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age of no common claim. But is perfectly in character, as the before we proceed to the book production of a sequestered episitself, let us spend a few lines on copal divine, in 1655; but to do the author, a man who, by the our author justice, we must add capriciousness of literary fame, is that there is not that bitterness less known than the most of his in it towards the dominant party, contemporaries, though few have which their acknowledged bias merited a more lasting name. towards enthusiasm might be supMeric, son of the learned Isaac posed to warrant. There is not Casaubon, was born at Geneva, in even an attempt to identify his 1599. He became one of the opponents on disciplinarian points prebends of Canterbury, and, as with the enthusiasts whom he exin duty bound, was a most bitter poses, a fact which is an honoraenemy to the puritans. This being ble exception to the polemical all in the way of business, we character of most of the friends shall not offer any comment on it, of the hierarchy in that period. only begging permission to say, The following extract is from the that there were many subjects chapter on “ Divinetory Enthuthat he understood much better siasme.' than the nonconformist contro- .“ The ancient stoick philosophers, who versy, and that on them we will did ascribe all things unto fate or destiny, cheerfully hear his opinion. He

did enlarge themselves very much upon

this subject; alledging, first, that as was almost universally learned,

nothing did happen in the world, but particularly in criticism and his by an eternal concatenatiou of causes; tory, of a strong masculine judg. so, secondly, that there is such a dement, hut not of a brilliant ima

pendance of these causes, of the one

upon the other, that nothing can truly gination. His pieces are rather

be said to happen suddenly, but beinstructive than pleasing, or when cause it had in and of itself an aptitude pleasing, the pleasure rather arises to be foreseen long before in its causes. from the author's accuracy of con

Nay, some went farther, that all things

that should be, had a kind of present ception and general consistency, being in the generality of nature, though than from any remarkable happi- no actual visible existence. Upon all ness of expression. The book which they inferred the possibility of diwhich is now under consideration,

vination by the knowledge of nature.

But leaving them to their opinions, has been rightly called by Sir

as too general and remote, Democritus William Temple, "a happy at will bring us nearer to our aim: who tempt to account for delusions on maintained that out of all things that natural principles." The author's

happened by natural causes, there proaim is to explain « Enthusiasme. ceeded certain species (eldwla he called as it is an effect of nature, but is

them) and emanations; not from the mistaken by many for either Divine existent, (though then indeed most strong Inspiration, or Diabolical Posses- and apparent,) but from their causes sion.” It is divided into six also. It will be hard to make them that chapters, the subjects of which are

ture at all, to comprehend this; I do as follows. I. Of Enthusiasme in not say to believe it, that is another general.-II. Of Divinetory En- thing; but to comprehend what is inthusiasme.--III. Of Contempla

tended, whether true or false. But they tive and Philosophical Enthu.

that have so much philosophy in them,

as to be able to give some account siasme.--IV. Of Rhetorical En more than every child can (because he thusiasme.-V. Of Poetical En- hath eyes) how they see, especially if thusiasıpe._VI. Of Precatory En: ever they have been spectators of the thusiasme. Our readers will ob

1 species of nbjects, gathered through a serve, that the subject of this book in a dark chamber, upon a white wall,

N. S. No, 50.

en ac

or a sheet of paper ; as most (I suppose) tal apprehension of what is spoken unto that have any curiosity, have seen at them; as a horse, or a dog, may be some time or other : such may the better ruled by some words, which (by comconceive what is intended. Not that I mon use of man's first institution) shall make those species that issue out of ob- be proper to the actions which they perjects, by the intromission whereof the form : yet, even then, they understand sight is accomplished, to be the very not the words as words, but sounds same as those emanations he maintained; only. From that subordination of speech but only to have some kind of resem- unto reason it is that the Grecians comblance, whereby those may the better prehend both (which nevertheless doth be understood.”-p. 42.

excuse ambiguity sometimes) in one word, · The following interesting pas

Toyoc. If, therefere, reason be so na

tural unto man, and speech unto reason, sages are from the chapters of

it is no wonder if, as reason is the in“ Rhetorical Enthusiasme." ward principle by which the actions of "Few men, even they who consider

men are guided, so speech is the most

powerfull external instrument to the of many other things, take notice what

same end, in reference to others. Rhea rare art speaking is ; or so much as

torick (or rhetoricall speech) is a speech think of it, under the notion of an art.

