The History of the Rebellion and Civil Wars in England, Begun in the Year 1641, Volumen 5

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Página 22 - And the men of Israel answered the men of Judah, and said, We have ten parts in the king, and we have also more right in David than ye; why then did ye despise us, that our advice should not be first had in bringing back our king?
Página 183 - ... some men who lived not far off, and who many times came to visit him, had some...
Página 354 - he was prouder to have his head set upon the place it was appointed to be, than he could have been to have had his picture hang in the king's bedchamber : that he was so far from being troubled that his four limbs were to be hanged in four cities of the kingdom, that he heartily wished that he had flesh enough to be sent to every city in Christendom, as a testimony of the cause for which he suffered.
Página 68 - Scots had again made to him ; and " that he did really believe that it could not be long before there would be a war between the two nations ; in which the Scots promised themselves an universal...
Página 45 - ... they were informed that he was met out of the town by break of day, with one servant only, on the way to the army ; where he had appointed a rendezvous of some regiments of the horse, and from whence he writ a letter to the house of commons...
Página 72 - ... atheism, and rebellion ; but by God's wonderful blessing, the goodness and richness of that soil could not be made barren by all that stupidity...
Página 71 - Westminster, forming a new catechism, and scheme of religion,) ever ventured to make any answer to it; nor is it indeed to be answered, but must remain to the world's end, as a monument of the learning, courage, and loyalty, of that excellent place, against the highest malice and tyranny that was ever exercised in or over any nation...
Página 267 - Windsor castle, had by a wonderful adventure, having a cord and all things necessary conveyed to him, let himself down out of the window of his chamber in the night, over the wall of the Tower ; and had been directed through what part of the ditch he might be best able to wade. Whether he found the right place, or whether there was no safer place, he found the water and the mud so deep, that, if he had not been by the head taller than other men, he must have perished, since the water came up to his...
Página 256 - ... from any treasonable purpose to do him any harm, but from particular and personal animosities against other men. And, afterwards, the terror all men were under of the parliament, and the...
Página 227 - ... that we and they might meet once again in a due parliamentary way, to agree the bounds of prince and people.

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