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By faith I hope to see the sun,

The light of grace that lent; .
His everlasting circles run

In glory's firnament.
By faith I'm more than conqueror,

Ev’n though I nothing can;
Because I set JEHOVAH's pow'r

Before me in the van.
By faith I counterplot my foes,

Nor need their ambush fear;
Because my life-guard also goes

Behind me in the rear.
Py faith I walk, I run, I fly;

By faith I suffer thrall;
By faith, I'm fit to live and die;

By faith I can do all.

SECT. V.

The Heighis and Depths of Sensei

WHE

HEN Heav'n me grants at certain times,

Amidst a pow'rful gale, Sweet liberty to mone my crimes,

And wand'rings to bewail;
Then do I dream my sinful brood,

Drown’d in the ocean main
Of chrystal tears and crimson blood,

Will never live again.
I get my fues beneath my feet,

I bruise the serpent's head ;
I hope the vict'ry is complete,

And all my lusts are dead. How gladly do I think and say,

When thus it is with me,
Sin to my sense is clean away,

And so Ihall ever be?
But, Ah! alas! th’ ensuing hour

My lusts arise and swell,
They rage and reinforce their pow'r,

With new recruits from hell.

Though I resolv'd and swore through grace

In very solemn terms,
I never should my lusts embrace,

Nor yield unto their charms;
Yet such deceitful friends they are,

While I no danger dreamn,
I'm snar'd before I am aware,

And hurry'd down the stream. Into the gulph of fin anon

I'm plunged head and cars ;
Grace to my sense is wholly gone,

And I am chain'd in fears;
Till straight my Lord with sweet surprize

Returns to loose my bands,
With kind compassion in his eyes,

And pardon in his hands.
Yet thus my life is nothing else

But heav'n and hell by turns ;
My soul that now in Goshen dwells,

Anon in Egypt mourns.

SE C T. VI.

Faith and Frames compared; or, Faitb building upon

Sense discovered. FAITH has for its foundation broad

A ftable rock on which I stand, The truth and faithfulness of God :

All other grounds are sinking fand. My frames and feelings ebb and flow;

And when my faith depends on them, It fleets and staggers to and fro,

And dies amidst the dying frame. That faith is surely most unftay'd,

Its ftagg'ring can't be counted strange, That builds its hope of lasting aid

On things that ev'ry moment change. But could my faith lay all its load

On Jesus' everlasting name, Upon the righteousness of God,

And divine truth that's still the same :

Could I believe what God has fpuke,

Rely on his unchanging love, And cease to grasp at fleeting smoke,

No changes would my mountain move. But when, low foon the frame's away,

And comfortable feeling fail ; So foon my faith falls in decay,

And unbelieving doubts prevail : This proves the charge of latent vice,

And plain my faith's defects may show; I built the house on thawing ice,

That tumbles with the melting snow. When divine fmiles in fight appear,

And I enjoy the heav'nly gale ; When wind and tide, and all is fair,

I dream my faith shall never fail: My heart will false conclusions draw,

That strong my mountain shall remain; That in my faith there's not a flaw,

I'll never, never doubt again. I think the only rest I take,

Is God's unfading word and name; And fancy not my faith fo weak,

As e'er to trust a fading frame. But, ah! by sudden turns I see

My lying heart's fallacious guilt, And that my faith, not firm in me,

On sinking fand was partly bụilt: For lo! when warming beams are gone,

And shadows fall; alas ! 'tis odd,
I cannot wait the rising fun,

I cannot trust a hiding God.
So much my faith's affiance seems

Its life from fading joys to bring,
That when I lose the dying streams,

I cannot trust the living spring. When drops of comfort quickly dry'd

And sensible enjoyments fail; When chearing apples are deny'd,

Then doubts instead of faith prevail.

But why, though fruit be snatch'd from me,

Should I distrust the glorious root, And still affront the standing tree,

By trusting more to falling fruit; The smallest trials may evince

My faith unfit to stand the shock, That more depends on fleeting sense,

Than on the fix'd eternal Rock. The fafest ark when floods arise,

Is stable truth that changes not ; How weak’s my faith, that more relies

On feeble sense's floating boat? For when the fleeting frame is gone,

I straight my flate in question call; I drop and sink in deeps anon,

As if my frame were all in all. But though I miss the pleasing gale,

And heav'n withdraw the charming glance; Unless Jeuovau's oath can fail,

My faith may keep its countenance. The frame of nature shall decay,

Time-changes break her rusty chains; Yea, heav'n and earth shall pass away;

But faith's foundation firm remains. Heav'n's promises so fix'dly stand,

Ingrav'd with an immortal pen, In great IMMANUEL's mighty hand,

All hell's attempts to raze are vain. Did faith with none but truth advise,

My steady soul would move no more, Than stable hills when tempests rise,

Or folid rocks when billows roar. But when my faith the counsel hears

Of present sense aud reason blind, My wav'ring spirit then appears

A feather toss’d with ev'ry wind. Lame legs of faith unequal crook;

Thus mine, alas ! unev’nly stand, Else I would trust my stable rock,

Not fading frames and feeble sand :

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I would, when dying comforts fly,

As much as when they present were, Upon my living joy rely,

Help, Lord, for here I daily err.

CH A P. V. The BELIEVER'S PRINCIPLES concerning

Heaven and Eartb.

SECT. I.

The Work and Contention of Heaven.

IN
N heav'nly choirs a question rose,

That stirr'd up strife will never close,
What rank of all the ransom'd race
Owes highest praise to sov’reign grace?
Babes thither caught from womb and breaft,
Claim'd right to sing above the rest;
Because they found the happy shore
They never saw nor sought before.
Those that arriv'd at riper age,
Before they left the dusky stage,
Though grace deserv'd yet higher praise,
That wash'd the blots of num'rous days.
Anon the war more close began,
What praising harps should lead the van?
And which of grace's heav'nly peers
Was deepest run in her arrears?
“ Tis I, (said one), 'bove all my race,
“ Am debtor chief to glorious grace.”
Nay, (faid another), hark, I trow
“ I'm more oblig'd to grace than you.”
“ Stay, (faid a third), I deepest share
" In owing praise beyond compare ;
• The chief of finners you'll allow,
• Must be the chief of singers now.”
“ Hold, (faid a fourth), I here protest

My praises must outvie the best; " For I'm of all the human race “ The highest miracle of grace.”

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