dressed with certain devices and allureThe reason is, because they were very

ments, proper to please and to persuade. little when they learned, and though it

The use of such devices and allurements were not without much labour and striv

is, sometimes, good, by the advantage ing, yet they had scarce wit enough to be

of some sensuall delight, the more powersensible of it then, or at least not me

fully to enforce or to insinuate somemory enough now to remember what

what that of itself is true, right, or they thought of it when so young. It is

reasonable. However, it is a very disa curious speculation to consider what

putable point, whether bare speech, is instruments nature hath provided for

well handled, be not sufficient, nay, that use; what is the proper use of

most available to persuade in things of every instrument; what resemblance

most weight. For those actions are best those instruments have to some musical

grounded that are grounded upon judginstruments; what letters are formed by

ment, upon which bare speech has most the tongue especially, which by the

direct influence, as rhetorick hath upon teeth, which by the roof of the mouth,

the affections: and the fruits of a connose, throat, lips, or otherwise ; and by

victed judgment, by calm reason, are what concurrence, motions, flections, and

likely to be more durable than those reflections of such and such of those

that are the effects of any passions, or instruments, inwardly, and by what

affections, stirred up by rhetorical shapes, signes, and postures of the

powers.” mouth, lips, and chinne, outwardly, the whole businesse is managed. There is The author's remarks on the not any thing more natural unto man

synthetical part of rhetoric are (as he is a man, that is, a rational creature) than reason. Whatsoever may seem very curious. We can quote but natural unto man besides (in this life) a brief abstract. some one or two not very considerable things, as laughing, perchance, or weep “ They must begin first of all with ing, excepted, belongeth unto brutes the consideration of single letters, and as well as unto man; and no part inquire not from grammarians only, but of man, therefore, as man properly. from best and choicest philosophers, Speech is the interpreter, or minister of what is their natural power and proreason, that is, of rationall thoughts, or perty; which letters are naturally thoughts ingendered in and by a rational smooth, which are rough or sharp ; what soul. Which, according to their object, vowels grave and stately, what quick may be distinguished into sensuall, and nimble; what effects and operacivill, and intellectuall; but always ra- tions to the conjunction of such with tionall, as they flow from a rationall cause reference either to the care, and the or principle, which is the soul. Whence nature of it, or to the instruments, the it is that brute beasts, though some teeth, tongue, nose, throat, &c., by may be taught to utter many words and which they are formed, and to their tones, perchance; yet cannot be said motions in forming are natural.--There properly to speak, because they under- is no part of nature more obscure, where stand not, truly and really, any thing that there is so little suspicion of obscurity ; they say.' Though some may be brought no wonder, therefore, if they that have to some kind of practical or experimen- laboured in this search, are not always

age of no common claim. But is perfectly in character, as the before we proceed to the book production of a sequestered episitself, let us spend a few lines on copal divine, in 1655; but to do the author, a man who, by the our author justice, we must add capriciousness of literary fame, is that there is not that bitterness less known than the most of his in it towards the dominant party. contemporaries, though few have which their acknowledged bias merited a more lasting name. towards enthusiasm might be supMeric, son of the learned Isaac posed to warrant. There is not Casaubon, was born at Geneva, in even an attempt to identify his 1599. He became one of the opponents on disciplinarian points prebends of Canterbury, and, as with the enthusiasts whom he exin duty bound, was a most bitter poses, a fact which is an honoraenemy to the puritans. This being ble exception to the polemical all in the way of business, we character of most of the friends shall not offer any comment on it, of the hierarchy in that period. only begging permission to say, The following extract is from the that there were many subjects chapter on “ Divinetory Enthuthat he understood much better siasme.” than the nonconformist contro- ." The ancient stoick philosophers, who versy, and that on them we will did ascribe all things unto fate or destiny, cheerfully hear his opinion. He did enlarge themselves very much upon

this subject; alledging, first, that as was almost universally learned,

nothing did happen in the world, but particularly in criticism and his by an eternal concatenatiou of causes; tory, of a strong masculine judg. so, secondly, that there is such a de: ment, hut not of a brilliant ima

pendance of these causes, of the one

upon the other, that nothing can truly gination. His pieces are rather

be said to happen suddenly, but beinstructive than pleasing, or when cause it had in and of itself an aptitude pleasing, the pleasure rather arises to be foreseen long before in its causes. from the author's accuracy of con

Nay, some went farther, that all things

that should be, had a kind of present ception and general consistency,

being in the generality of nature, though than from any remarkable happi. no actual visible existence. Upon all ness of expression. The book which they inferred the possibility of diwhich is now under consideration,

vination by the knowledge of nature.

But leaving them to their opinions, has been rightly called by Sir

as too general and remote, Democritus William Temple, "a happy at- will bring us nearer to our aim: who tempt to account for delusions on maintained that out of all things that natural principles." The author's happened by natural causes, there proaim is to explain « Enthusiasme,

ceeded certain species (eldwla he called as it is an effect of nature, but is

them) and emanations; not from the

things themselves only, when actually mistaken by many for either Divine existent, (though then indeed most strong Inspiration, or Diabolical Posses and apparent,) but from their causes sion.” It is divided into six

also. It will be hard to make them that

have no philosophical knowledge of nachapters, the subjects of which are

ture at all, to comprehend this; I do as follows. I. Of Enthusiasme in not say to believe it, that is another general.-II. Of Divinetory En thing ; but to comprehend what is inthusiasme.—III. Of Contempla

tended, whether true or false. But they

that have so much philosophy in them, tive and Philosophical Enthu.

as to be able to give some account siasme.-IV. Of Rhetorical En more than every child can (because he thusiasme.-V. Of Poetical En- hath eyes) how they see, especially if thusiasıne.-VI. Of Precatory En- ever they have been spectators of the thusiasme. Our readers will ob

species of objects, gathered through a

little hole and a piece of glasse before it, serve, that the subject of this book in a dark chamber, upon a white wall,

