ffection. .

3, 4. Relations of time.
37. Recapitulation.

5. Relations of place and

extension.
CHAP. XXIV.

6. Absolute terms ofren stand

for relations.
Of collective ideas of substance,

SÉCT.

1. One idea.

CHA P. XXVII.

2. Made by the power of Of identity and diversity.

composing in the mind. SECT. .....

3. All artcial things are . 1. Wherein identity. con-

collective ideas.

sists.

2. Identity of substances.

CHAP. XXV.

• Identity of modes.

3. Principium individuatio.
Of relation. .

nis.

. 4. Identity of vegetables,
1. Relation, what.

:15. Identity of animals.

2. Relations, without corre. 6. Idèncity of man..

Jative terms, not easily

7. Identity suited to the

perceived.

idea.

3. Some seemingly absolute 8. Same man.

terms contain relations,

9. Personal identity.

4. Relation different from 10. Consciousness makes per.
the things related.

sonai identity.

10. Powers make a great per

of our complex ideas de

:.

substaricese

lities of bodies would din

appear, if we could disco-

ver the primary ones e

their minute parts,

12. Our faculties of discorery

suited to our state.

63. Conjecture about spirits.

14. Complex ideas of sube

..:15. Idea of spiritual sub SEC

stances, as clear as a

bodily substances

16. No idea of abstract som

stance.

[ocr errors]
« AnteriorContinuar »