N. S. NO. 50.

which have long been inseparably that any other plan, though it conjoined with the present mode should be free from those evils, of collecting money in London would not be effective for proviand its vicinity, for the objects ding and continuing a constant aid above-mentioned, will be best seen for building, enlarging, and reand judged of, by a statement of pairing places of Worship in the the facts of the case, and of their country, has hitherto prevented actual bearing on the operations the serious consideration and acand the results of the plan and tual adoption of any other system proceedings heretofore adopted of benevolence, to promote these

1st. There being no Society, important objects. and no collected fund, every ap- It is now, however, proposed, plicant is under the necessity of that the religious public who have acting as a collector from a great hitherto contributed to the aid of number of individuals, residing at our country friends, in the respects a considerable distance from each above referred to ; and also those other.

who are disposed to unite with 2d. There are, therefore, as them, for carrying into effect these many collectors as applicants; laudable purposes, upon a plan and as all of them come from the that shall promise competency, country, and some from very dis- economy, and stability, should tant parts of it, a very great ex- form themselves into a Society ; pense is necessarily incurred there to be named (if so agreed on), by, and a serious loss occasioned « The London Congregational to the important objects for which Building Fund.” The said Society the money has been collected to be supported by annual or quar

3d. As these applications are terly subscriptions; to be managed generally made by ministers, an by appropriate officers; and that office is thus imposed on them, under suitable rules and regulawhich is unworthy of their voca- tions, the consideration and aftion, unsuitable and repulsive to fording aid to cases which appear their habits and feelings, and inju- to come within the prescribed rious to their usefulness.

rules, shall be carried into conti4th. The donors are subjected nued effect. to a considerable number of appli- There can scarcely be a doubt, cations every year; some of but that every object which has which, at times, are attended with hitherto been attained for the begreat personal inconvenience, and nefit of the cause of God in the are also liable to be connected country, will be made more conwith circumstances and feelings of veniently, and less expensively an unpleasant nature to both effected, under the system which parties.

is now proposed for adoption; It could hardly be expected provided a fund can be collected that a system so irregular, expen- from year to year for that purpose. sive, inconvenient, and injurious, But it is supposed, that there could have continued so long in will be an indisposition in many operation as it has done. The persons to subscribe annually or evils connected with it have been quarterly to a society, to an felt and complained of by each amount that will be equal to party concerned in it, and a strong what they have been used to desire has often been expressed give to the successive applicafor a removal of them; and it is tions which have been made to presumed, that an apprehension them for the same object; and

that the annual provision for such and such necessary discrimination appropriate cases as shall be sub- be made and acted on, as shall mitted to the Society, will there- tend to exclude those cases, the fore be found inadequate for admission of which might justly their relief. It may, however, be deemed inexpedient and inbe observed :

eligible; by which means, and Ist. That, although there may by impartial and appropriate rebe a falling off on the subscrip- lief on all suitable and really netions of some individuals, it is cessitous occasions, it may be exprobable that there will be ad pected that the funds of a Society ditional aid afforded from many will be found quite adequate for others, ladies especially, who its support. have been indisposed to give to 4th. That a Society formed for individual and successive appli- such important and useful purcations.

poses and objects, will probably 2d. That the proposed Society, be benefited by occasional dowill save the heavy charges which nations, and by testamentary have been incurred under the bequests : and thus, it is to be present system, for travelling, &c. hoped, that, by the Divine favour, and therefore will allow the ap- a competent, respectable, and propriation of a greater amount permanent establishment, will sucto the important objects of the ceed those desultory exertions Society.

which, though very laudable and 3d. That due attention will be useful, have frequently been congiven to ascertain the pecuniary nected with circumstances which means and capacities of the have made them unsatisfactory places from which applications and injurious. for assistance shall be received,

PROBUS.

REMARKS ON PROFESSOR HURWITZ'S INTRODUCTORY LECTURE

AT THE UNIVERSITY OF LONDON. To the Editors.-As I am anxi- very language that God had oys to elicit truth, I beg leave to taught our first parents, though offer the following inquiries to Moses expressly attributes the the consideration of your readers, imposition of names to Adam, whilst I ayow the most friendly and only intimates, that God had feeling towards the learned Pro- endowed him with a soul capable fessor, and the noble Institution of forming thoughts, and with in wbich he labours.

organs capable of uttering articuThe first relates to the origin of late sounds, which he might use language.

as signs of mental conceptions, In your extracts from the In- and that he had placed him under troductory Lecture of Professor circumstances best fitted to excite Hurwitz, given in your last num- these capabilities to action: even ber, I read as follows :* _“ From as the same wisdom infused the that mistaken zeal, which too often germinal and distinctive form in excuses fraud by the presumed every seed after its kind, and aspiety of the motive, it was as- signed to each its befitting place serted, that [Hebrew) was the and circumstance; but left it to

the sun and the breeze, to the * See Cong. Mag. p. 49. protecting earth, the nourishing

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